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Publication numberUS1886766 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 8, 1932
Filing dateFeb 15, 1932
Priority dateFeb 15, 1932
Publication numberUS 1886766 A, US 1886766A, US-A-1886766, US1886766 A, US1886766A
InventorsUlrich Charles B
Original AssigneeArt Metal Construction Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Desk
US 1886766 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

C. B. ULRICH Nov. 8, 1932.

DESK

Filed Feb- 15, 1932 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 //v vE/vTo/e CHARLES B ULRICH I' TTOENEY.

C. B. ULRICH Nov. 8, 1932.

DESK

Filed Feb. 15, 1952 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. CHARLES B. ULRICH Mw/T.

ATTORNEY.

Patented Nov. 8, .1932

UNITED STATES...

once

' cHARLnsB. ULRICH, or JAMEsTowN, NEW YORK, ASSIGNOR 'ro ART METAL cons/muc- TION ooMrA vY, or JAMESTOWN, new YORK, A CORPORATION or MASSACHUSETTS DESK Application filed. February 15, 1932. Serial No. 592,859.

My invention pertains to an improved construction of desk adapted for use particularly in large offices where many desks must be placed close together, for example in rows, or back to back, or both, the purpose of my improved desk construction being to providea more sanitary construction of desk for cleaning purposes generally, and at the same time to materially cheapen the cost of the desk without impairing its quality or utility in. any way. i

In connection with the use of desks for business purposes generally, greater cleanliness and better sanitation have resulted in the so called sanitary desk coming into practically universal use. This type of desk is provided with legs of substantial length extending below the bottomportions of the desk enclosures, which permits the floor to be kept clean under the desk. This construction of desk generally consists of two pedestal. sections one at either end of the desk, to which the top of the desk is secured to make a rigid structure, the desk structure under the desk top and between'tlie pedestals, if any,

having practically nothing to do with the strength and rigidity of the desk. In view of the pedestals constituting the real framework of the desk, and also constituting the supports for the desk, it has heretofore been considered that each pedestal should individually have stable support, to impart stable sup-1 port to the desk as a whole. To efiiect this stability of support, each pedestal has heretofore been provided with four legs, one at each of its corners, so that each pedestal serves as a column to imp art stable support to the top of the desk. While this construction is satisfactory where desks are used singly, it

is relatively expensive. Where it is required to use many of the desks close together, for example, end to end and back to back in large offices, as will appear below, many areas are produced on the floor under the desks, due to the closeness of the end legs to adjacent end legs of other desks, which cannot be readily cleaned, and thus the very purpose of asanitary desk construction is defeated. By my invention, I provide each of the desk pedestalswith but two legs, mounted in such position under the pedestal, that the pedestal, or if preferred, the weight of the desk portion supported by the .two legs, is substantially balanced upon said two legs, when the pedestal is in vertical position resting on its legs. With nay-improved construction,-

when two of the pedestals are connected with adesk top, the structure as a whole is quite,

as effectively supported and quite-as rigid as has been the case heretofore with twice the number of legs per pedestal, thestructure 'is materi ally cheaper to make, and it at the same close together that they touch each other.

As a result, the floor under closely grouped desks can be kept clean readily, and moreover the work of cleaning thefloor is much simplified on account of there being only half as weight of the many obstructions around which the cleaning implement must be moved, as is the case where desks are used having four legs per pedestal, and furthermore, ordinary cleaning implements may be effctively employed and the slow operation of cleaning narrow spaces with special implements is avoided.

My invention will best be understood by reference to the accompanying drawings illustrating a preferred embodiment thereof,

in which Fig. 1 illustrates a row of desks in accordance with my invention, in front elevation,

Fig. 2 shows in a view similar to Fig. 1. a row of desks of a construction commonly used hereto-fore,

Fig. 3 is a bottom view to an enlarged;

scale, of a desk vention,

Fig. 4 SllOWS'lIl a view similar to Fig. 3.

in accordance with my inone of the desks illustrated in Fig. 2.

Fig. 5 shows in plan view four pedestal desks having four legs per pedestal, closely grouped end to end and back to back, to illustrate the small spaces between the. legs of any desk and adjacent legs of adjoining desks, v

Fig. 6 shows in a view similar to Fig. 5,

and adjacent legs of the adjoining des 16.

' Similar numerals refer to similar partsthroughout the several views.

As shown 1n Flg. 3, my improved desk con struction consists of two pedestals 10 and 11 secured to a desktop 12, the pedestal 10 being provided with two legs 13, 13 and the pedestal 11 being similarly provided with two legs 14-, 14:. Each of the legs .13 is secured at its upper end to a member15 extend an ingacross the bottonr end of the frame of the pedestal 10, lengthwise of the desk, which is rigidly secured at its ends to the frame of W the pedestal. Each of the'legs 14 is similarly supported by a member 16 secured to the lower portion of the frame of the pedestal 11, My improved construction may be applled to desks of anymaterial, and where the desks are of wood, the members 15 and 16 may be secured in place by suitable fastening "devices for example screws, and where the desks are of sheet metal, the members 15 and 16 are preferably metal members secured in place either by screws or bolts or other suitable fastening means, for example,

by spot'welding. Theflegs of each pedestal are mounted preferably in avertical plane extending from front to rear centrally through the pedestal, so that the weight of the pedestal and of the desk parts supported thereby, is substantially balanced on the legsof the pedestal, and that there is a substantial overhang or the pedestal on each side of said plane. Each of the front legs is prefcrably set back from the front bottom edge of its pedestal, a substantial distance to pre-,

vent interference with the feet of the user,

and to prevent interference with articles on the floor near the desk, and to afford a clearance around the desk, making it possible, for example, to accommodate small waste paper baskets, or other desk accessories, be and under the desks. Each of the rear legs is preferably similarly set in substantially he same distance from the rear bottom edge of itspedestal, for a similar purpose, giving the structure a symmetrical appearance. As a result of this construction, when the pedestals 10 and 11 are secured to the desk top 12, they are rigidly maintained in vertical position by said top, and the legs are therefore-rigidly held in vertical position to sup port the weight of the pedestals and of the other desk parts carried by the pedestals .In this manner, although the desk is provided with only four legs, the weight of the desk is distributed on and supported by the l gs, quite as effectively as is the case where each pedestal is provided with four legs. Furthermore, in cases requiring the use of a large number of desks, for'example in large oilices, where the desks are arranged end to end as illustrated in Fig. 1, or end to end and back to back as illustrated in F ig. 7, it will observed that a'substantial clearance space is provided between the legs let of each desk and the legs 13 of an adjacent desk, which permits the ready insertion between the legs of the adjacent desks, of any usual cleaning implement, in cleaning the floor under the desks. It will also be observed that as a result of therebeing but four legs per desk, the number of obstructions in the path of any cleaning implement used, is but half what it is where four legs per pedestal are employed, which is a considerable advantage in connection with cleaning the floor under the desks, where a large number of desks is used. As illustrated in Fig. 4, for a sanitary pedest-a1 desk of a kind commonly used heretofore, the desk consists of pedestals 20 and 21 secured to a desk top 22,'the pedestal 20 being provided with four legs 23 which are the corner posts, of the frame of'the pedestal 20, the pedestal 21 being similarly provided with four legs 24, so that each pedestal has stable support, and serves effectively as a column supporting the desk top 22, but no nore so than do the pedestals of my improved construction. When a large number of desks of the construction in Fig. 4 are used together, for example end to end as illustrated in Fig. 2, or end to endand back to back as illustrated in Fig.5, the end legs 2% of each pedestal are closely adjacent the end legs 23 of an adjacent desk, the amount of clearance space between these end legs being so small as to prevent the insertion of floor cleaning implements between them, for example mops or floor brushes of the kind ordinarily employed in cleaning large floors. vThis leaves many uncleaned and unsanitary areas on the floor, unless special cleaning means involving much additional work, areemployed, all of which is avoided'by my improved construction.

In Fig. 6, 1 illustrate in plan view, four desks 32, 32place'dend to end and back to back, each of said desks having two corner legs 33, 3.3; at one end and two corner legs 34;, 3% atits other end. This, view shows the small amount of separation between any leg 33 and an adjacent leg 34 of any adjoining desk.

WVhile the disadvantages above described resulting from usingdesks ofprevious constructions in single rows, end to end, as illus:

trated in Fig. 2, are serious, when such desks are used in double rows, endto end and back.

to back, as illustrated in Figs. 5 and6, as is frequently done to economize floor space,

the disadvantages pointed out are much more serious; for, with the arrangement illustrated in either Fig. 5 or Fig. 6, it will be observed that under the four adjacent corners of each group of four desks, there is a small area or space practically surrounded by the adjacent corner legs of the four desks, wa'ch space can only be cleaned'by reaching between two of said adjacent and closely spaced corner legs, and, furthermore, to effect any cleaning whatever of said space, it is necessary to reach un der one of the desks and the entire distance from front to rear of the desk, before the said space is reached, making thorough cleaning of said space practically impossible. When it is realized that Figs. 5 and 6 are illustrative of small portions of long double rows of desks which are frequently used in the arrangement referred to, and that such an enclosed small space is produced for each four adjoining desks, the difhculty of maintaining sanitary conditions will be appreciated. VVit-h desks of the kind illustrated in Figs. 5 and 6, I find that the separation of adjacent legs of adj oining desks, represented by the dimension (Z, is frequently no more than from one to two inches; with my invention, on the other hand, the separation of adjacent legs of adjoining desks, represented by the dimension D in Fig. 7, may be much greater, for example, from fourteen to eighteen inches, depending on the size of the desk. to thoroughly clean under desks involving my invention, when they are closely grouped as described.

From the above, it will appear that by my invention I provide an improved sanitary desk structure quite as efie'ctive in every way as sanitary desk structures heretofore used, and with considerable reduction in cost of the desks and marked advantages in cleaning the floor under the desks, as well as increased useful floor space under the desks, where the desks are used closely together.

While I have shown my invention in the particular embodiment above described, it will be understood that I do not limit myself to this exact construction as I may employ equivalents known to the art at the time of the filing of this application without departing from the scope of the appended claims.

What I claim is:

1. In a sanitary desk construction adapting said desks for use end to end and back to back closely together in rows, a desk top, a pedestal secured to each end portion of said top, two legs supporting each pedestal a substantial distance from a fioor for cleaning purposes under said pedestal, and a cross member secured to the bottom portion of each of said pedestals for each of its legs and extending longitudinally of the desk, each of said legs bein secured to the mid-portion of one of said cross members, and said cross members for each of said pedestals being This affords ample room' spaced substantial distances inwardly from 1 the bottom front and rear edges of said ped estal, whereby when a plurality of saiddesks are placed endto end orback to back or both, substantial clearance spaces are provided between all adjacent legs of different ones of said desks for cleaning purposes under the corresponding pedestals; V

2. In a sanitary desk construction adapting said desks for use end to end and back to back closely together in rows, a desktop,'a pedestal secured to each end portion of said top, two legs supporting each-pedestal a sub stantial distance from a floor for cleaning purposes under said pedestal, and a cross member secured to the bottom portion of each of said pedestals for each of its legs and ex tending longitudinally of the desk, each of said legs being secured to the mid-portion of one of said cross members, whereby when a plurality of said desks are placed closely together in a row, substantial clearance spaces are provided between adjacentlegs of different ones of said desks for cleaning purposes under the corresponding pedestals. I

3. In a sanitarydesk costruction adapting said desks for use end to endand back to back closely together in rows, a desk top, a pedestal secured to each end portion of said top, two legssupporting each pedestal a sub stantial distance from a floor for cleaning purposes under said pedestal, and members secured to the bottom portionsof said pedestals to support said legs, each or. said legs being secured to one of said members under the mid-portion of the corresponding pedestal longitudinally of the desk, whereby when a plurality of said desks are placed closely together in a row, substantial clear? ance spaces are provided between ad acent legs of different ones of sa1d desks for cleaning purposes under the corresponding pedestals. p

4c. In a sanitary desk construction adapting said desks for'use end to end and back to back closely together in rows, a desk top, a

pedestalsecured to each end portion of said top, wo legs supporting each pedestal a substantial distance from a floor for cleaning purposes under said pedestal, and members secured to the bottom portions of 'said pedestals tosupport said legs, each of said legs being secured-to one of said members under the mid-portion of the corresponding pedestal longitudinally of the desk, whereby when a plurality of said desks are placed closely together in a row, substantial clearance spaces are provided between adjacent legs of different ones of said desks for cleaning purposes under the corresponding pedestals, said front and back legs being spaced substantial distances inwardly from the bottom front and rear edges respectively of the pedestals to which they are secured.

5. In a sanitary desk construction adaptinn, .Lut,

a la ing said desks for use end to end and back to back closely together in rows, a desk top, a pedestal secured to each end portion of said top, and two legs supporting each pedestal Q a substantial distance from a floor for clean- 7 "'ing purposes under said pedestal and secured to said pedestal substantial distances from its outer'vertical end wall whereby when a pluralityof said desks are placed closely together in a row, substantial clearance spaces are provided between adjacent legs of different ones of said desks for cleaning purposes under the corresponding pedestals.

6. In a sanitary desk construction adapting said desks for use end to end and back to back closely together in rows, a desk top, a pedestal secured to each end portion of said top, and two legs supporting a each pedestal a substantial distance from floor for cleaning purposes under said pedestal and secured to said pedestal substantial distances from its'outer vertical end wall, said front and back legs being spaced substantial distances inwardly from the bottom front and rear'edges respectively of the pedestals to which they are secured, whereby when a plurality of said desks are placed end to end or back to back or both, substantial clearance spaces areprovided between all adjacent legs of different ones of said desks for cleaning purposes under the corresponding pedestals.

'In a sanitary desk construction, the

combination of a desk top, a. pedestal secured to and supporting one end of said desk top, a support for the other end of said desk top, and two legs secured to and supporting said pedestal, said legs being substantially midway between the outer and inner end walls of said pedestal and spaced inwardly 4 substantial distances from the bottom front and rear edges of said pedestal.

8. In asanitary desk construction, the combination of a desk top, a pedestal secured to and supporting each end of said desk top,

and two legs secured to and supporting each of said pedestals, said legs of each pedestal being substantially mid-way between the outer and inner end walls of the corresponding pedestal and spaced inwardly substantial distances'from the bottom front and rear edges of the corresponding pedestal.

'In witness whereof, I hereunto subscribe my name this 6th dayof February, A. D.

1932; a 5 CHARLES B. ULRICH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2612421 *May 20, 1947Sep 30, 1952James Bargen WilliamDesk
US2694614 *Dec 29, 1950Nov 16, 1954Clarence H DentMultiple desk unit
US4040692 *Jun 6, 1975Aug 9, 1977Sass Daniel BConvertible multipurpose table
US4798423 *Jan 7, 1987Jan 17, 1989Lacour IncorporatedModular desk system
US5746488 *Oct 12, 1995May 5, 1998Lacour,Inc.Stressed modular desk system
US5954409 *May 4, 1998Sep 21, 1999La Cour IncorporatedStressed modular desk system
US5975657 *Sep 29, 1997Nov 2, 1999Lacour IncorporatedFlexible desk system
US6050659 *Jan 30, 1998Apr 18, 2000Lacour IncorporatedFrame-type desk system
Classifications
U.S. Classification312/194, 312/351.8, 312/198
International ClassificationA47B17/00, A47B17/03
Cooperative ClassificationA47B17/033
European ClassificationA47B17/03B