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Publication numberUS1888172 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 15, 1932
Filing dateJun 6, 1932
Priority dateJun 6, 1932
Publication numberUS 1888172 A, US 1888172A, US-A-1888172, US1888172 A, US1888172A
InventorsJoha Elmer N
Original AssigneeReliable Knitting Works
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Knitted footwear and method of making the same
US 1888172 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' NOV. 15, 1932. E, N JOHA 1,888,172

KNITTED FOOTWEAR AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME Filed June 6. 1932 Snventor f i M WM Gttorneus Patented Nev. 1s, 11932 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE ELMIEB,l N. J'OHA, OF WAUWATOSA, WISCONSIN, ASSIGNOB TO RELIABLE KNITTING i WORKS, Ol' MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN, A CORPORATION OF WISCONSIN XNITTED FOOTWEAR AND METHOD OF lMAKING TEE SAME application med :une s,

My invention relates to improvements in knitted footwear and methods of making the same. In a com anion application, Serial No. 579,923, tiled ecember 9, 1931, for knitted foot coverings and methods of making the same, I have disclosed afoot coverin which may be manufacturedfrom a strip o knitted fabricf cut to the desiredlength and having zigzag selvedged side margins which are stitched together in such a manner that the ends of the blank form the ankle opening or top of the shoe, the middle portion forms the sole, and the wales or ribs extend vertically in the upper. Such blanks are cut from a continuous strip of knitted material, and therefore the ends require to be covered by an ankle encircling binding.

Objects of the invention herein disclosed are to provide -an improved form of knitted blank, and to also provide means for utilizing such blanks to form knitted shoes having improved toe and instep covering portions, ankle embracing portions provided with selvedged margins, and all cut edges connected and, if desired, concealed at the heel. p

Further objects are to provide a novel form of blank from which articles of footwear may be constructed which not only have selvedged edges at the ankle and cut ends stitched together to form the heel portions, but to provide a form of blank having zigzag portions peculiarly adapted to have their selvedged margins connected to form shoe toes with as# sociated uppers, having wales or ribs extending from toe to heel and obliquely upwardly to the center line of the instep in such a manner as to utilize the tension of the threads to the best advantage for comfort, and for permanent conformity to the shape of the. foot.

Further objects of my invention are to provide knitted footwear of improved shape, app pearance, and durability; to provide means for reenforcing the heel and sole portions of such footwear to produce shoes having substantially impervious soles and continuously knitted uppers with selvedged ankle encircling margins; to provide blanks which may be made and sold as a commercial product of knitting mills for use by shoe manufacturers in the construction of footwear; and in gen- 1932. Serial No. 815,605.

eralto provide meanswhereby knitted fabrics of zlgzag herringbone attern and novel form may be utilized in t e production of improved knitted footwear. t

In the drawing Figure 1 is a view of a strip of continuously knitted fabric having one end portion severed and constituting my improved footwear forming blank. i

Figure 2 is a perspective view of the blank after its ends have been connected to form a heel portion. s

Figure 3 is a view of the same with portions connected to form a shoe toe, and with the loilwer margin shaped for connection witha so e. y

Figure 4 is a perspective view of acompleted article of footwear formed by stitching together the lower selvedged margins of the blank to form a sole.

Figure 5 is a view of a modified form of footwear in which the lower selvedged margins of the partially formed shoe shown in Figure 3 have been only artially connected, the heel portion being le t open to allow the device to be slipped over an ordinary shoe-v for service asa foot warmer.

Figure 6 is a side view ofa shoe having a leather sole and a knitted upper formed from the'blank shown in Figure 1 after it hasl been shaped and portions connected by stitching, as illustrated in Figure 3, the completed shoe being shown in Figure 6 on an enlarged scale with heel and toe portions broken away in vertical section. y

Like parts are identified by the same reference characters throughout the several views.

In the manufacture of my knitted foot wear blanks I knit a continuous strip in a rack stitch of the familiar zigzag type, but I knit this strip in the form of an elongated band 10 extending obliquely across the general longitudinal axis of the strip, whereupon I reverse the inclination of the strip and knit a short extension 11 substantially at right angles to said band. I then again reverse the direction and knit a second short extension 12 parallel to the band 10, followed by a third reversal in the direction of inclination, c afterwhich I stitch a second elongated band 13 extending obliqiiely across the general longitudinal axial line of the strip substantially at right angles to the first mentioned band. A f I Upon completing the band 13, if additional blanks are desired, I continue the knitting in the same direction to produce a second band member 10 with associated zigzag extensions 11 and 12 which to connect this second band member 410 with a second band member 13. Y

The second band member 10 will be inclined in the opposite direction from that of the first band member 10, and the second band member 13 vwill of course be parallel to the rst band`member 10. The zigzag extensions will, therefore, occur alternately on opposite sides of the general axial line of the strip. j

The knitting of these bands and their connecting zigzag extensions may thus continue indefinitely. The ends of the associated bands and the connecting zigzag extensions form in each instance two projecting triangular points on the outer side of the angle formed by .the adjacent bands .and a single centrally located triangular point at the in. v

ner side of the angle, which is the converse of the V-shaped notch between the two points on the outer side.

By making the intermediate band strips of a length double that required for the article of footwear to be formed from this knitted fabric, I am able to sever these band strips midway of their respective ends to produce.

. blanks having the form indicated at the left in Figure 1. The line of seyeraiice will,.of course, correspond to an imaginary line forming the junction of the members 10 and i 13. It will/be observed that each of the v the edge margins being selvedged except at the cut ends of the blank.

By then connecting or stitching together the cut ends of the blank as indicated at 15 in Figure 2 and liftin the zigzag extensions 11 and 12 the two triangular projections 16 Y and 17 may have their margins stitched to- "toa V.es

gether to form a shoe toe, as indicatedk `in Figure 3. The portions 11 and 12 will then constitute the instep covering portion ffpthe upper, and the single triangular projection 16 will extend upwardly along the instep point above the selvedged 'top margins 17 and 18 which embrace the ankle.

footwear, said blank havin i margins andecomprisi-ng o liquely pitched 'lhe kcoiwergent end portioiisvconiie'c at their opposite margins 19 and 20 of the band ingtaibers 10 and 13 ma be turned inwardly and stitched together t roughout their length, as indicated in Figure 4, or for a portion of their length from`the toe backwardly, thus leaving a heel opening, as clearly vshown in Figure 5. This heel portion is left open if the footwear is to be used as a foot warmer to be slipped over an ordinary shoe. When the article is used as a foot warmer it is desirable to allow the heel of the shoe'to pro- ]ect through the opening, as shown at A in Figure 5.

If desired, the partially completed shoe illustrated in Figure 3 may have the lower margins of the members 1() and 13 secured to a sole 25 formed of leather or other suitable material. Inl that event the lower margins of the members 10 and 13 will be slightly inturned, as indicatedV in Figure 3, and secured to the upper surface of the sole 25 by anysuitable means, preferably by cementing these selvedged edges to the leather sole and covering them with an insole 26 which may also be cemented to the marginal portions interposed between the insole margins `and the sole 25. A Waterproof celluloidal cement will be preferred, although rubber cement may be used. .The insole `may also be cemented directly to the sole 25 in the Acentral portion between the engaged margins of the knitted material.

A strip 28 of any suitable material may be cemented or otherwise secured to the inner surface of th'e lieel portion to reenforce the heel, and if desired, a similar strip 29 may be secured to the outer surface to cover the stitched joint 15. Also, the instep` covering portions 11 and 12 will preferably be reenforced by lines of stitching 30 at their junctions with 'the end portions 10 and 13, respectivel This stitching and also the reversal of t e directional pitch of the ribs or walesalong-these lines and along the center line of theinstep, which also has an elastic reenforcing effect, serve to prevent bagging and cause the footwear to conform to the foot of the wearer. I

If the knitted fabric is formed with a rib stitch theribs will extend longitudinally in the upper along` the sides of the shoe and upwardly'and inwardly from each side to the center line of the instep at the junction of the zigzag extensions .11 and 12. The triangular upward projection at the top of the instep will not only provide an attractive feature, but this projection may be utilized as a pull-on piece and as a meansl for prote'ctingthe front of the ankle."`

'TI claim:

1. .Ars `a new article of manufacture, a knitted blank from which to manufacture selvedged side Aanni'ergent ends 4by relatiyely"VW ig-zag extensions forming a pair of triangular projections at the outer side of the angle formed by the end portions, with a central triangular projection at the inner side of such angle, the end portions being of substantially the length of the footwear to be formed from the blank, and the zigzag connecting portions being adapted to form the instep covering portion of the upper. j

2. As anew article of manufacture, a knitted blank from which to construct footwear, comprising elongated convergent end portions adapted to form sides for the article of footwear, said end portions having wales running longitudinally, and a zigzag instep covering portion having wales extending obliquely from each end portion to the center line of the blank, and threads being continuous with those of the end portions.

3. As a new article of manufactureaa continuously knitted blank from which to construct footwear, comprising a zigzag strip having a central portion, the wales of which extend obliquely 'and' divergently from the center line of the blank, elongated end portions having wales oblique to their associated wales in the central portion, and transverse reenforcing stitching at the-junctions of the end portions with the instep covering portion.

4. As a new article of manufacture,V a knitted blank from which to construct footwear, comprising an instep covering portion having zigzag wales extending upwardly from each side to the center line of the'instep,

and elongated end portions adapted to form sides for the article of footwear, said end portions having wales running longitudinally and their threads being continuous with those of the zigzag instep covering portions, the wales of the end ortions and associated instep covering portionsmbeing extended at their junctions to form a pair of triangular projections adapted to be stitched together to form a toe covering.

5, The process of making knitted footwear consisting in continuously rack knitting a blank forming strip composedA of bands extending alternately in oppositely pitched directions oblique to the general center line of thestrip, and comprising single bands each of approximately double the desire length of the footwear, and interposed short oppositely pitched bands of` a combined area c sufficient to comprise the instep and toe portions; medially severing said long bands tb form blanks having elongated end portions connected by relatively short zigzag instep and toe covering portions; stitching the severed ends together to form a heel and stitching the oblique margins of the toe covering portions together to form a toe; and then connecting the lower selvedged edges of the relatively long bands to form a sole.

6. The process of making knitted footwear consisting in rack knitting a blank having.

`elongated end portions converging in one direction and connected at their covergent ends by relatively short portions having wales obliquely pitched in opposite directions in the respective portions, and with the Wales of each central portion pitched in a direction opposite to that of thewales in the associated end portion, whereby the central portion of the blank is provided with two triangular projections on the outer side of the angle formed by the'end portions and al single central triangular projection on the inner side of such angle, then connecting the other ends of said end portions to form a heel and stitching together the selvedged marg'insof said pair of triangular projections -to form a toe.

7.' The process of making knitted footwear consisting in rack knittingl a blank having elongated end portions converging in one direction and connected at their convergent ends by relatively short portions having -wales obliquely pitched in `opposite directions in the respective portions, and with the wales of each central portion pitched in a direction opposite to that ofthe wales in the associated end portion, whereby the central portion of the blank is provided with two triangular projections on the outer side of the angle formed by the end portions and a single central ltriangular projection on the inner side of such angle, then connecting the other ends of said end portions' to form a heel, stitchingv together the selvedged margins` of said pairy of triangular projections to form a' toe and inserting a reenforcing thread along the junction lines of the end'portions with the relatively short zigzag centralportions.

8. Knitted footwear having selvedged ankle embracing portions, an instep covering portion having wales pitched in opposite directions from acenter line, and side portions having wales continuous with the ,zigzag instep covering portion and extending parallel .j

to the selvedged anklev encasing margin, said side portions having their ends connected to form a heel.

9. Knitted footwear comprisinganinstep f covering portion having wales pitched in opposite directions from a center line and side portions having wales extending longitudinally, said 'sideportions being connected with each other at the heel and having selvedged instep embracing margins.

1()., Knitted footwear comprising an instep covering portion having wales pitched in opposite directions from a center line and side portions having wales extending longitudinally, said side portions being connected with each other at the heel and having selvedged instep embracing margins, and an auxiliary reen forcing thread extending along the junction lines of the instep covering por-.

tions with said side portions.

11. Knitted footwear comprising continuouslyI knitted instep covering portions and side portions having wales pitched in opposite directions with the wales in the instep covering portions extending downwardly and forwardly from a a centerline, with the'outer margins selvedged and stitched together to form a toe, composed in part of such portions and in part of the associated ends of the side portions, said side portions having their opposite ends connected at the heel with their upper selvedged edges forming an ankle1 embracing margin for the footwear, and their lover selvedged edges connected to form a so e.

12. Knitted footwear having wales extending longitudinally in the side portions and in the lower portions of the toe and-convergently upwardly in the upper part of the toe portions and instep 'covering portions to the center line of the instep, said knitted portions of the footwear having selvedged top and bottom margins.

ELMER N. JOHA.'

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2679117 *Oct 3, 1950May 25, 1954Ripon Knitting WorksArticle of footwear and method of making the same
US7347011 *Mar 3, 2004Mar 25, 2008Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a textile upper
US7814598 *Feb 18, 2008Oct 19, 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a textile upper
US8015731 *Jan 1, 2008Sep 13, 2011Bettye JacksonInterchangeable fashion covering for a high heel shoe
US8042288Sep 10, 2010Oct 25, 2011Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a textile upper
US8209883Jul 8, 2010Jul 3, 2012Robert Michael LydenCustom article of footwear and method of making the same
US8266749Sep 20, 2011Sep 18, 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a textile upper
US8448474Feb 20, 2012May 28, 2013Nike, Inc.Article of footwear incorporating a knitted component with a tongue
US8490299Dec 18, 2008Jul 23, 2013Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having an upper incorporating a knitted component
US8522577Mar 15, 2011Sep 3, 2013Nike, Inc.Combination feeder for a knitting machine
US8595878Aug 2, 2010Dec 3, 2013Nike, Inc.Method of lasting an article of footwear
US8621891May 17, 2012Jan 7, 2014Nike, Inc.Article of footwear incorporating a knitted component with a tongue
DE102012206062A1Apr 13, 2012Oct 17, 2013Adidas AgSchuhoberteil
EP2649898A1Mar 27, 2013Oct 16, 2013adidas AGShoe upper
Classifications
U.S. Classification66/177, 36/9.00R, 36/11, 66/171, 36/7.2
International ClassificationA43B1/00, A43B1/02
Cooperative ClassificationA43B1/02
European ClassificationA43B1/02