Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1885330 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 1, 1932
Filing dateSep 1, 1931
Priority dateSep 1, 1931
Publication numberUS 1885330 A, US 1885330A, US-A-1885330, US1885330 A, US1885330A
InventorsCherdron Otto P, Scott Carl W
Original AssigneeCherdron Otto P, Scott Carl W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Building construction
US 1885330 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. l, 1932. o. P. CHERDRON ET ALl BUILDING CONSTRUCTION Filed Sept. l, 1931 QN L@ @1 N 2 Sheets-Sheet l Nov. l, 1932- o. P. CHERDRON ET AL 1,885,330

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION Filed Sept. l. 1931 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Nov. 1, 1932 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE OTTO I. CHERDRON AND CARL W. SCOTT, F SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH BUILDING CONSTRUCTION Application led September 1, 1931. Serial No. 560,622.

An object of this invention is to provide a satisfactory building construction whichcan be made up in sections in a shop and assembled on the job, which might be called buildings of a steel frame type with separate panels slid into it. n

Another object is to provide a building construction which is light in weight, easily handled, shipped, stored, assembled .and disassembled without loss, and inexpensive to manufacture, and which lends itself for mass pro duction.

Another object is to provide a building construction which will be very7 strong and rigid for a given weight of material.

These and other objects, 'as will hereinafter appear, are accomplished by this inventionv which is fully described in the following specication and shown in the accompanying drawings, in which- Figure 1 is a partial perspective view of a shed or building embodying the invention showing one vertical panel and its corresponding roof panel in place, and other panels left '25 open;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged partial vertical'section through these panels, and showing the intermediate studding and rafter construction' 4 Y Fig. 3 is an enlarged section on eitherof the lines 3 of Fig. 2 through the studding or rafter;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged horizontal section on the line 4 of Fig. 1 showing the corner studding or rafter;

Fig. 5 is lan enlarged vertical section showing the method of securing the ridge member to the roof panels;

Fig. 6 is a partial perspective view ofthe lower end of a rafter, together with a driving clip for securing the roof panels in place to form a finish;

Fig. 7 is a horizontal section through a studding'showing the method of hanging a door or a sash hinge thereon;

Fig. 8 is an enlarged horizontal section 'showing a preferred form of corner studding or corner rafter on the line 4 of Fig. l; v Fig. 9 is a section through an edge of a panel showing the metal spring-like covering for the panel; and

Fig. 10 is a partial perspective detail of a tie or spacing rod for spacing the various vertical frame members through the gusset plates to lend rigidity to the structure.

The embodiment illustrated comprises essentially a skeleton frame for a building made up of spaced paralleled studding and rafters, each rafter being in alignment with the studding supporting it, and so formed that vertical panel members may be inserted between adjacent studding after which roof panels may be inserted between adjacent rafters to thereby complete the sides and roofv of the 6J building.

The frame or skeleton of the building comprises a baseplate or sill 11 which is adapted to be secured to a suitable foundation 1.2 as by means of bolts 13. To this sill is secured a plurality of vertically extending studding 14,

Awhich is shown in enlarged cross section in Fig. 3. This studding is formed from sheet metal into a general Lshape with spaced central webs 14a, an enlarged central bead 14", the opposite end having spaced flange members 14c and 14, these flange members having inwardly turned lips 14e. The webs 14a are preferably pressed inwardly and spotwelded at 14t atintervals to hold them in 80 spaced relation, as shown, thereby forming a space 14g for the reception of a gusset plate, as will later be described.

The flanges 14, 14d are resilient, and together with the inwardly turned lips 14e 85 serve to grip an insulating member 15, which preferably consists of a sheet of insulating board, wallboard, or the like, which is covered by a sheet metal sheath 16, the opposing edges of the insulating member having grooves 17, 18, Fig. 9 which are adapted to register with the longitudinal inwardly turned lips 14e, so as to be gripped thereby. To assist in this gripping action and to make a reasonably weatherproof joint, the inner end 1b2L of the 95 sheath 16 is made to project a little outwardly,

turned lips 112l of the sill 11. In assemblingv 100 lit) the shed or building the sill 11 is first set in place and bolted down, after which the studding 14 are secured thereto and bolted to upwardly turned ears 11b of the sill 11. The rafters 19 are then secured to the tops of the studding 14 by means of gusset plates 2O which are slid into the space 14g and secured thereto by means of bolts 21. Similarly, a gusset plate connects the upper ends of the rafters. At the ridge is secured a ridge inember 22 which closes the gap of the roof panels, and which is similarly formed of sheet metal. This ridge member is shown in more detail in Fig. 5, and comprises an inwardly turned lip 22a at each side, as well as a spring-like portion 22h, which passes inwardly between and engages the upper ends of roof panels 23, and is then heldin place by a spring action, as indicated in dotted lines in Fig. 5. It will be understood that the engaging portions of the panels and studdingI and raftersI may be varied to a considerable degree by different forms of gripping action to make a reasonably weatherproof connection.

With the studding and rafters thus assembled and in place, as shown in Fig. 1, they are held in the proper spaced relation by means of a tie rod 24 (see Figs. 2 and 10) at each side of the shed and at the roof ridge, these rods passing through openings 25 of the shape of a key slot in the gusset plates, the rods being inserted through the large end of the slot and having necked-in portions 24n which engage the small portion of the key slot to prevent movement of the studding relative to the rod. These rods may be round, at, or the like.v Side panels 15 may then be slid down between two adjacent studding, these panels passing between flanges -14c and 14", as shown in Fig. 3, and having horizontally disposed opposing notches or grooves, such as engage the inwardly turned lips 11a of the baseplate. Thus, the vertical panels are not only locked in place, but are also tightly fitted to the studding and baseplate which support them so as to be reasonably weatherproof. It will be noted that the rafters are cut back to permit the panels to be slid into place from above. This construction permits of the building being erected with a minimum of labor.

The roof is then formed by similarly inserting a roof panel 23 which is assembled in substantially the same manner, the rafters 19 being substantial duplicates of studding 14. These roof panels likewise are provided with longitudinal grooves into which` lit inwardly turned lips of the rafters 19 in the same way as that which was shown in Fig. 3 and described for the studding. Thus, each roof panel serves as a lock to prevent the removal of its vertical side panel. A small crack may be left between4 the vertical panel and its roof panel, and this may be f closed by means of a suitable cement 26.

Leases@ Both these panels may be formed with suitable ribs, such as 16a and 23, on the vertical and roof panels, respectively. These ribs improve the appearance of the panels and serve to give them additional stiness. These panels may be further stiffened and strengthened by Qementing the insulatingy member 15 to its sheath 16, Fig. 9.

The roof panel is then retained in place by means of a drive clip 27 which extends around adjacent lower ends of the roof pan els 23, and has two spaced narrow portions 27a adapted to fit into spaced openings 1,9a and 19b in the rafter 19 Fig. 6. Friction of these driving clips is sufficient to hold the roof members in place, and to close the gap between the lower yends of the roof panels.

In Figs. 1 and 4 is shown a form of corner post 28, while Fig. 8 shows another and preferred form of corner post 29. A method of hinging a sash to the studding is shown in Fig. 7 in which one leaf 30 of a hinge is secured to the studding 14 as by spot-welding at 30a and 30", the other leaf 31 being secured to the sash 32 which is thus shown as being adapted to be swung outwardly. A suitable cornice as 33 Fig. 1 may be mounted at the gables of the building to give it a finished appearance.

Thus it will be seen that a very simple and eiicient form of shed construction is provided which can readily be assembled and disassembled without destruction of any of the material forming the same which lends itself to manufacture in quantities in a shop for erection complete in the field, and which at the same time can be economically manufactured and sold.

Thile we have shown and described but a few embodiments of our invention, it is to be understood that it is capable of many modiications. Changes, therefore, in the construction and arrangement may be made which do not depart from the spirit and scope of the invention as disclosed in the appended claims.

IVe claim:

1. In a building construction, a structural` member formed from sheet metal bent upon itself to forma cross section of substantially an I shape, having at one end of its cross section a bead and at the other end of the cross section two opposing channels with continuous integral flanges to engage panels by gripping spring action.

2. In a building construction, a structural member formed from sheet metalbent upon itself to form a cross section of substantially an I shape, having at one end ofthe cross section two opposing channels with continuous integral anges to engage panels by gripping spring action.

3. In a building construction, a structural member formed from sheet metal bent upon itself to form a cross section of substantially' an I form, having at one end of its cross section a bead and at the other end two opposing channels with continuous integral flanges to afford a corner construction to engage panels by gripping spring action.

4. In a building construction, a structural member formed from sheet metal bent upon itself to form a cross section of substantially an I form, having at one end of the cross section two opposing channels with continuous integral flanges to afford a corner construction to engage panels by gripping spring action. c

5. In a building construction, studding as described in claim 1, having inwardly turned lips on each flange of the channel and vertical panels slidable in said channels andhaving grooves corresponding in cross section to the inwardly turned lips, whereby they are adapted to be secured in said channels.

6. In a building construction, studding composed of formed-metal having inwardly turned edges on each flange of the channel A and vertical panels slidable in said channels and having grooves registering with the inwardly turned edges, whereby they are adapted to be secured, said panels having a covering of sheet metal overlying the portions having the grooves, one edge of said covering being free to spring outwardly to lock said panel and studding together to make it substantially Weather-proof.

7. In a building construction, a struc-` tural member as described in claim 1,' a sill of channel shape formed of sheet-metal having a continuous channel formed with integral flanged members, adapted to receive the bottom of said vertical panel.

8. In a building construction, metal studding, metal rafters secured thereto and in alignment therewith, gusset plates connecting each studding and rafter in alignment and tie rods extending through and between said gusset plates and having notched portions engaging openings in the gusset plates to hold the same in place.

9. In a building construction, metal studding, metal rafters, said studding and rafters being formed of sheet metal bent to form substantially an I shape, -having spaced sheet metal portions forming the web and gusset plates secured between said spaced sheet metal portions for fastening the studding and rafters together.

10. In a building construction, metal studdin g, metal rafters, said studding and rafters being formed of slieet metal bent to form substantially an I shape, having spaced sheet metal in the web, gusset plates secured in said web =for fastening the studding and rafters together and tie rods having reduced portions passing through key-hole slots in said gusset plates whereby the reduced portions of the tie rods may engage reduced portions of the key-hole slots to lock the studding and rafter sections in spaced relation.

11. In a building construction, studding having channels adapted to receive vertical panels, vertical panels adapted to be slid from the top into said channels, roof panels of the same spacing as the vertical panels, adapted to be slid into place between the rafters, said roof panels leaving a space at the top and a ridge member having outwardly extending yieldable edges adapted to be sprung inwardly to permit the ridge member to be secured to said roof panels.

12. In a building construction, studding having channels adapted to receive vertical panels, vertical panels adapted to be slid from the top into said channels, roof panels of the same spacing as the vertical panels adapted to be slid into place between the rafters, and a drive clip adapted to pass around the lower adjacent edges of two adjacent roof panels and having ends engageable with the rafter therebetween for securing the roof panels in place.

13. In a building construction, studding having channels adapted to receive vertical panels, vertical panels adapted to be slid from the top into said channels, roof panels of the same spacing as the vertical panels adapted to be slid into place between the rafters, and a drive clip adapted to pass around the lower adjacent edges of two adj acent roof panels and having ends engageable with the rafter therebetween for securing these roof panels in place, said clip serving also to fill the gap between the lower ends of the roof panels filling the space between the over-hanging ends of the roof panels below the lower end of the rafter.

14. In a building construction, studding, rafters as described in claim 1, roof panels adapted to be slidably secured between the rafters to form a substantially weatherproof roof and a drive clip adapted to pass around the lower adjacent edges of two adjacent roof panels and having ends engageable with the rafter therebetween for securing the roof panels in place.

' 15. In a building construction, ribs formed by rigidly attaching together studding and rafters of the form described in claim 1, said ribs being erected as a Skelton and wall and roof panels adapted to be slid into said skeleton to close the opening between the same to form a building structure.

OTTO P. CHERDRON. CARL W. SCOTT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2542859 *Jun 6, 1945Feb 20, 1951Macmillan ClementsBuilding construction
US2717668 *Jun 3, 1950Sep 13, 1955Ind Res LabBuilding construction
US2774386 *Jun 27, 1951Dec 18, 1956Paolo FormentiProfile element for harness frames
US2777318 *Mar 20, 1952Jan 15, 1957William Kinsman ClarenceStructural planking unit for walls or floors
US2809404 *Nov 26, 1954Oct 15, 1957Hinds William FCorner for box or the like
US2948362 *Jul 19, 1957Aug 9, 1960Jones Herbert SBuilding structure
US3088558 *Nov 17, 1958May 7, 1963Harvey Aluminum IncPrefabricated building assembly
US3127960 *Sep 21, 1959Apr 7, 1964Francis Rekert AlbertPanel systems
US3206806 *Jan 16, 1961Sep 21, 1965 Corner strip member for interconnecting panels
US3336707 *Dec 9, 1964Aug 22, 1967Pittsburgh Plate Glass CoStructural gasket curtain wall
US3376676 *May 1, 1967Apr 9, 1968Leon TatevossianPrefabricated aluminum building
US3702044 *Nov 18, 1970Nov 7, 1972United States Gypsum CoCavity shaft wall
US3707818 *Nov 10, 1970Jan 2, 1973United States Gypsum CoShaft cavity wall and stud
US3813840 *Sep 23, 1971Jun 4, 1974Wagenknecht KConstructional element
US3886699 *Aug 2, 1974Jun 3, 1975Bergmann Jr Paul FPortable building structure
US3928951 *Jun 6, 1973Dec 30, 1975Vercon ProductsRoof assemblies for building structures
US3939618 *May 7, 1973Feb 24, 1976Vercon Products, Inc.Foundation assemblies for building structures
US3965634 *Oct 26, 1973Jun 29, 1976Vercon Products, Inc.Modular building
US4342177 *Jun 18, 1979Aug 3, 1982Smith Donald APrefabricated steel frame building construction components and methods
US4594829 *Aug 5, 1983Jun 17, 1986Herrgord Donald EJoint interlocking system
US5216861 *Jul 3, 1991Jun 8, 1993Structural Panels, Inc.Building panel and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/93.1, 52/282.3, 52/639, 52/781
International ClassificationE04B2/60, E04B2/58, E04B1/343
Cooperative ClassificationE04B1/343, E04B2/60
European ClassificationE04B2/60, E04B1/343