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Publication numberUS1893086 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 3, 1933
Filing dateOct 10, 1930
Priority dateOct 9, 1929
Publication numberUS 1893086 A, US 1893086A, US-A-1893086, US1893086 A, US1893086A
InventorsGeorg Keller
Original AssigneeGeorg Keller
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Arrangement for consecutively addressing any number of envelopes without carbon copy by means of a typewriter
US 1893086 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 3, 1933.

LLE

. G. KE R 1,893,086 ARRANGEMENT FOR CONSECUTIVELY ADDRESSING ANY NUMBER OF WITHOUT CARBON COPY BY MEANS OF A TYPEWRITER ENVELOPES Filed 001;. 10. 1930 Patented Jan. 3, 1933 GEORG KELLER, OF BERLIN-STEGLITZ, GERMANY ARRANGEMENT FOR CONSECUTIVELY ADDRESSING ANY NUMBER OF ENVELOPES WITHOUT CARBON COPY BY MEANS OF A TYPEWRITER Application filed October 10, 1930, Serial No. 487,780, and in Germany October 9, 1929.

For dispatching letters and printed matter in most instances windowless envelopes are employed which must be addressed individually.

In the case of circularizing on a large scale the addresses are mostly copied by hand from a directory as the introduction of the envelopes into the typewriter takes too much time.

For the orderly delivery of a letter, it is however better if the address is typewritten as it is more legible than handwriting which is often careless.

By means of this invention it is possible to address by means of a typewriter any number of envelopes without carbon copy one after the other, that is without any loss of time by inserting separately each envelope to be addressed.

The invention consists in that the envelopes to be addressed are connected directly or in directly in a chain or band in such a manner, that the whole is fed into the typewriter and can be addressed consecutively without interruption.

The addressing of the envelope can be effected in this manner in the shortest imaginable time and absolutely legibly. At the same time the method makes it possible, by applying strips of gummed writing paper and carbon paper onthe envelope to be addressed, to obtain further identically worded addresses which in the event of repeated sending of postal matter to the same addresses can be cut ofl' in known manner and stuck as labels on the envelopes in question.

Two embodiments of the invention are illustrated by way of example in the accompanying drawing in which:

Fig. 1 shows a back view of one form of envelope in open condition.

Fig. 2 is a similar view to Fig. 1 showing a difl'erently shaped envelope.

Fig. 3 shows the envelopes illustrated in Fig. 1 connected together like a band or chain. c

Fig. 4 is a similar view to Fig. 3 of the envelopes shown in Fig. 2.

As shown in Figs. 1 and 2 the envelopes serving for carrying out the invention are of the usual shape and size, but differ from the ordinary envelopes in that the gummed portion a of the flap I) does not extend to the point a or to the edge 03 of the flap but only up to a line of perforations e which separates the ungummed point 0 or edge d from the gummed main portion of the flap b.

In order to produce a continuous band or chain-like unit according to Fig. 3 or 4 of envelopes to be written, the envelopes are connected together in such a manner that each envelope covers about half the next follow- 1ng envelope. The outer side of the flap point 0 or of the flap edge 03 is stuck on the inner side of the flap b (Fig. 3) or edge (Fig. 4) of the envelope lying directly thereunder.

The envelopes are therefore connected in this manner in any desired number to form a band or chain shaped unit which is fed in this form into a typewriter and can continuously be typed with addresses without any interruption, the envelope which has just been typed pulling along the chain of the envelopes still to be addressed when the typewriting machine is being shifted. i

The band or chain shaped unit therefore preferably runs off a roll f in the manner shown in Fig. 5.

After the band has been typed with addresses, the individual envelopes are easily severed along the perforations e.

If it is desired to send several dispatches to the same addresses, a suitable number of further addresses are preferably typed when addressing the envelopes, by placing a suitable number of carbon and writing paper strips on the band or chain shaped row of envelopes (Figs. 3 and 4).

The uppermost strip will then be written directly by the typewriter, the strips situated thereunder as also the chain of envelopes being inscribed by means of carbon paper. The paper strips, which are preferably gummed on the back, are then, after having been typed, cut into address labels and later on simply stuck on the envelopes to be dispatched.

The connection of the individual envelopes to form a band or chain-shaped unit may evidently be effected in any other suitable manner, for exam 1e with the aid of one or more supporting ands.

I claim:

1. An arrangement for consecutively ad- 5 dressing any number of envelopes without carbon copies by means of a typewriter, comprising a plurality of envelopes arranged partly superposed to form a band, with the outside of the opened closing fla of one 1 envelope stuck on the inner side 0 the precedin envelope.

2. n envelope for forming a band as specified in claim 1, comprising in combination with the envelope body, a closing flap 1 extending from said body gummed on the outer side at its extremity remote from said bod adapted to be stuck to the inner surface of t e preceding envelope.

3. An envelope for forming a band as specified in claim 1, comprising in combinat1on with the envelope body, a closing flap extending from said body and an end portion of said flap gummed on its outer side adapted to be stuc on the inner surface of the preceding envelope and separated from said flap by a row of perforations adapted to allow the envelope to be torn apart after the addressing.

4. An envelope for forming a band as specified in claim 1, comprising in combinat1on with the envelope body, a closing flap extending from said body gummed on its inner side along-its edges, and an end portion of said flap gummed only on its outer side adapted to be stuck to the inner surface of the preceding envelope.

In testimony whereof, I afiix my signature.

GEORG KELLER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2671602 *Sep 4, 1948Mar 9, 1954Vogt Clarence WChain of bags
US2682206 *Oct 28, 1948Jun 29, 1954Clarence W VogtApparatus for and method of chaining enwrapments
US2688435 *Mar 5, 1949Sep 7, 1954Vogt Clarence WChained enwrapment
US2715493 *Dec 23, 1948Aug 16, 1955Vogt Clarence WChained enwrapments
US2824686 *Mar 9, 1955Feb 25, 1958Hamilton William SContinuous envelope
US2986077 *Jan 24, 1958May 30, 1961Berkley Machine CoMethod and device for joining envelopes and similar articles to form a continuous band thereof
US3884412 *Apr 2, 1973May 20, 1975Price Nellie PeckClear view thread or yarn holder
US6559970Oct 23, 2000May 6, 2003Avery Dennison CorporationMachineable envelope assembly and method of accurately printing indicia on envelopes
US6789725Aug 20, 2002Sep 14, 2004Avery Dennison CorporationPrintable envelope with L-shaped addition
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/69, 462/6
International ClassificationB65D27/00, B65D27/10
Cooperative ClassificationB65D27/10
European ClassificationB65D27/10