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Publication numberUS1892664 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 3, 1933
Filing dateJan 21, 1930
Priority dateJan 21, 1930
Publication numberUS 1892664 A, US 1892664A, US-A-1892664, US1892664 A, US1892664A
InventorsHarry Eyles
Original AssigneeHarry Eyles
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spinning game
US 1892664 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. EYLES SPINNING GAME Jan. 3, 1933.

Filed Jan. 21, 1950 Patented Jan. 3, 1933 UNITED STATES rarsmr OFFICE HARRY EYLES, 0F CHICAGQILLINQIS SPINNING GAME Application filed January 21, 1930. SeriaI No. 422,394.

'10 step them indownward direction whereby to reveal such; indicia at all times.

A still further: object of the invention is to arrange the indicia of the disks in sections distributed about their center of rotation and radially registrable to produce different combinations of the indicia.

Another object of the invention is to form the series of disks with a cluster of perforations about the center of rotation, such perforations being adapted to register and recelve .a common element conducive to set all the disks in motion at once.

An additional object of the invention is to erect over-the center of the disk assembly a mechanism for manual use to impart rotation to one or more of the disks.

A significant object of the invention is to apply means tothe mechanism vaforesald whereby to station all the dISkS; at anyposition in their rotation.

. A final but nevertheless important object of the invention is to construct the novel game with parts of a simple and easily operated character, in order that the game may be J3 adapted for childrens use.

With the above objects in view and any others that may suggest themselves from the specification and claims to follow, a better understanding of the invention may be had .4 by reference to the accompanying drawing,

in which- Fig. 1 is a plan view of the novel game wherein the assembly of disks is shown. stationed at a certain period in theirtravel;

Fig. 2 is a similar view showing the position of the manual control after the disks have been putin motion;

Figs. 3 and 1, are respectively, magnified fragmentary sectionson the lines 33 and 44@ of Figure 1 andFigure 2 respectively;

Fig. 5 is a perspective view of the manual control.

Referring specifically to the drawing, 10 denotes a suit-able base or board which forms the foundation of the game. Bymeans of a screw 11 orother-fastening device, a vertical post 12- is secured over the board, this post being extended upwardly with a rod 13 of smallercross sectional dimensions, the rod being threaded into the post as indicated at :13aand having a head enlargement 13?) at its upper end. The, post 12 receives even with the shoulder defining its extension a cross head 14 of. substantial thickness and in elongated form. Near the ends, the-cross head 5 14 is recessed as indicated at Ma -to snugly seat the'lower. end of a ring .15, the upper edge of. this ringbeing even with the cross head at the siteof one of the recesses 14a and rising spirally-to the height of the, ring at the site of the other recess. .Herethe edge has a short horizontal section 15a, followed by an upward lug extension 15?) adjacent to the drop defining the origin of the spiral.

- Over the rod 13 is loosely disposed one end of a radial arm 16, the other end carrying-a pendent pin 17 which is at a point even with an aperture 14?) in thecross head 14 when distance fromthe center is considered. The aperture 1% is sufliciently spacious to permit the pin 17 to be dropped therethrough as indicated in Figure 3. The radialarm 16 is built up with a tubular column 18 about the L rod 13, the bore in the column being 35 slightly larger than that through the arm in order that the column may slide free over the headl3b of the rod 13. The bore in the arm, however, is too small to pass the head 13?) on the ascent of the colummso that the latter 1,90

cannot rise further than the height of the arm as limited by the head of the rod.

About the post 12 are loosely stacked a number of sheet metal disks 19, the smallest one of these being at the top and the balance progressing downwardly in diameter whereby to leave the outer portions of the disks exposed and permit game indicia on such portions to be viewed, as indicated in sections 1 and 2. The disks are spaced by ball bearings 20, that they may run freely and are perforated about the center with a cluster of apertures 19a, these registering in all the disks. Thus, when the radial arm 16 is down, it is possible to let the pendent pin 17 drop through a. row of registering apertures 19a as shown in Figure 3 and thus station all the disks against rotation.

In order to operate the game, the column 18 is used as a handle between the thumb and adjoining fingers, the column first being lifted high to retract the pin 17 from the apertures in the disks and the radial arm. It will be noted that the aperture 14b in the latter is at the origin of the spiral ring 15, so that when the pin has been lifted out of this aperture it may be again dropped to seek the next set of disk apertures 19a ahead. Since the disks are still with their apertures in regisration, it is an easy matter to drop the pin 17 through the next set of apertures in the manner suggested in Figure 1. However, in case the game apparatus has received a jolt or some vibration, the column 18 may be twisted forth and back slightly until the pin 17, Whose point is rounded as shown, alines the disks again. This action does not involve difficulty or loss of time as the apertures 19a are in close succession, making it easy to find them by the jogging of the pin 17.

When the pin 17 has been lowered through all the disks, the column 18 is given a quick twirl in a right-hand direction, that is, in a direction for the arm 16 to climb the spiral ring 15. The initial urge by the pin 17 sets the disks into spinning motion, and as the pin is raised by the climbing of the arm 16 on the spiral, the disks are one by one released whereby to travel free at their own speeds. By this time the arm has come to a rest on the horizontal section 15a of the spiral. As my invention is to suddenly stop the disks at whatever points they may have reached in their free travel, it is necessary to raise the column 18 whereby to have the arm 16 surmount the lug extension 15?) and bring the pin 17 over the cross head aperture 146. The column is now released, whereupon the weight thereof will cause the pin to fall through the cross head aperture and successively through the apertures in the disks below as those apertures come in line, so that soon the disks are all caught and stationed as indicated in Figure 3.

It will be apparent that the disks will now be in different lateral positions, owing to the fact that their independent travel has caused them to overrun or underrun one another. This result is made use of to determine game values for different players. Thus, in the illustration the indicia on the disks is for playing cards, and each radial division represents the five or six cards in a players hand. Obviously, when the disks stop at different lateral positions, the indicia combinations opposite the players will have changed. Clearly, the best card value wins. In a card or similar game the decision may be reached by one spining for a game; or, it may be reached by eliminating players on successive spinnings.

It will be seen that I have provided a game apparatus which is simple, easily operated and fascinating. The means employed to impart spinning motion to the disks is rigidly supported and has no spring or other delicate parts to get out of order. No mishaps can occur in the spinning of the disks by the interference of the pin 17, since the latter rises fully clear of the disks in less than a single revolution of the column. While the parts are all of metal, except for the base 10, the provision of the ball bearings and the smooth spiral makes it easy to twirl the column 18 and impart spinning motion to the disks, so that not only adults but children can operate the game. Finally, the parts employed in the construction of the novel game are of simple design and require no extreme accuracy for construction and assembly, so that the game may be produced at a reasonable figure.

I claim:

1. A game apparatus comprising a stationary base and a vertical center post, and vertically-spaced series of disks freely centered on the post, said disks being perforated in registration, a vertically movable pin insertible through the row of perforations, said pin being movable to impart joint rotary motion to the series of disks, and means to engage and raise the pin from engagement with the disks as it is moved to rotate them.

2. A game apparatus comprising a stationary base and a vertical center post, a vertically-spaced series of disks freely centered on the post, said disks being perforated in registration, a vertically movable pin insertable through the row of perforations, and a. support for raising the pin out of engagement with the perforations as it is moved to impart joint rotary motion to the series of disks.

ary base and a vertical center post, a vertically-spaced series of disks freely centered on the post, said disks being perforated in registration, a vertically movable pin insertable through the row of perforations, a re- 0. A game apparatus comprising a stationile duced rod directed upwardly from the post, a support for the pin centered about the rod, and a tubular column extended upwardly from the support and about the rod.

4. The structure of claim 3, and an enlargement at the upper portion of the rod, the bore of the column clearing the enlargement.

5. The structure of claim 8, and an enlargement at the upper portion of the rod, the support being centered so closely as to be barred by the enlargement when the support is raised to the same.

6. The structure of claim 2, and a fixed crosshead carried by the post and perforated for the downward passage of the pin before its insertion into the disk perforations.

7. The structure of claim 2, a fixed crosshead carried by the post, and a spiral cam erected on the crosshead and efiiective to raise the support during its rotation whereby to lift the pin out of the disk perforations.

8. The structure of claim 2, a fixed crosshead carried by the post, and a spiral cam erected on the crosshead and effective to raise the support during its rotation whereby to lift the pin out of the disk perforations, said cam having a notch at the high end.

9. The structure of claim 2, a fixed crosshead carried by the post, and a spiral cam erected on the crosshead and effective to raise the support during its rotation whereby to lift the pin out of the disk perforations, said cam having a notch at the high end forming an upward projection.

10. The structure of claim 2, a fixed crosshead carried by the post and perforated for the downward passage of the pin before its insertion into the disk perforations, and a ring erected on the crosshead inwardly of its perforation, said ring having its upper edge rising fro-m the level of the crosshead in advance of the perforation and with a spiral course to terminate with a fall before the perforation.

11. The structure of claim 2, a fixed crosshead carried by the post and perforated for the downward passage of the pin before its insertion into the disk perforations, and a ring erected on the crosshead inwardly of its perforation, said ring having its upper edge rising from the level of the crosshead in advance of the perforation and with a spiral course to terminate with a fall before the perforation, the upper edge of the ring being formed with a horizontal rest and a terminal upward projection preceding the fall.

12. A game apparatus comprising a stationary base and a vertical center post, a vertically spaced series of discs freely centered on the post and having registering perforations, a vertically movable pin insertable through a row of perforations and movable to impart joint rotary movement to the discs, and means-to engage the pin and raise it from

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2441074 *Dec 17, 1945May 4, 1948Kirkpatrick James EGame
US2565557 *Jul 29, 1946Aug 28, 1951Guimond Charles WSpinning disk game apparatus
US2606024 *Jun 19, 1950Aug 5, 1952Marseille Walter WRotatable disk number game device
US3709500 *Jul 26, 1971Jan 9, 1973Raymond Lee Organization IncChance operated peg element projecting device
US3941389 *May 30, 1975Mar 2, 1976Guimond Charles WSpinner game device
US5839955 *Nov 13, 1996Nov 24, 1998Mangano; BarbaraSpinning wheel game and device therefore
US6059658 *Oct 2, 1998May 9, 2000Mangano; BarbaraSpinning wheel game and device therefor
US6217022 *Jun 11, 1999Apr 17, 2001Morteza AstanehaGambling game
US6719290Feb 11, 2002Apr 13, 2004Kristina KershnerStorytelling and idea generation game
US7287755Apr 8, 2004Oct 30, 2007Kristina KershnerMethod of playing a storytelling and idea generation game
US7677571Oct 21, 2005Mar 16, 2010Adams Iii Bobbie LeeGame apparatus
US9111414 *May 2, 2014Aug 18, 2015Karma Gaming International Inc.Spinning game
US20040162133 *Feb 11, 2004Aug 19, 2004Jackson Kathleen NylundNovel display and novel video payline format
US20060038343 *Oct 21, 2005Feb 23, 2006Adams Bobbie LGame apparatus
US20120112408 *Nov 10, 2010May 10, 2012Poon Albert K CApparatus and method of playing a multiple-wheel roulette game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/142.0HA
International ClassificationA63F1/00, A63F5/04, A63F1/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63F5/043, A63F5/0076, A63F2001/027
European ClassificationA63F5/04S