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Publication numberUS1887429 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 8, 1932
Filing dateSep 2, 1931
Priority dateSep 2, 1931
Publication numberUS 1887429 A, US 1887429A, US-A-1887429, US1887429 A, US1887429A
InventorsPrice Joe W
Original AssigneePrice Joe W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Propeller construction
US 1887429 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

NOV. 8, 1932. 1 w PRICE 1,887,429

vPIROPELLER CONSTRUCTION l Filed Sept. 2, 1931 IIIIHIIIIIW wel Jae WHW I INVENTOR BY l r ATTORNEY Patented Nov. 8, 1932 View therethrough.

UNITED STATES JOE W. PRICE, OF, C ANON, COLORADO;

r-ROPELLER consifnncrron Y i Application med septemberl 2,1931. ,"seriaimi. 560,842,

The invention relates to a propeller construction for airplanes or the like, and more especially to multiple Vpropellers and driving mechanism therefor.

The primary object of the invention is the provision of a propeller construction of the character specified wherein an increased speed and maximum carrying power is hadk in the use thereof with an airplaneor the like, the arrangement of the multiple propellers and the Vdriving mechanism thereof being novel in form. v

vision of a propellerconstruction of the'character specified, wherein the take-off of the airplane can be effected much faster andalso in a minimum space and also when said airplane or the like is in flight, the slipping thereof or other dangers arising when encountering air pockets will be eliminated.

vision of a propeller construction of the character specified, wherein theuse of the same' cient in operation, practical in all details and inexpensive to manufacture and install.

View, the invention consists in the features of construction, combination and arrange- Vment ofparts, as will be hereinafter more fully described in detail, illustrated in theV drawing which discloses the preferred embodiment of the invention, and pointed out in the claim hereunto appended.

In the accompanying drawing :e

Figure 1 is a fragmentary front elevation of a propeller construction in accordance with the invention. Y Y

Figure 2 is a vertical longitudinal sectional Figure 3 is a sectional View on the line 3-#3 of Figure 2, looking in the direct-ion of the arrows. Y

' Figure 4 sectionalvie'w on the-,lineff-t Vof'Fh-H1925 lOkngiin the ldirection of the` arrows;v y A- *Similar reference characters indicatev cor-v responding parts "throughout the4 severalVV 55 iviews"inthedrawing;` Y v A 7 Referring to the Vdrawing in detail, 5 desgnates the forward projecting portion of the drive shaft of an airplane motorl (not t shown), the latter beingof any ppreferred'o ystandard"construction and onfthe outer end Y Vof this shaft is fixed in any suitable manner Another kobj ect of the invention is the prothe'hollow hub 6 of amaster propellerl. hav- 8l meshing with apinion 9 supported vfor rotation upon' a. journal lOfformed" on'anfarm 11 of a. stationaryY sleeve-likelho'usin'g ,12, the.4 "latter 'encirclfingfa` sleeve-like` shaft 13 car-` Y v"ri-ed by'the driveshaft 5. A. further object of the invention is the pro- The forward' 'einer 'the lSiente-111m Arranged rearwardlyofthemast'er propeller Vand spaced therequired'distance in- :wardly therefrom -is theinner auxiliary pro; `V`peller, including a hollow hub 15 Y provided B0 in construction, thoroughly reliable and efli 'counter-balancingipinion 'A17'onla journal 18 Y ofthe arm 19; projected ,from ayst'ationary With the foregoing and other objects in housing20-fencircling a sleeve-like shaft 21 formed integralI with the hub 15 of,` the aux-4 55 Y iliary propeller. It is, Vof course, lunderstood that'the yhub 15 is'rprovided withvopposed n i 'propeller blades." 22 i andthe forward or out- -ermost end ofthe sleeve-like shaft 21 is peller, including ahollow hub 27 provided 95 i with opposed propeller blades 28, the hub being formed with internal gears ,-29 and 30V opposite one another, the gear 29 being in mesh with a pinion 31V carried by a journal 32 of an arm 33 on the housing v 12, while theA 10F shaft 1'3' is formed 'with a `gear lllwhich fis confined with the hub `e of themaster propeller and v I )meshes 'with thefpinion 9 fso that rotation Vimparted[from the lmaster propeller tothe 'i5V :sleeve-like shaft 13,'as Vwill be obvious;

gear 30 meshes with the pinion 24 on the arm 26 of the housing 20. The pinion 3l acts correspondingly to the pinion 17, namely, as a counter-balancing pinion, while transmission of power from the mas'ter propeller is eifected to the auxiliary inner and intermediate propellers through the pinionslO and 24 and the internal gears of thel hubs of the l'said master propeller and intermediate propeller.

It will be observed that in the startingof the motor in the aeroplane, the drive shaft 5 will turn the master propeller and through 'l its internal gear 8, power will be transmitted through the pinion 10 to the gear 14 on Y the sleeve shaft 13 to the hub 27 of the in! j termediate propellerpand the latter, through vthe gear `80, will impart power by transmission through the pinion 24 and gear 23 to c the sleeve shaft 21 and thence/tol the inner propeller, so that in the use of thelmultiple propellers, an increased speedvof travel is had and a maximum carrying capacity of power effected for the airplane.V i Y It will be apparent that the master and the innermost `auxiliary propeller rotate in the same direction, while the intermediate auxiliary propeller turns in a reverse direction, and 1n this manner, 1n the use of the n multiplepropeller construction, the speed of the airplane is boosted to eiiect a quick takec oil? and lto relieve danger as well as the slipping of the airplane when encountering air pockets during flight. j Y

Itis of course to be understood that in the manufacture of the structure hereinbefore described the main shaft 5 will have its bearing encased so asto contain oil for lubricat- Y ing purposes and likewise the gearing in its arrangement will -be encased for receiving oil so that such gearing will constantly travel in a bath of oil for the proper lubrication.

of the construction. y. Y W hat lsclaimed 1s i i In a propeller constructiomfamotor drive shaft,a seriespoi' spaced propellers having internally gear toothedhubsV mounted upon, said shaft, means ixing the *hubV of one prof peller to said shaft, sleeve-like-shafts.formed with the vhubs of the remaining propellers and encircling said drive shaft, gears formed l on the sleeve-like shafts, stationary housings receiving the sleeve-like shafts, and pinions supported by said housings and meshing with the internally gear toothed hubs and the vgearsA on the sleeve-like shafts. In testimony whereof IV ai'ix Inysignature.

' J OE PRICE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2437399 *Jan 25, 1945Mar 9, 1948Morgan James FMultiple airscrew driven from a common shaft
US2531032 *Dec 17, 1938Nov 21, 1950Hyacinthe Desmoulins EmilePropelling mechanism
US2679907 *May 18, 1950Jun 1, 1954United Aircraft CorpDual rotation coaxial propeller mechanism
US4464095 *Jun 25, 1982Aug 7, 1984Kango IidaHydraulic energy converter
US4563129 *Dec 8, 1983Jan 7, 1986United Technologies CorporationIntegrated reduction gear and counterrotation propeller
US4604032 *Jun 20, 1984Aug 5, 1986Ab Volvo PentaRotor device
US5791592 *Jan 18, 1995Aug 11, 1998Nolan; Herbert M.Helicopter with coaxial counter-rotating dual rotors and no tail rotor
US6460802Sep 13, 2000Oct 8, 2002Airscooter CorporationHelicopter propulsion and control system
US6886777Feb 14, 2001May 3, 2005Airscooter CorporationCoaxial helicopter
US7198223Feb 14, 2002Apr 3, 2007Airscooter CorporationUltralight coaxial rotor aircraft
US8668618Jul 15, 2011Mar 11, 2014Christopher C. SappenfieldRotary units, rotary mechanisms, and related applications
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Classifications
U.S. Classification416/129
International ClassificationB64D35/06, B64D35/00
Cooperative ClassificationB64D2700/62824, B64D35/06
European ClassificationB64D35/06