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Publication numberUS1893828 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 10, 1933
Filing dateDec 1, 1928
Priority dateDec 1, 1928
Publication numberUS 1893828 A, US 1893828A, US-A-1893828, US1893828 A, US1893828A
InventorsGraeme Charles G
Original AssigneeJohn H Wells
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Machine for separating and counting coins
US 1893828 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 10, 1933. c, GRAEME 1,893,828

MACHINE FOR SEPARATING AND' COUNTING COINS Filed Dec. 1, 1928 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 wwww ATTORNEY Jan. 10, c, G, GR E 1,893,828

MACHINE FOR SEPARATING AND COUNTING COINS Filed Dec. 1, 1928 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 5/101 661m 36 46 42 H w MEY fl Z AT-TORN Jan. 10, 1933. c. G. GRAEME 1,893,328

MACHINE FOR SEPARATING AND COUNTING CQINS Filed Dec. 1. 1928 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Jan. 10, 1933. g; RA ME 1,893,828

MACHINE FOR SEPARATING AND COUNTING COINS Filed Dec. 1, 1928 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 90 l x i 5 {i l 107 97 A l i H Patented Jan. 10, 1933 n TEo STATES PATENT OFFEE CHARLES G. GBAEME, OF BUFFALO, NEXV YORK, ASSIGNOR '20 JOHN H. WELLS i MACHINE FOR SEPARATING AND COUNTING COINS Application filed December This invention relates to machines for separating and counting coins of various denominations, that is whereby a plurality of coins of various denominations and sizes may be 5 separated and the number of each denomination counted.

Among the objects of the present invention, it is aimed to provide an improved machine for simultaneously separating and counting the several denominations of a plurality of coins of different denominations. To this end, the present invention further provides means which cooperate with one another not only to separate the coins of like denomination but also cooperate to actuate counters for counting the number of coins of like denominations so separated.

Among the objects of the present invention, it is also aimed to provide an improved means whereby a plurality of streams of coins of like denomination may be separated and the coins of each individual stream counted.

These and other features, capabilities and advantages of the presentinvention will appear from the subjoined detail description of one embodiment thereof illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which Figure 1 is a side elevation of the complete machine for separating and counting coins;

Fig. 2 is a perspective of the main part of the machine for separating and counting coins;

Fig. 3 is a plan of the several cooperating devices, partly broken away;

Fig. 4 is a section on the line 4-4 of Fig. 8

Fig. 5 is a fragmental plan of part of the cooperating devices;

Fig. 6 is a plan of the face of the frame upon which and with which the several operating devices rotate;

Fig. 7 is a section on the line 77 of Fig. 6;

Fig. 8 is a section on the line 8-8 of Fig. 6.

In the embodiment illustrated there is provided a main frame A having a supporting foot member 1 preferably provided with suitable cushioned plugs 2, to engage a supporting surface such as a table, desk, or the like. From the foot member 1 there extends up- 50 wardly a standard 3 at the upper end of rating and counting the coins. As shown in Serial No. 323,115.

which there is provided an enlargement 4 having secured at its upper end a disk 5.

On the disk 5, several devices hereinafter to be described, are mounted to cooperate with one another and to separate the coins of several denominations into a plurality of streams, each stream containing the coins of like denomination. From the disk the streams of coins are guided through the housing member 6 to the several containers 7, 8, 9,10 and 11 supported on the bracket or apron member 12 extending from the foot member 1, see particularly Fig. 1. The apron 12 is provided with a plurality of jaw members 13, one for each container 7, 8, 9, and 11, by means of which jaw members 18, money bags or the like may be suitably attached to the bottom of the apron 13 to receive the coins directfrom the guiding member 6 or from the containers 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 as desired. The main part of the present invention consistsin the means for separating and counting the coins before the coins are passed to the guiding member 6.

The parts of the machine constituting the means for separating and counting the coins Wlll now be described in detail.

The enlargement 4: forms a housing for the driving connections of the means for sepa- Fig. 4, a shaft 14 extends from the side of the housing 4 and has secured thereon a pulley 15 which is connected by a suitable belt 16 with a pulley not shown, but preferably driven or associated with an electric motor which may be attached to the supporting plates 17 and 18 formed on the rear face of the standard 3, see Fig. 1. The shaft 14, see Fig. 3, has formed thereon a worm 19 which meshes with a worm wheel 20, which worm wheel is fixedly connected to the sleeve 21 of the bushing 22 having a disk like portion 28 at its upper end resting in the bottom of the enlarged recess 24 of the central housing portion 25 of the disk member 5.

The bushing 22 is preferably anchored to the central enlargement 26 of a rotatable disk member having a plurality of fingers 27 extendingradially from the annulus 28 of such disk member.

For anchoring the bushing 22 to the enlargement 26 so that the enlargement 26 can be readily disconnected from the bushing 22 and made inoperative in case of a jam, there is provided an enlarged opening 29 in the enlargement 26 to receive a compression spring 30 which abuts against the shoulder portion 31 at its .upper end, and against the washer 32 at its lower end. The washer 32 is adapted to engage the up )er surface of a key 33 which when locking the bushing 22 to the enlargement 26 rests partly in the keyway 34 in the enlargement 26 and partly in the key-way of the bushing 22. The keyway 35 of the bushing 22 communicates with the central opening 36 which extends axially throughout the entire length of the bushing 22 to receive the pin 37 which cooperates with the peripheral face of the cam 38 formed on the shaft 39. The shaft 39, as illustrated in Fig. 4, is pivotally mounted at its left hand end in the enlargement 40 of the housing 4, and at its right hand end in the enlargement 41 of the housing 4. To anchor the shaft against axial displacement, a sleeve 42 is secured thereto and positioned between the cam 38 and the enlargement 41. The right hand outer end of the shaft 39 has secured thereto the collar 42 which collar has an extension 43 to which is pivotally connected to push rod 44, which push rod extends through the guiding member 6 and has formed at its front free end a handle member 45. The action of this push rod 44 and cam 38 is such that the high spot 46 of the cam 38 will be pushed into engagement with the lower end of the pin 37 by the push rod 44 when it is desired to disconnect the enlargement 26 from cooperation with the bushing 22, at which time the pin 87 will raise the key 33 out of the key-way 35 of the bushing 22 against the compression of the spring 30, in which position the bushing 22 will be free to rotate without driving the enlargement 26 with it. After the jam has been corrected, the push rod 44 may, of course, be again pulled out to permit the high spot of the cam 38 to clear the lower end of the pin 37 and thus permit the spring 30 again to press the key 33 into the keyway 35.

The main elements for cooperating with one another to effect the separating of the coins and to initiate the actuation of the counters consists essentially of four superimposed devices of which the disk 5 forms the lowermost and is stationary, the fingers 27 and the annulus 28 form the second uppermost device and is rotatable. Above the fingers 27 there is formed an annular ring portion which forms the third uppermost device which is fixed to the disk 5 and therefore stationary, and above the ring 47 and in engagement with the same there is formed the ring portion 48, the inner end of which is secured in the recess 49 of the annulus 28 and forms the fourth uppermost device. Generally speaking, the lowermost disk 5 contains pockets for receiving the coins after they have been separated. The fingers 27 during rotation engage such coins after they have been received in the pockets of the disk 5 to advance them and therewith to actuate the counters hereinafter to be described.

The third uppermost device or rin 47 is provided wtih a graduated slot the edges of which form a platform for the coins not selected, the graduated slot of such ring 47 cooperating with a plurality of receses formed in the ring 48, the coins being engaged by the edges of the recesses formed in the ring 48 and advanced to, and along, the slot formed in the ring 47 until the coins arrive at the desired opening for receiving the same.

In the present instance, the disk 5, as more clearly illustrated in Fig. 6, has an outer annular rim member 50 having two stepped inner recesses 51 and 52 respectively, the lower face of the recess 51 being disposed in a plane below the upper surface of the central housing portion 25 to form a clearance for the outer ends of the fingers 27 of the central enlargement 26. The lower face of the recess 52 alines substantially with the lower face of the recess 53 formed in the enlargement i:

26, the ring 47 being secured to the disk 5 in the recess 52 and the inner periphery of the ring 47 registering with the recess 53, such recess 53 forming a clearance for the inner edge of the ring 47 to permit the housing 26 and annulus 28 to rotate relative to the ring 47.

The inner edge of the ring 48 is received by the recess 49 and is there secured to the annulus 28 of the housing portion 26 so that the ring 48 will rotate with the housing 26.

To the annular portion 50 outside of the recess 52, there is secured the hopper 54 having an enlarged lower retaining wall 55 graduating into the upper diminished retaining wall 56.

As shown in Fig. 1, the face of the disk member 5 together with the plane of travel of the fingers 27 and the plane of the rings 47 and 48 alined with one another form an angle substantially of forty-five degrees with a horizontal plane so that the enlarged lower retaining wall 55 of the hopper 54 with the diminished retaining wall 56 together form substantially the outer wall of a truncated cone with the enlarged retaining wall portion 55 at the bottom of the hopper 54 and the remaining portion of the hopper graduating upwardly into the diminished retaining wall portion 56 of the hopper 54 disposed along the upper edges of the rings 47 and 48.

The upper face of the annulus 28 and the upper face of the ring 48 form the floor of the hopper 54. The imaginary plane through which these upper faces of the annulus 28 and ring 48 travel, for the purpose of thedescrlption, may be divided. into four quadrants, the lower right hand quadrant A, the lower left hand quadrant B, the upper left hand quadrant C, and the upper right hand quadrant D. In the operation of the machine, the coins to be separated and counted are poured into the hopper 54 preferably resting above the lower quadrants A and B, and during the rotation of the fingers 27 and ring member 48, the coins will be moved upwardly in a clockwise direction so that the coins selected will first be passed into the quadrant C where they are finally separated, and then passed into the quadrant D where the coins are counted. For the purpose of initially selecting the coins to be separated and counted, the ring 48, as shown in Fig. 2, is provided with a plurality of arcuate recesses 57 which are slightly larger in diameter than the diameter of a fifty cent piece when the machine is intended for use with the coinage of the United States of America. The machine illustrated is constructed, in the present instance, for use with the coinage of the United States of America, and consequently when reference is made to the ten cent piece, the one cent piece, the five cent piece, the twentyfive cent piece and the fifty cent piece, it will be understood that reference is had to the coinage of the United States of America.

The rccesse' 57, as more clearly shown in Fig. 3, extend inwardly from the periphery of the ring 48, so that the periphery of the ring 48 is provided with a plurality of interruptions defined by these arcuate recesses 57. It is preferable that the thickness of the ring 48 be substantially the thickness of a new fifty cent piece. This thickness is less than the combined thickness of two ten cent pieces. Advantage is taken of this relation between the fifty cent piece and the ten cent piece. As an instance, if the recess 57 in its clockwise movement should take up two ten cent pieces, one placed on top of the other, the same might be carried along by the ring 48 until it passed the quadrant B and entered the quadrant C when the upper ten cent piece would first come into engagement with the shearing rotor 58, and being obstructed by such rotor 58 from further progress, would besheared off or dislodged from the lower ten cent piece, and permit the lower ten cent piece in the recess 57 alone to be advanced through the quadrant C. The rear edge of the recess 57, with respect to the rotation of the ring 48, as particularly illustrated in Fig. 3, is inclined at 59 to facilitate the ready removal or dislodgement of a second coin as aforesaid. The shearing rotor 58, in the present instance, consists of a disk ha ing an upwardly and inwardly tapering edge 60, and is rotatably mounted on the arm 61 which is pivotally mounted at 2 to the outer annular por ion 50 of the disk 5. Such arm rants A, B and C.

61 is preferably provided with a spring 63 causing the arm to be tensed radially inwardly with the edge of the arm 61 engaging the edge of the hopper 54, the hopper 54 being provided with a recess to permit the rotor 58 to extend through the retaining wall of the hopper into the path of movement of any coins which might be lod ed on the upper face of the ring 48, or upon the upper face of another coin located in a recess or pocket 57 and resting on the upper face of the ring 47. It is apparent, of course, from the foregoing that the ring 47 forms the supporting surface for the coins lodged in the recesses 57 when passing through the quad- Should a second coin still remain lodged upon a coin located in a re cess 57 after the ring 48 passes the shearing rotor 58, it will then be advanced to the second shearing device which consists of the blade 64 which is pivoted at 65 to the annulus 50 of the disk 5 in the quadrant D, and extends back into the quadrant C with its inclined shearing edge 66 extending completely across the path of movement of any second coin lodged upon an initially selected coin in re "s 57. This blade 64 has connected to its outer ec 67 at the outer end of its shearing edge 66 a bracket 68 which is pivotally co nected to the rod 69. The rod 69 extends through the guideway 70 which forms an abutment for the compression spring 71 which is tensed between the abutment 70 and the nut 72 formed at the end of the rod 69, such spring 71 causing said shearing blade (34 to extend inwardly across the upper face of the ring 48, with the bracket 68 engaging the outer periphery of the annulus 50. The yieldability of the shearing blade 64 due to the spring 71, and the yieldability of the rotor 58 due to the spring 68, will, of course, serve to protect the machine from injury in case of a jam, such shearing members yielding in case of a jam. On the other hand, as soon as the operator notices such a jam, he can quickly stop the machine by pushing in the push rod 44 to disconnect the driving means from the fingers 27 and ring 48, and thereupon by drawing out either the shearing member 58 or 64, whichever is engaged to its denomination and conveyed to the counting mechanism. This final separating or sorting and counting will take place in quadrant D, and will now be described.

The dash and dot line in F? 5 is intended to indicate the lower edge or path of n1o ment of the inner edges of the recesses 57 to the plate 48. The plate 48 is not shown in Fig. 5. hen the coins are advanced on the ring 47 which is stationary, they are so advanced by the plate 48, see Fig. 3, and when so advancedythe dash and dot line, being spaced from the lower edge 74 of the recess 75, the ledge so formed between the edge 74 of the plate 47 and the inner edges of the recesses 57 of the plate 48 will support the lower ends of the coins, as indicated in Fig. 5.

Vith regard to keeping the coins against the lower edges of the recesses 57 of the plate 48, see F ig. 1, the coins will move upwardly in a clockwise direction and at first be raised on a lateral edge of the recesses 57 and then swing over to the inner edges of the recesses 57 when the coin is moved to the top oi the head 5 shown in Fig. 1, where, due to gravity, the coins will rest on the lower edges of the recesses 57. Centrifugal force or friction of the coin on plate 47 will not cause the coins to leave the desired position and drop into the wrong chute, since the mach'ne is rarely rotated at more than twenty-live revolutions to the minute, when, there is not suflicient centrifugal force to move the coins out of position and the inclination of the head 5 is such that the weight of the coins will be suiiic'ent to drop them into tieir proper position. Then, too, the cam shoe 64, see the top of Fig. 3, which cooperaies with the coin to press it toward the inner edge of the recess 57, positively overco nes any iric tional adhesion between the coin and the plate 47.

The ring 47, see particularly Fig. 5, is provided with an extended slot 73 which starts in quadrant C before arriving at quadrant D and extends down about two-thirds of the arcuate length of quadrant D. This slot 73 has a lower edge 74 concentric with the path of movement of the ring 48 and formed in an are slightly larger than the are described by the inner edges of the recesses 57 of the ring 48. The are of the ring 74 has a radius sul stantially one-eighth of an inch greater than the radius oi the are of the path of movement of the inner edges of the recesses by means of which relation the ring 47 adjacent to the arcuate edge of the recess 73 will form a coin supporting ledge 75 for the coins advanced by the ring 48 to their des'red location. The outer edge of the recess 73 con sists of a plurality of notches 76, 77, 78, 79 and 80, of gradually increasing width, the notch 76 being the smallest and the notch 80 being the largest. These several notches 76 to 80 inclusive correspond to the dimensions of the five coins in greatest use, to wit, the coins of the denominations, ten cent, one cent, five cent, twenty-five cent and fifty cent. The dimensions of these several notches are such that when a ten cent piece is carried by a recess 57 and it passes to the notch 76, the inner edge of the ten cent piece will be supported by the ledge 75 but the outer edge thereof will just clear the outer edge of the notch 76 and tilt downwardly in front of a finger 27. All of the remaining coins of greater diameter will be supported by the ledge 75 and the ring 47 beyond the edge of the notch 76 and pass on to the next succeeding notch 77. If the coin lodged in the recess 57 is a one cent piece, when it is advanced to the notch 77 its inner edge will still be supported by the ledge 75 and its outer edge will just clear the outer edge of the notch 77 and tilt down into the path of movement of a finger 27. Similarly, all of the coins of still greater diameter will be advanced beyond such notch 77 being supported by the ledge 75 and the portion of the ring 47 adjacent to the outer edge of the notch 7 7. In the same way, the five cent pieces will be tilted into the space formed by the notch 78, the twenty-five cent pieces will be tilted into the space formed by the notch 79, and the fifty cent pieces will be tilted into the space torn'ied by the notch 80. To protect the recess 73 from the wrongful entry of coins not advanced thereto in the regular way by the recesses 57, a guard 81, see particularly Fig. 2, is provided. Such guard is preferably arcuate in shape and extends from the upper surface of the shearing blade 64 n a clockwise direction down to and beyond the end of the notch 80. Such guard, in the present instance, is pivotally connected at 82 to the annulus 50 and is secured in place at its upper end by the screw 83 passing through the recess 84 of the guard 81 and extending into the annulus 50, and also additionally secured in place by the screw member 85 extend ng through the projection 86 of the hopper 54 and engaging the upper surface of the guard 81. The guard 81, as illustrated in Figs. 2 and 3, is provided with an arcuate row of circular recesses 87 throughout its entire length whereby the action of the coins being separated may be observed. Such recesses 87 are slightly smaller in diameter than a ten cent piece, so that the several coins intended for use with the machine illustrated cannot pass through such recesses into the elongated recess 73 beneath the guard 81.

As illustrated in Fig. 3, it will be noted that the fingers 27 each register with an arm 88 forming the partition between successive recesses 57 in the ring 48, or the openings between the arms 27 each register with a recess 57 in the ring 48, and since such arms 27 extending from the annulus 28 are fixed to rotate with the ring 48, the openings 89 between the arms 27 will at all times register with the recesses 57 in the ring 48 during the rotation of the ring 48 and arms 27.

The ring 48 is positioned on the disk 5 so that its recess 73 registers with the several with the counting mechanism hereinafter to mouths 90', 91, 92, 93 and 94 of the slots 90, 91, 92, 93 and 94 respectively formed in the disk 5. The mouth 90 of the slot 90, as shown in Fig. 6, starts in the quadrant C but extends over into the quadrant D where the slot 90 continues on down to a portion of the quadrant A. It will be noted that as the slots 90 to 94 inclusive approach the quadrant A, they extend into paths that are parallel with one another, and after they enter the quadrant A they actually are parallel to one another and closely adjacent to one another and terminate in a common line, the line The cross section of the disk 5 is enlarged where the slots 90 to 94 extend through it as compared to the remainder of the disk, and is graduated, the cross section of the disk in line with the slot 90 being slightly less than the diameter of a ten cent piece, the cross section of the disk 5 in line with the slot 91 being slightly less than the diameter of a one cent piece, and so on, the cross section of the disk 5 in line with the slot 92 being slightly less than the diameter of a live cent piece, the cross section of the disk 5 in line with the slot 93 being slightly less than the diameter of a twenty-five cent piece, and the cross section of the disk 5 in line with the slot 94 being slightly less than the diameter of a fifty cent piece. The purpose of this cross sectional dimension of the disk 5 relative to the diameter of the several coins mentioned .protrude into the path of movement of the arms 27 which will. engage the rear upper edges of the coins located in such slots and actuate the same down through the quadrant A. where the coins engaged will cooperate be described. H

To support the coins in such slots 90 to 94 inclusive so that they will protrude into the path of movement of the arms 27, there is provided a platform 96 pivotally mounted on the hub 9650f the housing 4, see Fig.- 4..

. the platform 96 down about the hub 96.

For anchoringthe platform in coin supporting position, the platform 96 is provided with a finger 102 which cooperates with a cam 103 at the end of the lever 104 pivotally mounted on the link 105 at 106. Such link 105 is pivotally connected at its upper end to the enlarged portion 107 of the'disk 5, see Fig. 8. When it isdesired to release the platform 96, as clearly appears from Fig. 8, the lever 104 is swung downwardly so thatv its cam 103 clears the finger 102 and permits the lever 104 and the link 105 to be swung out of the way of the finger 102, whereupon the platform 96 can be pressed downwardly about the hub 96. The platform 96, as shown in Flg. 7, terminates in the quadrant D to clear the star wheels 108, 109, 110, 111 and 112. The star wheel 108, which registers with the slot 90, is fixed to the shaft 113 which is journaled at its inner end in the hub 96 and at its outer end in the ournal 114, see Fig. 2. Adj acent to the journal 114 there is fixed on the shaft 113 a small pinion 115 which is adapted to be operatively connected to a counter not shown, whereby as the star wheel 108 is actuated one step or one notch at a time, it will in turn actuate the pinion 115 to actuate the counter connected to such pinion 115. Each of the remaining star wheels 109 to 112 inclusive register with the notches 91 to 94 inclusive respectively. The star wheel 109 is loosely mounted on the shaft 113 and has.

connected thereto a sleeve 116 through which the shaft 113 extends, and at the end of such sleeve 116 there is fixed a pinion 117 operatively connected to a second counter for recording the one cent pieces which are caused to pass and actuate the star wheel 109. The star wheel 110 is mounted on the sleeve 116 and is provided with a sleeve 118 through which the sleeve 116 extends, which sleeve 118 has secured at its end adjacent to the pinion 117 a pinion 119 operatively connected by means of the pinion 119 to a third counter which records the five cent pieces which pass from the slot 92 and cause the star wheel 110 to be actuated.

Similarly the star wheel 111 is mounted on the sleeve 118 and is provided with a sleeve 120 through which the sleeve 118 extends and which is provided at its end with a pinion 121 adjacent to the pinion 119. The pinion 119 is operatively connected by means of the pinion 122 to actuate counterfor recording the twenty-five cent pieces which pass through the slot 98 and are caused to actuate thestar wheel 111. Similarly the star wheel 112 is mounted on. the sleeve 120 and has secured thereto a sleeve 123 through which the sleeve 120 passes, which sleeve 120 has secured at its end a pinion 124 adjacent to the pinion 121 which pinion 124 meshes with the pinion 125 which is operatively connected to a counter for recording the fifty cent pieces which pass through the slot 94 and are caused to actuate the star wheel 112. Each of the star wheels 108 to 112 inclusive is provided with ten teeth 126, see Fig. 7, operable in a counter clockwise direction, that is, in the direction indicated by the arrow 127. Each of the teeth 126 has one face 128 forming a sharper angle than its face 129 formed with the radius extending from the tip 130 of the tooth 126. The face 128 may be considered the active face in the present instance.

tooth 126, to wit, the tooth 126.

IVhen a coin is received in any one of the slots 90 to 9% inclusive, such coin is caused to cooperate with one of the faces 128 of a star wheel by means of an arm 27 which is urg ing it forward along its slot. Assume for instance, as illustrated in Fig. '7, that the coin is a fifty cent coin, to wit, the coin 131 which is passing through the slot 94-. The upper edge of the coin 131, while passing through the slot 9%, extends into the path of move ment of an arm 27 which being actuated in the direction of the arrows 132, advances the coin into engagement with a protruding IXS the arms 27 continue to advance, they will cause the coin 131 to cooperate with such tooth 126 to cause the star wheel 112 to be advanced the space of one tooth. To anchor the star wvheels against advancing more than the space of one tooth at a time, a yieldable fin- 'er 133 is provided for each tooth, see Fig. 7 l uch finger 27 is pivotally mounted at 134; at the end of the arm 135, the linger 133 having an arm 136 extending to the other side of the fulcrum 134; to which is connected a spring 137 to cause the finger 133 yieldably to press the associated star wneel at a point substantially diametrically opposed to the point of engagement by the coin.

After the coins are so caused to actuate a star wheel and to pass the star wheel so actuated, they will be free to drop into a chute, one being provided for each denomination of coins. In Fig. 7, the chute 138 is illustrated for the fifty cent pieces, the month 139 of which is illustrated in Fig. 2, and registers with the container 11. Similarly, chutes are provided extending through the guideway 6 from each slot 90 to 93 inclusive respectively,

the chute extending from the slot 90 terminating in the month 140 registering with the container 7, the chute extending from the slot 91 terminating in the mouth 141 registering 'with the container 8, the chute extending from the slot 92 terminating in the mouth 142 registering with the container 9, and the chute extending from the siot 93 terminating in the mouth 143 registering with the container 10.

It is obvious that various changes and modifications may be made to the details of construction without departing from the spirit of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In a machine of the class described, the combination with a rotatable member initially to select the coins to be separated, a stationary ring adjacent to said rotatable memher and having a recess cooperating with said rotatable member to cause the coins separated to be tilted downwardly, a plurality of rotatable arms adjacentto said ring and separated from said rotatable member bv said ring to engage the coins tilted downwardly, a

guide having a plurality of slots for receiving the coins tilted, means for supporting the coins received in said slots with their upper edges disposed in the path of movement of said rotatable arms, coin counting mechanism disposed at the end of said supporting means to receive and support the coins re-. ceived from said supporting means with the upper edges in the path of movement of said rotatable arms, said rotatable arms engaging the upper edges of such coins so disposed on said supporting means and on said counting mechanism to advance the coins and cause the same to actuate said counting mechanism.

2. In a machine of the class described, the combination with a rotatable ring having a plurality of pockets disposed adjacent its periphery initially to select the coins to be separated, of a support for supporting the coins parallel to said ring and having asuecession of graduated recesses corresponding to the several denominations of the coins to be separated and cooperating with said pockets to cause the coins selected to be tilted substantially at right angles to the path of movement of said ring, a guide having a plurality of slots corresponding to said recesses for receiving the coins tilted, a series of counters cooperating with said slots, and a plurality of actuators rotatable with said ring and associated with said ring for engaging the coins received in said slots to be rolled into engagement with said counters and to actuate said counters.

3. In a machine of the class described, the combination with a coin selector, of means for actuating said coin selector, a plate having a lurality of recesses corresponding to the denominations of the coins to be separated and cooperating with said coin selector to cause the coins selected to be tilted at an angle to said selector into the recesses corresponding to their denominations, a guide having a plurality of slots corresponding to the denominations of the coins to be selected and registering with corresponding recesses, a plurality of counters associated with said slots, and means rotatable with said selector to engage and roll the coins received in said slots into engagement with said counters and actuate said counters.

4. In a machine of the class described, the combination with a coin selector, of means for actuating said selector, a plate having a recess cooperating with said selector to cause the coins selected to be tilted to incline at an angle of about ninety degrees to said selector, a guide having a plurality of pockets registering with said recess to receive the coins selected and support them at an angle of about ninety degrees to the path of movement of said selector, a plurality of counters associated with said pockets, and actuating means rotatable with said selector for engaging the upper edges of the coins disposed in said pockets to advance the same and cause the same to actuate said counters.

5. In a machine of the class described, th combination with a coin selector, of means for actuating said coin selector, a guide having a plurality of slots corresponding to the denominations of the coins to be separated, a plate having a row of graduated recesses corresponding to the denominations of the coins to be separated, one recess for each slot, and cooperating with said selector to cause the coins selected to be tilted into said slots according to their denominations, a counter associated with each slot, and means rotatable with said selector for engaging the edges of the coins located in said slots to roll the same into engagement with said counters and actuate said counters.

6. In a machine of the class described, the combination with a coin selector, of coin advancing means operatively associated with said selector, a guide having a plurality of slots for receiving the coins according to their denominations, a plate having a recess coopcrating with said selector for causing the coins selected to tilt downwardly into said slots with the upper rear edges disposed in the path of movement of said advancing means, and a counter for each slot, said advancing means causing the coins located in said slots to be rolled into engagement with said counters to actuate the same.

7 In a machine of the class described, the combination with a rotatable coin selector, of a plurality of actuating arms fixed to rotate with said selector, a guide havin a plurality of slots for receiving the coins according to their denominations, a plate having a recess cooperating with said selector to tilt the coins selected into said slots with the upper rear edges of the coins disposed in the path of movement said arms, and a counter for each slot, said arms causing said coins to be advanced edge foremost along said slots into engagement with said counters to actuate said counters.

8. in a machine of the class described, the combination with a rotatable coin selector, of a plurality of actuating arms rotatable with said selector, a guide having a plurality of coin runways disposed alongside of one another to support the coins separated on their edges with the upper ends thereoi in the path of movement of said actuating arms, aplatc having a row of graduated recesses corrc sponding in size to the different denominations of the coins to be separated, one recess. for each runway to receive the coin separated and afiord access to its corresponding runway, and counters, one counter at the end of each runway, the actuating a1 as engaging the upper ends of the coins deposited in the runways and advancing them to engage and actuate said counters. V

9. In machine of the class described, the

combination with a stationary support having a succession of graduated recesses corresponding to the denominations of the coins to be separated, a coin carrier rotatably mounted on said support to select coins and carry the coins so selected to said recesses to permit corresponding coins to drop into corresponding recesses by gravity, a rotatable actuator, a guide having a plurality of coin runways for supporting the coins sep arated in the path of movement of said actuator, and coin counters at the ends oi said runways, said actuator advancing the coins along said runways to engage and actuate said counters.

10. In a machine of the class described, the combination with a stationary support having a succession of graduated recesses corresponding to the denominations of the coins to be separated, a coin carrier rotatably mounted on said support to carry the coins selected to said recesses, a rotatable actuator, a guide having a plurality of coin runways for supporting the coins separated in the path of movement of said actuator, and coin counters at the ends of saidrunways, said actuator advancing the coins along said runways to engage and actuate said counters, said runways extending alongside of the path of movement of said actuators for a distance less than a semi-circle.

11. In a machine of the class described, the combination with a stationary support having anopening provided with an inner arcuate edge and an outer row of recesses of successively larger dimensions, of an actuator, a coin conveyor rotatable on said support and having an annular row of pockets to receive the coins selected and advance them to said opening, the inner edges of the pockets being disposed in an are having a smaller radius than the radius of the inner arcuate edge of said opening so that the coins will tilt radially outward, a plurality of runways having mouths in alinement with said recesses to receive the coins separated and support them with their edges in the path of movement of said actuator, and coin counters at the ends of said runways, said actuator engaging the edges of the coins and rolling them along said runways t engage and actuate said counters.

12. In a machine of the class described, the combination with a coin separator, of an actuator, a guide having a plurality of runways to support the coins separated with their edges in the path of movement of said actuator, and coin counters at the ends of said runways, said actuator being common to all of said runways and engaging the outer edges of said coins and rolling them along said runways to engage and actuate said counters.

13. In a machine of the class described, the combination with a coin separator, of an actuator, a guide having a plurality of runways to support the coins separated With their edges in the path of movement of said actuator and coin counters at the ends of said runways, said actuator being common to all of said runways and engaging the outer edges of said coins and rolling them along said runways to engage and actuate said counters, said runways extending alongside of the path of movement of said actuators for a distance less than a semi-circle.

CHARLES G. GRAEME.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2680516 *Feb 11, 1953Jun 8, 1954Schuitema AlbertApparatus for separating and, if desired, sorting flat circular objects
US2848158 *Mar 21, 1951Aug 19, 1958 Power driven fare collecting and registering apparatus
US2886045 *Feb 16, 1954May 12, 1959Abbott Coin Counter Company InCoin sorting and counting machine
US3682353 *Oct 15, 1970Aug 8, 1972Lilly Industries LtdApparatus for delivering tablets and the like
US4102110 *Aug 30, 1977Jul 25, 1978Glory Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaCoin packaging system
US4304247 *Mar 12, 1980Dec 8, 1981Billcon Corporation Of AmericaDifferential speed coin sorter
Classifications
U.S. Classification453/8, 453/34
International ClassificationG07D3/00, G07D3/06
Cooperative ClassificationG07D3/06
European ClassificationG07D3/06