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Publication numberUS1885540 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 1, 1932
Filing dateAug 18, 1931
Priority dateAug 18, 1931
Publication numberUS 1885540 A, US 1885540A, US-A-1885540, US1885540 A, US1885540A
InventorsOberti James M
Original AssigneeOberti James M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Brush head swinging device and control
US 1885540 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 1, 1932. M, BERT 1,885,540

BRUSH HEAD SWINGING DEVICE AND CONTROL Filed Aug. 18, 1931 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVEN TOR. \fA/wgs M 056271.

A TTORNEYS.

NOV. 1, 1932. J OBERT] 1,885,540

BRUSH HEAD SWINGING DEVICE AND CONTROL Filed Aug. 18, 1951 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN V EN TOR. Ia/v5.5 M Gazer-1.

A TTORNEYS.

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Patented Nov. 1, 1932 JAMES M. OBERTI, OF SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA BRUSH HEAD SWINGING DEVICE AND CON'IBCL Application filed August 18, 1931. Serial No. 557,867.

handles as filed onJuly 7, 1930, and bearing Serial No. 466,305.

In this co-pending case I disclose means for swinging a brush into various angular positions relative to the handle by axially turning the latter as the brush is advanced over the surface being cleaned.

The principal object of the present invention is to provide a brush of the character described, in which the handle may be firmly grasped by the operator, with manually controlled means for swinging the brush without turning the handle. This arrangement allows a more perfect control to be had over the brush during the sweeping operation.

It is further proposed to extend the brush controlling means into proximity with the hand grasping end of the handle so that the same can be conveniently actuated by'the operator. These means include arotatable sleeve mounted on the handle, and the brush is moved in a direction corresponding with that in which the sleeve is turned.

It is further proposed to provide means for limiting the swinging movement of the brush relative to the handle, and particularly when the length of the brush is presented substantially in the plane of the handle. In this position, the brush is adapted for cleaning walls or the like.

My invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this application, in which Figure 1 is a side elevation of the brush;

Figure 2 is a plan thereof;

Figure 3 illustrates the brush as applied to a wall;

F1 "ure 4 is an enlar 'ed fra 'mentai" 'Jlan o z: a 1 i View of the 00111160111011 between the handle and the brush;

Flgure 5 1s a new similar to Figure l with parts in a dlfferent posltion;

Figure 6 13 an end elevation of Figure l wlth parts in section;

Figure 7 ma rear elevation of Figure 6; and v 7 end of the projection 16.

Figure 8 represents a modification, the brush being shown in section.

Although I have illustrated a brush in the drawings, it should be understood that a squeegee or other cleaning element may be used without departing from the spirit of the invention.

In carrying my invention into practice I provide a cleanin element 1 having a handle 2 swing-ably secured thereto as at 3, with means indicated at 4 which is later adapted for swinging the cleaning element into va rious angular positions relative to the handleby operating means 5.

The cleaning element in the present embodiment comprises a brush head 6 having tufts of bristles 7 mounted on the lower surface thereof in the usual manner, and a wearing strip 8 secured to the upper edge byscrews 9 or other suitable fastening means. A socket 10 is recessed as at 11 for receiving one end of the handle, and the socket in turn is fashioned with a fiat surface 12 that is adapted to'bear against the wearing strip, with the handle extending at an inclination relative to thesurface 14 that is being cleaned.

The connecting means between the brush and the socket consists in a bolt 15 on which the socket is mounted with freedom of swinging movement. The lower end of the bolt and a projection 16 are anchored to the wearing strip Shy welding 17 for the purpose now to be described] Referring now more particularly to Figure 6, it will be noted that a sleeve 18 is ro tatably mounted on-the socket, and that the sleeve has an arm19 mounted thereon at 20. The arm' is slotted at 21 so as to receive the It is apparent from the construction thus far described that a rotation of the sleeve will cause the'brush to swing into various angular positions around the bolt 15 through the medium of the slotted arm and the pr0- 'jection. The direction in which the brush is swung corresponds with that in which the sleeve is turned. V

In Figure 5,1 show the brush head as being rotated so that its length is presented in the same plane as the handle, and it should be particularly noted that the projection 16 is arranged at the end 22 of the slot in the arm 19. Further rotation of the brush relative to the handle is thus prevented.

The brush is adapted to be swung to either side of its normal disposition with respect to the handle. In Figure l, a turning of the sleeve in the direction of the arrow a will cause the brush to move in a clockwise direction and into a position beneath the handle. The brush may be moved in the opposite direction when the sleeve is turned in the direction of the arrow Z).

The sleeve 18 is preferably operated from a position adajacent to the hand-grasping end 2&- of the handle, and I employ for this purpose a tubular member 25 that is mounted in encircling relation with the handle which is later rigidly connected to the sleeve 18 by neans of a rod 26. The ends of the rod are welded to the sleeve and the tubular member so that a rotation of the latter effect a corresponding turning movement of the sleeve. A stop 27, see Figure 1, prevents the slotted arm from becoming disengaged from the projection 16 by an axial movement of the member 25.

From the foregoing description of the various parts of the device, the operation thereof may be readily understood. The operator grasps the handle in one hand and the tubular member in the other. As the brush is moved over the surface being cleaned, the brush can be moved into angular positions on either side of its normal disposition as shown in Figure 2 by merely rotating the tubular member. The angularity of the brush is thus under control of the operator during the sweeping. The brush is particu larly well adapted for cleaning in corners or other restricted places.

The brush is also adapted for cleaning walls, and it should be noted that the brush can be held against swinging movement around the bolt 15 when this swin ing action is takin place.

A modification of my invention is illustrated in Figure 2, in which the flat surface 12 on the socket is abutted against the wearing strip that is attached to the side of the brush. The handle is moved laterally when the operator desires to swing the brush into angular positions, and this causes a cam action to take place between the socket and the wearing strip, with the result that the brush is turned relative to the handle on the pivot bolt 15.

In the modification, the rotatable sleeve and the slotted arm connection are omitted, and the brush is turned by moving the free end of the handle in a lateraldirection.

While I have shown only the' preferred forms of my invention it should be understood that various changes or modifications may be'made Within the scope of the claims hereto attached without departing from the spirit of the invention.

I claim:

1. A cleaning device comprising a cleaning element, a handle swingably secured thereto, a tubular member telescoped over the handle and adapted to be grasped by the operator, and means connecting said member with said element for swinging the latter about its pivot into angular positions when said member is manually turned, said means being made to move the cleaning element in a direction corresponding with that in which the tubular member is turned.

2. A cleaning device comprising a cleaning element, a handle swingably secured thereto, a projection anchored to said element, a sleeve rotatably arranged on the handle, an arm integral with the sleeve and fashioned with a slotted portion adapted to slidably receive said projection, and a manually operated member arranged on the handle and connected with the sleeve and adapted to be turned for swinging said element about its pivot and into angular positions relative to its normal disposition.

3. A cleaning device comprising a cleaning element, a handle swingably secured thereto, a projection anchored to said element, a sleeve rotatably arranged on the handle, an arm integral with the sleeve and fashioned with a slotted portion adapted to slidably receive said projection, and a manually operated member arranged on the handle and connected with the sleeve and adapted to be turned for swinging said element about its pivot and into angular positions relative to its normal disposition, said slot being dimensioned for limiting the movement of said element when the latter is positioned in a vertical plane beneath said handle.

4. A cleaning device comprising a cleaning element, a handle having an inclined surface abuttable against the side of said element, and means swingably securing the handle to the element, whereby the latter is moved into angular positions relative to the handle when the handle is rotated along its longitudinal axis.

5. A cleaning device comprising a clean ing element having a substantially vertical surface, a handle extending upwardly at an angle with respect to the surface and having an inclined face abutting the surface, and a pivotal connection between the element and handle, the axis of the pivotal connection extending perpendicular to the surface and face, whereby a rotation of the handle on its longitudinal axis will swing the element into angular positions.

J AMES M. OBERTI.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3108304 *Mar 21, 1960Oct 29, 1963Richard RoyCleaning implement having a swivelly mounted handle
US4901392 *Jun 16, 1988Feb 20, 1990David ShapiroFor a push broom
Classifications
U.S. Classification403/33, 15/143.1, 15/154.2, 15/144.2, 403/112, 403/86
International ClassificationB25G3/00, B25G3/38
Cooperative ClassificationB25G3/38
European ClassificationB25G3/38