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Publication numberUS1892223 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 27, 1932
Filing dateJun 12, 1931
Priority dateJun 12, 1931
Publication numberUS 1892223 A, US 1892223A, US-A-1892223, US1892223 A, US1892223A
InventorsCesare Franco, Lorenzo Sansone
Original AssigneeCesare Franco, Lorenzo Sansone
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Percussion instrument
US 1892223 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

D66. 27, SANSQNE ET L PERCUSSION INSTRUMENT Filed June 12, 193l 2 Sheets-Sheet l M13101, 1 um 'I ll INVENTORS .54 61 Zora/2120 .fiausone Cesare fianro Dec. 27, 1932. 1.. SANSONE ET AL 1,892,223

PERCUSS I ON INSTRUMENT Filed Junel2. 193-1 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORS Zvnmzo jausane Cesare Want sY THEIRATTORN E ,7 Patented Dec. 27, 1932 STATES nonnnzo snnsonn AND'IGESARE rimnoo, on NEW YORK, N. Y.

mmouss on msm nnm Application filed June 12',

This invention relates to musical instruments of the perc'ussion group and more particularly to a percussion instrument which combines the qualities of a tympano and snare drum;

Two or three ofthe conventional tympani are-considered an essential part of any well balanced concert or symphony orchestra.

Likewise, a: snare drum is equally necessary and its use is frequently required. The space for the orchestra in the pit or on the stage is almost invariably limited and the'percussion instruments require moreis'pace than a great many other instruments.

1 i It is one of the principal objects of the present invention to provide a conventional tympanowhich,by' a rapidmanipulation 0 1e vers, may be converted into a snare drum,

. thereby enabling the space otherwise required for the snaredrum to be utilized for other purposes, and eliminating the necessity for transporting a snare drum when the orc'hestra is in transit.

Another objectof the'inventionis the pro 2 vision of a novel percussion instrument which is capable of producing all of thebeautiful effects of the tympano or tuned drum, and which may be converted into a percussion" instrument capable of producing thebrilliantystaccato effect of a snare drum, the change from one to the other being instan taneous and-effective. i v Still another object of the invention is the provision of simple means for attachment to 5 a conventional tympano whereby this snare drum effect may be secured.

Other'objects and advantages of the in-' vention will be hereinafter specifically point:

ed out, or will become apparent, as the 5 specificationproceeds.

With the above indicated objects in view, the invention resides in certain novel constructions and combinations and arrange ments of parts, clearly describedin the following specification and fully illustrated in the accompanying drawings, which latter show embodiments of the invention as at present preferred.

In said drawings; p 1

Fig. 1 is apartial top plan View of anon- 1931. Serial no. 543,785;

ventional tympano and showing, in broken lines, the embodiment mounted therein.

Fig. 2 is a vertical section taken substantlally through the center of a tympano' and showing a side elevationof the embodiment.

Fig. 3 is a plan view of the damper means.

Fig. 4 is a side elevation of same.

F ig. 5 is a perspective view of one end of the damper means and illustratingthe pre-' ferred method of securing the strings.

Fig. 6 is a perspective view of the opposite end of the damper means and showing the adjusting or tuning means for the strings.

Fig. 7 is a perspectiveview of the sliding" string carrier. g I

Fig. 8 is a perspective view of the foot pedal for actuating the device.

Referring now to said drawings by reference characters, the embodiment, as at present preferred, includes a damper member 10 and means for moving same into engagement with the under side of the head 11 of a conventional tympano or kettledrum 12.

v The usual tympani includes a relatively large semi-spherical metal body structure 13 7 which is mounted on a suitable stand or pedestal 14. The head ll ismade' from a suitable skin which is secured taut over a metal hoop, the hoop being drawn downwards over the upper edge of the body structure by means of a plurality of adjustable clamping members 15, this adjustingbeing required to produce the correct pitch or musical note when the instrument is played. lVhen the damper member, constructed in the manner hereinafter described, is moved into engagement with the lower surface of the headll and the head struck with snare drum sticks in that portion of the head engaged by the damper the resultingeffectis precisely the same as that obtained on a snare drum.

The dampermaybe constructed in a variety ofways. We prefer to employ a base member 16 constru ted of wood, metal, or other suitable material, one end of which carries ar'ectangular" clamp 17, on the top of which is mounted a U shaped channel member 18 which carries a piece of felt' or other resilient material 19', the latter forming a bridge over'which a plurality of strings 20 are suspended in spaced relation to the base member 16.

The clamp 17 also carries a U shaped block member 21 which extends over the end portion 22 of the base member. The strings are secured, at this end of the base member, between the end portion 21 of the block member 21 and a bar 23 which may be tightly drawn to the end portion 21 by m ans of a plurality of screws 24.

In order to provide means for adjusting the strings to the desired pitch the opposite ends of the strings are secured to a sliding string carrier 25, shown in detail in Fig. 7. This carrier includes side portions 26, an upper portion 27, a lower portion 28 having a cut away part 28; and an upturned string engaging portion 29, integral with the upper portion 27, and having a plurality of staggered string apertures 30. A U shaped channel member 31 is mounted on the upper portion 27 of the string carrier, just ahead of the string engaging portion, said channel member carrying a piece of felt 32 which likewise functions as a bridge for this end of the damper.

The following means are provided for adjusting the string carrier. A U shaped bracket 33 is secured, at its base 33, to the under side of the member 16. The vertical side portions 34 and 35 are provided with apertures 34 and 35 in which are carr ed a screw 36 which is provided with threads 37 at its outer end, a wing nut 38 being carried thereon, said bolt being secured at its opposite end to extension member 89 mounted on the under side 28 of said string carrier. As the wing nut is revolved the string carrier moves toward that end of the base member, thereby tightening said strings.

The strings 20 may be made from conventional gut or steel strings used on various musical instruments, depending upon the effect desired to be produced. e prefer to employ a relatively heavy gut string, which is wound with suitable aluminum, silver or steel wire. in order to produce the desired base effect.

The following means are provided for pivotally mounting and actuating the damper.

An angle bracket 42 is secured by means of bolts 43 to an annular flange member 44 which is mounted within a conventional tympano as a support for the ciamps 15.

The damper member is provided. on its under side, with two angle brackets 45 which secure said damper to a pair of diverging arms 45 which provide the mounting for the damper. These arms are pivotally mounted at 47 to the end of the angle bracket 42. A link 48 is pivotally carried at the opposite end of the arms 45 by means of a bolt 49, said link being connected to a lower link 50 by means of an adjustfng turnbuckle 51, the lower link having a ring portion 52 at its lower end.

The links are caused to move downwards, thereby raising the damper into engagement with the lower surface of the head 11 by means of a foot pedal 53. The foot pedal may be of any conventional design. \Ve prefer to employ a pedal having a base 54, a pedal member 55, hingedly connected to the base at 56, and a spring member 57 urging said pedal upwardly. The pedal member 55 carries a finger 58 which engages the ring portion 52 of the lower link. A stop member 59 confines the upward swing of the pedal member. The pedal is preferably provided with a bracket 60 with an aperture 60' to provide means for connecting the pedal to one of the feet 61 of the stand 14, as by a bolt 62.

The hereinbefore described construction admits of considerable modification without departin from the invention; therefore, it is the wish not to be limited to the precise arrangements shown and described, which are as aforesaid, by way of illustration merely. In other words the scope of prote tion contemplated is to be taken solely from the appended claims, interpreted as broadly as is consistent with the prior art.

We claim:

1. In combination with a percussion musical instrument having a head, a damper member mounted within said instrument and means for moving said damper member into engagement with the head of said instrument, said damper member including a supporting base, a plurality of strings in spaced relation thereto and means for mounting said strings on said supporting base, said means including, at one end of said base, a U shaped channel member and a piece of resilient material carried within said channel member forming a bridge for spacing said strings from said base, a block member at the end portion of said base for securing the ends of said strings, and, at the opposite end of said base, a sliding string carrier to which the opposite ends of said strings are secured, and means for adjustment of said string carrier longitudinally of the supporting base.

2. In combination with a drum and the like, a damper member and means for moving said damper member into engagement with the lower surface of the head of the drum, said damper member including a supporting base and a plurality of musical strings mounted taut on the upper surface thereof in spaced relation thereto, a lever pivotally mounted at its center within said drum, a link pivotally carried at one end of said lever, the damper member being rigidly mounted at the opposite end of said lever, and pedal operated means for drawing said link downwards, thereby bringing said damper said strings, said damper moving means mmember into engagement with the lower sur-' face of said drumhead. I

3. A device for attachment to a drum and the like including a damper member pivotally mounted within saiddrum and means for moving said damper into enga ement with the lower surface of the head 0 said drum,

said damper including a supporting base and a plurality of resonant strings mounted on the upper side of said base member in spaced relation thereto, and means for adjusting eluding a bracket member mounted within said drum, an arm pivotally mounted to said bracket, and foot pedal means for raising said dampermember into engagement with the lower surface of the head of the drum,

4. A device for attachment to a percussion musical instrument having a head, and including a damper member pivotally mounted Within said instrument and means for moving said damper into engagement with the lower surface of the head of said instrument,

saiddamper including a supporting base and a plurality of resonant strings mounted in spaced relation thereto, said damper moving means including a bracket member mounted within said drum, an armpivotally mounted at its center to said bracket, said damper member mounted at one end of said arm, and a link pivotally carried at the opposite end of said arm and a foot pedal connected with said link, whereby, when said foot pedal is depressed, the arm moves said damper member into engagement with the lower surface of the head of the drum.

5. A device for attachment to a drum and the like, including a damper member pivotally mounted within said drum and means for moving said damper into engagement with the lower surface of the head of said drum, said damper including a supporting base and a plurality of resonant strings mounted on the upper side of said base memberin spaced relation thereto, and means for stretching said strings, said damper movmg means including a bracket member mounted within said drum, an arm pivotally mounted at its center to said bracket, said damper member mounted at one end of said arm, and a link pivotally carried at the opposite end of said arm and a foot pedal connected with said link, whereby, when said foot pedal is depressed, the arm moves said damper member into engagement with the lower surface of the head of the drum.

Signed at New York city, in the county of New York and State of New York, this 6th day ofJune, A. D. 1931.

LORENZO SANSONE. CESARE FRANCO.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2834244 *Oct 21, 1955May 13, 1958Bom Bee Drums IncOrchestral and band drum with improved shell
US3951032 *Jul 23, 1974Apr 20, 1976Laporta Louis FMuffler-brakes for drums
US4278003 *Aug 20, 1979Jul 14, 1981Remo Inc.Pedal adjustable drum
US4314498 *Jun 17, 1980Feb 9, 1982Hofstad David PDrum having internal double acting control to provide variable pitch
US4377964 *Aug 3, 1981Mar 29, 1983Glassford Jr William EBass drum modulator
US5877440 *May 2, 1996Mar 2, 1999Chaffee; GaryAdjustable sound enhancing muffing device for percussion instrument background of the invention
US6043420 *Apr 27, 1999Mar 28, 2000Arnold; Richard N.Bass drum pillow muffle
US6177620 *Aug 19, 1999Jan 23, 2001Moris AlulyanSnare removing device for a drum
US6700046Apr 18, 2002Mar 2, 2004Wahan CherbettchianSnare-switch mechanism connected to the snareband of a snare drum
US7696422 *May 6, 2009Apr 13, 2010Remarkable CompanyHeelless instrument pedal device
DE10126914A1 *Jun 1, 2001Dec 5, 2002Wahan CherbettchianAbhebermechanismus für das Snareband einer Musiktrommel
DE10126914B4 *Jun 1, 2001Feb 9, 2006Wahan CherbettchianAbhebemechanismus für das Snareband einer Musiktrommel
Classifications
U.S. Classification84/419, 984/153, 84/417
International ClassificationG10D13/00, G10D13/04
Cooperative ClassificationG10D13/04
European ClassificationG10D13/04