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Publication numberUS1893729 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 10, 1933
Filing dateSep 10, 1932
Priority dateSep 10, 1932
Publication numberUS 1893729 A, US 1893729A, US-A-1893729, US1893729 A, US1893729A
InventorsCall Reginald L
Original AssigneeCharles Parker Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fixture support
US 1893729 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. L. CALL FIXTURE SUPPORT Jan. 10, 1933.

Filed sept. 1o, 1952 2 Sheets-sheet 2 Patented Jan. 1.0, 1933 UNITEDv STATES PATENT. YOlii-TICE REGINALD L. CALL, OF MERIDEN, CONNCTIUT, ASSIGNOR TO THE CHARLES PARKER COMPANY, OE MERIDEN', CONNECTICUT, A CORPORATION FIXTURE SUPPORT Application led September 10,-1932. Serial No. 632,487.

This invention relates to an improvement in fixture supports and particularly to supports employing a plate adapted to be secured to a wall or other surface and formed with an outwardly-projecting stud, over which a fixture is set and connected with the stud by a transverse screw.

The object of this invention is to form the stud, fixture and screw so that by the insertion of the screw, the fixture will be crowded against the plate and the flanges of the fixture firmly against the wall, and the invention consists in the construction as hereinafter described and particularly recited in the claims.

In the accompanying drawings:

Fig. 1 is a vertical sectional view through a fixture support constructed in accordance with my invention and showing the initial position in assembling the parts;

Fig. 2 is a similar view, with the screw entering the stud;

Fig. 3 is a similar View, showing the screw approaching its final position;

Fig. 4 is a similar view, showing the screw in its final position and the fixture seated against a wall;

Fig. 5 is a sectional view on the line 5 5 of Fig. 4; and

Fig. 6 is a sectional view on the line 6-6 of Fig. 4.

In carrying out my invention, I employ a plate 10 adapted to be secured to a wall or other structure 11 by screws 12. This plate is formed with an outwardly-extending stud 13 which has a transverse threaded opening 14, the outer end 15 of the opening being counterbored.

A fixture 16 of any approved design and for the desired purpose is formed with a flange 17 provided with a chamber 18 to set over the plate 10. This fixture is formed with a longitudinal recess 19 entering from the back and adapting the fixture to be set over the stud 13. In one side of the fixture is an opening 20 and in line with this opening in the other side is a conical recess 21. Adapted to be entered into the opening 20, and engaged with the threads 14 is a screw 22 having a truncated cone end 23 adapted to enter the conicalv recess21. The opening 20 is slightly larger in diameter than the diameter of the head 24 of the screw.

Fig. 1 shows the parts in the first position of assembly. The screw has been inserted through the hole 20 with the conical surface of its point resting against the cuter edge of the counterbored hole 15. So far no force has been applied to the screw and `there is no pressure between the flange and the wall. A slight pressure with a screw driver will now force the screw into the counterbored portion 15 and engage one edge thereof, and so tend to crowd the flange against the wall as shown in Fig. 2 of the drawings.

In this Fig. 2, the screw has not been turned by a screw driver, but the screw has been forced axially to the bottom of the counterbore where the threads are now ready to interlock upon rotation of the screw under sustained axial pressure. It will be noted that the screw is slightly canted, bearing upon the fixture at the inner side of the hole 2O and the outer side of the counterbore 15. The forces involved at this stage are due to the intentional misalignment between the hole in the fixture and the tapped and counterbored hole in the stud. At this stage a portion of the flange of the fixture is crowded against the wall at one side, while it is still free from the wall at the opposite point.

Fig. 3 shows the screw inserted with a screw driver up to the point where the conical surface 23 touches the conical recess 21 in the fixture. It will be noted here, as in Fig. 2, that the screw is still slightly canted, bearing against theV inner side of the hole 2O and against the outer side of the threads in the stud, the conical end of the screw just touching the conical recess in thelixture. The looseness of the threads has been intentionally exaggerated but the principle of location of forces is thereby more clearly illustrated. -llVere the screw to be left in this position, the sole force holding the fixture to the wall would necessarily be concentrated by the Contact of the screw with the inner side of the hole 20. Here again one side of the flange is forced against the wall, while the other is slightly free therefrom, no pres- Cil sure being exerted at the point where it is free.

F ig. 4 shows the parts in the final position in which the screw is inserted. Here the screw has been driven home and has come to final rest in the conical recess in the fixture, and the screw has assumed a position at right angles to the stud, the screw bearing against the rear wall of the opening 20 and the rear wall of the conical recess 2l, these bearings being equally divided, and in the stud uniformly distributed between the threaded portions of the screw and stud. It should be noted lthat the flattened point of the screw does not bottom in the conical recess in the fixture, but bears at the inner side thereof and against the inner side of the hole 2O so as to bring the fixture to a position at right angles to the stud and the flange in contact with the wall, throughout its entire circume ference.

The screw thus effectively bridges the fixture, seating at both sides of the stud and exerting effective force on opposite sides of the fiange instead of at one side only, and there is a well distributed bearing in the thread of the stud instead of a bearing at just one side.

It is this latter feature, coupled with the truncated cone-shaped point on the screw, that enables the device to function as itr does in distributing' the bearing' properly between the .fixture and the stud.

I claim:

l. In a fixture support, comprising a plate and a stud, the stud formed with a transverse opening counter-bored and threaded, a fixture formed with a longitudinal opening from its inner end for the. reception of said stud, said fixture formed on one side with a clearance opening and on the other side with a conical notch, the apex of which is at one side of the longitudinal center of the stud opening, and a screw having a truncated conica-l end adapted to pass through the opening in the fixture, engage with the threads in the stud, and enter the conical recess, whereby the fixture is forced onto the stud and firmly engaged therewith.

2, In a fixture support, comprising a plate and a stud, the stud formed with a transverse opening' counterbored and threaded, a fix ture formed with a longitudinal opening from its inner end for the reception of said stud, said fixture formed on one side with a clearance opening and on theother side with a conical notch, the apex of which is at one side of the lon gitudin al center of the stud opening, and a screw slightly less in diameter than the diameter of the opening in the fixture and the diameter of the threaded opening in the stud, said screw having a truncated conical end adapted to pass through the opening in the fixture, engage with the specification.

REGINALD L. CALL.

RID

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2876971 *Mar 30, 1955Mar 10, 1959Illinois Tool WorksMeans for securing ceiling panels in automobiles
US2879722 *Mar 9, 1956Mar 31, 1959Evans Prod CoCross bar
US3260021 *Sep 27, 1962Jul 12, 1966Katz Jacob MMeans for mounting fixtures and appliances onto plaster or tile walls
US4113213 *Mar 10, 1977Sep 12, 1978Gay Guy RMail box support
US4907771 *Mar 1, 1989Mar 13, 1990Wang Wen MuHanger with improved positioning structure
US4981276 *Aug 11, 1989Jan 1, 1991Alexander AgorSupport for towels and the like
US5026012 *Mar 6, 1990Jun 25, 1991Wang Wen MuTowel support
US5398899 *Feb 3, 1993Mar 21, 1995A-Dec, Inc.Rotation adjustment for dental instrument holder
US6334597 *Jun 9, 2000Jan 1, 2002Lai Ming-HsiaoHanger holder for use in bathroom
US6651830 *Dec 10, 2001Nov 25, 2003Sheng Tai Brassware Co., Ltd.Towel rack
US7503534 *Feb 6, 2006Mar 17, 2009Pollack Robert WUniversal bathroom accessory system
US7926772Mar 26, 2008Apr 19, 2011Hardware Resources, Inc.Bathroom fixture attachment device including a rotary coupling
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/222.14, 248/251
International ClassificationA47B57/46, A47B57/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47B57/46
European ClassificationA47B57/46