Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1886236 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 1, 1932
Filing dateJul 16, 1930
Priority dateJul 25, 1929
Publication numberUS 1886236 A, US 1886236A, US-A-1886236, US1886236 A, US1886236A
InventorsMeissner Alexander
Original AssigneeTelefunken Gmbh
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of making wound (roll) condensers of greater breakdown strength
US 1886236 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. MEISSNER .Nov. 1, 1932.

METHOD OF MAKING WOUND (ROLL) CONDENSERS OF GREATER BREAKDOWN STRENGTH Filed July 16, 1930 INVENTOR ALEXANDER MEISSNER BY IY%,WM/

ATTORN EY Patented Nov. i, 1932 ALEXANDER EMEISSNER, OF- BERLIN, GERMANY, ASSIGNOR '10 TELEFUNKEN 'GESELL- SCHAF'I' FUR DRAHTLOSE TELEGRAPHIE M. B. BL, 01 BERLIN, GERMANY, A CORPORA- TION or GERMANY METHOD OF MAKING WOUND (ROLL) CONDENSERS OF GREATER BREAKDOWN STRENGTH Application filed July 16; 1930, Serial No. 468,351, and in Germany July 25, 1929.

The present invention relates to a method of manufacturing condensers possessing a comparatively very high breakdown strength. It has been found that condensers made in accordance with this invention possess a breakdown strength several times greater than heretofore attainable with the same sort of materials. The invention is based upon the method constituting the basic idea as disclosed in my copending U. S. patent application No. 405,818 filed November 8, 1929. In the above mentioned application insulation materials are treated in such a way that the molecules thereof while the material is in liquid state, are subjected to a certain straightening or alining action under the influence of an electrostatic field, by means of electrodes between which a layer of liquid insulation material is passed. By this system a substantially increased density of the insulator and greater freedom from air bubbles or other impurities is insured provided a suitably high electrical potential is maintained. between the electrodes. After this alining process has been effected while the insulation material was in liquid condition, then, in order that such result may be rendered permanent, care must be taken to have the insulator material solidify, if desired, by chilling, while the field is still acting thereon.

The method. herein disclosed is particularly suited for the manufacture of condensers, particularly paper condensers.

The accompanying drawing shows an embodiment by way of example for the product-ion of condenser in accordance with the invention.

In said drawing, a, (1, denote the two metalfoil strips serving as the coats which are to be wound from their rollers or reels '0 '0 upon the drum T or the condenser body.

The insulating tapes or bands are first passed through a vat c which is filled with an impregnant. After leaving the said impregnator vat the insulating tapes come to be adjoined to the metal-foil strips being pressed thereagainst by the aid of a suitable number of cylinders (for instance, d cl The coats a, a, at the same time are subjected to the action of electrical potential by way of the drum T.

It is thus feasible to make conditions so that at the electrodes of the condenser, a very high concentration of the material particles is produced, whereupon all air bubbles are eliminated, with the result that subsequently no tensions and strains will arise in the interior of the condenser, owing to cooling of the insulation material, as would ordinarily be the case.

It will be understood that in lieu of paper any other kind of insulator may be employed, as for instance, some sort of linen material. The impregnant may consist of any suitable sort of insulation material possessing adequately high insulation power. For instance, resins and waxes, also any kind of varnish, and these are caused to solidify by chemical changes. q

The winding or rolling up of the insulation material, of course, can be insured also in some other form. The cylinders 03 can be brought to act also directly upon the roller T.

In order that the insulation material may be given a uniform stress when being wound, it may be more advantageous to make the body '1, cylindrical rather than oval, and to effect the winding somewhat more slowly than customary.'

I claim:

1. An electrical condenser body comprising layers of conducting material and dielectric material, said dielectric material being impregnated with a dielectric substance hav ng its molecular structure aligned by the actlon of an electric field.

2. The steps in a method of manufacturing electrical condenserscomposed of layers of conducting material and dielectric material forming a condenser body, which comprise immersing the dielectric material in an unpregnating dielectric substance in a plastic state, and allowing the impregnant to solidlfy npon said dielectric material while under the influence of a stron electric field.

3. The method 0% manufacturing condensers composed of layers of conducting and dielectric material forming a condenser. body which Comprises immersing the dielectric material in an impregnating dielectric substance in a plastic condition, 'arranginglayers of conducting material and dielectric material and while the imprcgnant in the dielectric material is still in a plastic condition, subjecting the said layers to the action of an electric) field and allowing the impregnant to solidify in the presence of saidfield. l5 s ALEER MEISSNER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2449952 *Dec 26, 1942Sep 21, 1948Magnavox CoMethod of manufacturing condensers
US2886749 *Nov 29, 1955May 12, 1959Bell Telephone Labor IncElectrical circuit elements comprising organic dielectric material
US3984298 *Dec 28, 1970Oct 5, 1976Haber Instruments, IncorporatedElectromolecular propulsion in semiconductive media
WO1998041401A1 *Aug 28, 1997Sep 24, 1998Procter & GambleMethod of assembling web or film materials utilising a static electrical charge
Classifications
U.S. Classification361/314, 29/25.42, 422/186.5, 156/273.1, 204/165, 65/DIG.400, 65/60.4
International ClassificationH01G4/22
Cooperative ClassificationH01G4/22, Y10S65/04
European ClassificationH01G4/22