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Publication numberUS1888980 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 29, 1932
Filing dateNov 24, 1930
Priority dateNov 24, 1930
Publication numberUS 1888980 A, US 1888980A, US-A-1888980, US1888980 A, US1888980A
InventorsWilliam K Dingledine
Original AssigneeWilliam K Dingledine
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game
US 1888980 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

w. K. D!NGLED|NE Original Filed Nov. 24, 1930 5 an? Ag i a? a. I

Nov. 29, 1932.

ATTORNEY Patented Nov. 29, 1932 UNITED STATES WILLIAM R. DINGLEDINE, OF BROOKLYN, NEW YORK GAME Application filed November 24, 1930, Serial No. 497,793. Renewed October 1, 1932.

This invention relates to a'game'of the type in which the primary playing elements or pieces are moved at intervals over a playing board suitably constructed and marked as hereinafter described.

In games of this type the element of uncertainty is usually obtained by a means for determining by chance the number of spaces over which the respective players are allowed to move their respective pieces, such as dice, spinning arrows rotatably mounted on dials, and the like. A further element of uncertainty has been'introduced sometimes by stipulating that in the event of a playing piece being moved on any of certain spaces marked on the playin board penalties or handicaps are imposed. In all such games, however, the uncertainties are clearly defined and the hazards confronting the players are at all times visible.

It is an object of this invention to provide a simple and attractive game ofi'ering in greater degree the elements of surprise and uncertainty by injecting the factor of invis:

ible or unseen hazards. This is accomplished, as will hereinafter be described, by the use of a playing board containing concealed areas which automatically impose penalties or handicaps. It is a further object of this invention to provide such a game in a form inexpensive to manufacture, which, by appearance of the playing board, pieces and rules governing play, will realistically portray events or contests, such as military battles between men, aeroplanes, ships and the like, or a football game, racing contest, golf game and the like. Other objects and the nature of the invention will be better understood from a description of a particular embodiment illuso trating the principles of the invention. In

the embodiment selected for description, reference will be made to the drawings forming a art hereof, in whichig. 1 is a plan view of a playing board; Fig. 2 is a cross section through the playing board substantially along the line 2-2 in F i 1 and indicating a method of play;

ig. 3 is a front view of one type of playing piece, and a cross section through a portion'of the playing board; and

Fig. 4 is a plan view of one means for determining the number of moves to be made.

Referrin to the embodiment shown for the purposes o illustration, the playing board shown in F igs. 1 and 2 is constructed of cardboard, wood or other non-magnetic material ndicated at 5 to which magnetized steel playing pieces will not cling. Over certain. portions of this playing board or inlaid therein are placed and attached'by an adhesive, or other suitable means, thin pieces of iron or steel or other magnetic substance, indicated at 6, which will co-act with the magnetized playing pieces to hold them in an upright position. F or such thin pieces 6 a metallic sheet with holes cut therein may be substituted. Another alternative is to make the playing board 5 of a material to which magnetized playing pieces will adhere and insulate certain areas. The purpose of so con- 7 structing the playing board is to present a playing surface having magnetic and nonmagnetic areas which respectlvely attract and fail to attract the magnetized playing pieces. Over the entire surface, as shown in Fig. 1 and Fig. 2, is attached by a suitable adhesive or other means, a paper or cloth covering 12, which conceals the location of the magnetic and non-magnetic portions. This covering may be decorated in any desired way to repreas sent a battlefield, football gridiron, race track, etc., and marked old in spaces or other configurations to designate the positions to be occupied by the playing pieces as they are moved in playing the game. The playing piece 7 shown in Fig. 3 is made of steel or other magnetic material of appropriate size and magnetized, one leg 13 of the playing pieces being the north 'pole and the other leg 13 the south pole of the no magnet. The bottoms of the two legs are squared, so that the piece when placed adjacent a metal ma etic surface will stand erect, but when plac adjacent a wood, cardboard or other non-magnetic surface will not be attracted thereby and will not so stand erect.

In the embodiment shown for the pur ose of illustration, Fig. 1 represents a battle eld and Fig. 3 a soldier. The surface of the playing board, in Fig. 1, is marked in a series of obliged to stop in spaces paths 8 and spaces 9, which may be laid out in symmetrical form running at varying angles and joined to each other at diderent inter-- vals. The spaces 9 are of the correct size to accommodate one of the magnetized playing ieces 7 in an upright position, as shown in ig. 2. Directly under some of these spaces 9 is a magnetic undersurface 6, as before described, while under others is a cardboard or other non-magnetic undersurface 5, as before described. It is a parent that when a playing piece is place on or over an insulated or nonmagnetic space it will fall over, as shown (Fig. 2) at 14, and when it is placee. on a magnetic space it will stand erect as shown at 15.

Tn playing the game normally there would be two players. Each player would place his men at the starting positions along line B--B in Fig. 1 and by spinning the arrow shown in Fig. 4c, or using some other well lrnown device, he would ascertain how many moves his men would be entitled to make. Thus, if the point of the arrow stopped at numeral 1, his men would be advanced one space. The opposing player would then do the same thing to determine the number of moves to which he would be entitled. As the pieces are thus advanced at intervals across the board, some of them would normally be under which there is no magnetic material. These pieces would be unable to stand erect and by the rules of the game would be removed from the board. The winning of the game would be determined by the number of pieces lost by ones opponent, or the fallen pieces would be returned to the starting point and obliged to make a new start in which latter event the winning of the game would be determined by one player first succeeding in advancing all of his men to his opponents starting point.

Uther forms of games embodying this invention may have rules imposing other penalties for stopping a playing piece over a non-magnetic area. lit is apparent that many other suitable rules of play could be made for a game or games utilizing the invention claimed.

Tn order to better insure the pieces falling when placed on a non-magnetic space, provision is made for tilting the board at a slight an le by support in any desired direction, as ror example like that shown at 11 in Fig. 2

or by a plurality of supports located at any desired points between the playing board and the table.

The foregoing description of a particular embodiment is an illustration merely and is not intended to define the limits of the invention, and T recognize that many modifications of it are practicable without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention illustrated.

For example, my invention could be emneeaeeo bodied in a device comprising magnetized and non-magnetized concealed areas on the surface of the playing board, with magnetic pla ing pieces or elements.

What claim is:

1. A game comprising one or more permanently magnetized playing pieces adapted to be moved manually by the respective players, and a board over which said pieces are movable, said board having areas of magnetic and areas of non-magnetic material.

2. A game comprising one or more permanently magnetized playing pieces and a board over which said pieces are movable, said board having areas of magnetic and areas of non-magnetic material and a means frir inclining the surface of said board during p ay.

3. A game comprising one or more permanently magnetized playing pieces adapted to be moved manually by the respective players and a board over which said pieces are movable, said board having areas of mag-' netic and areas of non-magnetic material and a cover over the entire playing surface that renders said areas indistinguishable directly and indirectly by sight.

t. A game comprising one or more permanently magnetized playing pieces and a board over which said pieces are movable, said board having areas of magnetic and areas of non-magnetic material, a cover over the entire playing surface that renders said areas indistinguishable by sight and a means for inclining the surface of said board during play.

5. A game comprising one or more permanently magnetized playing pieces and a board over which said pieces are movable, said board having areas of magnetic and areas of non-magnetic material, a cover over the entire playing surface that renders said areas indistinguishable by sight, a means for inclining the surface of said board. during play and a means for determining the distance on the board. over which the said pla ing pieces are to be moved.

6. A. game comprising an inclined play ing surface and one or more playing pieces adapted to be moved manually over said surface, said surface having a plurality of areas to which said pieces will adhere and a plurality of areas to which said pieces will not adhere, the nature of said areas being indie tinguishable directly and indirectly by sight.

7. A game comprising a playing surface and one or more playing pieces adapted to be moved manually over said surface, said surface having a plurality of areas on which said pieces will stand erect and a plurality of areas on which said pieces will not stand erect, the natureof said areas being indistinguishable directly and indirectly by sight.

8. A game comprising a playing board having permanently magnetized and nonmagnetized areas, and a playin surface suerlm osed on said board to ren er said areas indistinguishable directly and indirectly from each other by sight and one or more playing pieces capable of being attracted by said ma netized areas said playing pieces being a apted to be moved manually over said playing surface.

9. A game comprising one or more permanent magnets as playing pieces, having one extremity the north pole and the other extremity the south pole of the magnet and adapted to adhere to a magnetic surface and a board having a plurality of areas of magnetic and non-magnetic material.

10. A game comprising one or more permanent magnets as playing pieces, having one extremity the north pole and the other extremity the south pole of the magnet, adapted to adhere to a magnetic surface, a board having a plurality of areas of magnetic and non-magnetic material and a cover superimposed over said board that renders said areas indistinguishable by sight.

In testimony whereof, I have'signed my name to this specification this 22nd day of November, 1930.

WILLIAM K. DINGLEDINE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2474365 *Jan 28, 1946Jun 28, 1949Elvin R MunnGame block of nonmagnetizable material having a magnetizable strip concealed in one end thereof
US2511774 *Aug 30, 1945Jun 13, 1950Robert H GoldsmithMagnetic game board and cover therefor
US2530896 *Dec 5, 1945Nov 21, 1950Christopher MetzMagnetic disk for shuffleboard tables
US2619349 *Jan 2, 1947Nov 25, 1952Abrahamson EdmundMagnetically operated game apparatus
US2729451 *Mar 29, 1954Jan 3, 1956Saml Gabriel Sons & CompanyChance controlled magnetic pieces and board game apparatus
US2819904 *May 17, 1956Jan 14, 1958Walter M NelsonGame board and playing pieces therefor
US3031193 *Nov 24, 1959Apr 24, 1962Henry J ChapmanGame apparatus
US3083020 *Jun 1, 1960Mar 26, 1963Wilford A TerschakGame device
US3232620 *Dec 4, 1962Feb 1, 1966Richard W FrenchMagnetic game apparatus
US3406974 *Apr 15, 1965Oct 22, 1968William D. NelsonGame board with magnets and game pieces with magnetically actuated pointer elements
US8042809Nov 4, 2009Oct 25, 2011Walker Digital, LlcLottery game card and method for conducting a lottery game
US20040036212 *Aug 27, 2003Feb 26, 2004Walker Jay S.Lottery game card and method for conducting a lottery game
US20060138725 *Feb 28, 2006Jun 29, 2006Alterix, Ltd.Interactive board game
US20120040732 *Oct 25, 2011Feb 16, 2012Walker Digital, LlcLottery game card and method for conducting a lottery game
US20160107078 *Aug 21, 2015Apr 21, 2016Dipole Games, LlcMagnetic Toss Game
DE1052284B *Feb 19, 1954Mar 5, 1959Reulein Fa GeorgSpielbrett mit Spielbahnen, Spielfiguren und Setzfeldern
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/239, 273/243, 273/248
International ClassificationA63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00075
European ClassificationA63F3/00A8