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Publication numberUS1893838 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 10, 1933
Filing dateJul 25, 1930
Priority dateJul 25, 1930
Publication numberUS 1893838 A, US 1893838A, US-A-1893838, US1893838 A, US1893838A
InventorsHecox Emory Daugherty
Original AssigneeHecox Emory Daugherty
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for producing musical tones and sounds
US 1893838 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 10, 1933. HECQX 31 393 333 APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING MUSICAL TONES AND SOUNDS Filed July 25, 1950 2 Sheets-$heet l Jan. 10, 1933. D. HECOX 1,893,838

APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING MUSICAL TONES AND SOUNDS Filed July 25. 1930 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 l I mm Patented Jan. 10, 1933 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE EMORY DAUGHERTY rrncox, or COLUMBUS, OHIO APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING MUSICAL TONES AND SOUNDS Application filed July 25, 1930. Serial No. 470,663.

My invention relates to improvements in V nations of tones may be provided for the difmusic and sound producing instruments in fcrent tones when they are to be sung or which the sound waves caused by singing or played in the dilferent musical keys. playing are utilized to provide a musical or Several forms of the invention are illus- H sound accompaniment for the singing or playtrated in the accompanying drawings. Figing. My invention also discloses a relatively ures 1,2 and 3 are diagrammatic views of simple musical system whereby automatic three different embodiments of my invention, harmonious musical accompaniment is possi- (Figure 1 being partly in perspective). 1 Figure 4 is a diagrammatic View of the The object of this invention is to provide switching means and connections necessary a system and instrument, whereby an operafor singing or playing in one key and within tor,-sin'ging a song, playing on a musical 1none octave. Figure 5 1s a d agrammatic view strument, or makingsounds, may provide his ofthe metronome switching device which own musical or sound accompaniment, based may be used in connection with the system on the tones sung or played, or the sounds and instrument. made. Such a system and instrument will In Figure 1, A is a microphone; X is a eliminate the necessity of having an accombattery or other source of current; B is a panist for an artist. For the novice, will protransformer with 1 and 2 the primary and vide a means of giving a complete musical secondary respectlvel C is a selector device rendition when he only has the ability to play of 311C110 frequencies, 3 the electro-magnet a ingle note, for instance on the piano. adjacent to WlllCh are steel reeds 4, 5, 6, 7 A brief description of the device will furand 8 of varying natural audio frequencies; ther show its objects and possibilities, follow- 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13 are contacts normally ing'which I will explain several forms of the l se to assoclated contacts on reeds 4, 5, 6, invention in connection with the accompany- 7 and 8 but not making contact therewith ing drawings. when the reeds are at rest; D is a lockin A simple arrangement of my patent would relay to be actuated by reed 5 and contact 10. be a microphone with a source of current, a The device requires one of these locking remodulation transformer, an electro-magnet lays for each of the reeds but for th sak in the magnetic field of which are a number f Simplicity I am only showing one. 15 is of reeds or tuning forks having varying natthe locking relay electromagnct; 14 is a conural frequencies. When a tone is sounded a n rma ly making Contact i n flS into the micro hone, all the reeds or tuning l ted contact on armature 17; 16 is a M forks r ceive tide vibration but that. on o contact normally close to an associated coninciding in natural frequency with the fretact also on armature 17, but not normally quency of the tone s unded, vibrate mor making contact therewith; 18 is a second fully than the others. The vibration of this armature in connection with electromagreed or tuning fork actuates a circuit which n t 15; 19, 20, and 21 are contacts which causes one or mor tones to b sounded on any are normally close to associated contacts on musical instrument. In another arrangearmature 18 but not making contact therement this vibration actuates a circuit to which with; E is a switching metronome furth r is attached one or more oscillating devices of escribed in Figure 5; F is a battery or other audio frequencies, which oscillators produce source of currcnt; G is a piano each key of corresponding vibrations in another circuit. which has an electromagnet so applied as The latter circuitleads to an amplifying deto operate the key when current is induced vice, which causes the tones so produced'from in the electromagnet. the oscillators to be sounded from a loud The operator singing or playing tones into speaker, together with the original tone or the microphoneA causes electrical vibrations note sung or played into the microphone. to be set up in the primary 1 of transformer f I n s a o u By suitable switching means, different combl- B, and by induction the same vibrations are sounded into microphone A, into vibration.

Assuming that reed 5 is so vibrated, then contact 10 is brought into contact with its associated contact on reed 5 and current flows from battery F .through metronome E,

through reed base and reed 5 to contact 14,

through armature 17 of locking relay D, through the coil of electromagnet 15 and back to battery F. This current so flowing causes armature 17 to be drawn toward electro-magnet 15, thereby closing contact 16 and its associated contact on armature l7, and simultaneously breaking contact 14 and causing-armature 17 to stay against electromagnet 15 until the current from battery F is broken off. At the same time as electromagnet 15 pulls armature 17 towards it, armature 18 is also likewise pulled towards it and contacts 19, 20, and 21 are closed with their associated contacts on armature 18'. The closing of these contacts causes the three electro-magnets 22, 23, and 24 to play their respective notes on piano G. The swltching metronome E operates .at any desired frequeney, so that at the end of its beat it releases locking relay D. If the same tone is still being sounded into the microphone A upon the return of the metronome into its next beat, the locking relay will again lock causing the three keys to be again sounded on the pianoG and the metronome will again release locking relay D at the end of the second beat. v

In this particular arrangement any type of instrument which translates sound vibra tions into electrical vibrations, may be used for microphone A and transformer B. Any type of resonance meter may be substituted and modified readilyv to serve the function of tone selector C. The locking relay D and metronome E may be of any type, or may be omitted altogether as-theyare not essential to the operation of the system or instrument. Any suitable type of instrument may be substituted for piano G.

In Figure 2, A is a microphone, X is a battery or other source of current; B is a transformer, 1 is the primary and 2a, 2b, and 2c are the secondaries; is a selector device of audio frequencies, 3a, 3b, and 3c are coils in magnet relation to tuning forks 4, 5, and 6 respectively, the tuning forks having varying natural audio frequencies; 9, 10, and 11 are contacts normally close to associated contacts on one'leg of tuning forks 4, 5, and 6 respectively, but not making contact therewith; D1, D2, and D3 are looking relays of which 15a, 15b, and 150 are the electro-magnets; 14a, 14b, and 140 are contacts normally mak ing contact with associated contacts on arma- .ture 17a, 17 b, and 17 0 respectively; 16a, 16b,

and 160 and 19a, 19b, and 190 and 20a, 20b and 20c'are other contacts normally close to associated contacts on armatures 17a, 17b, and 170' respectively, but not'making contact therewith; E is a switching metronome; F is a battery or other source of current; H1, H2, and H3 are electron tube oscillators; J is a transformer, of which 35a, 35b,*and 350 are primaries connected to electron tube oscillators H1, H2, and H3 respectively; 38 is also a primary of transformer J; 36 is the secondary of transformer J in inductive relation to primaries 35a, 35b, 35c, and 38; K is an amplifying device and L is a loud speaker.

The operator, singing or playing tones into microphone A, causes electrical vibrations to be set up in the primary 1 of transformer B, and by induction the same vibrations are set up in the seconda which cause the same vibrations in the coils 3a, 3b, and 30 connected to the secondaries 2a, 2b, and 20 respectively. The vibrations so set up in coils 3a, 3b, and 30, which are in magnetic relation to tuning forks 4, 5, and 6 respectively, will cause one of the tuning forks whose natural frequency coincides with the tone sounded into micro hone A, to vibrate freely. Assuming that t 's frequency coincides with the natural frequency of tuning fork 4, tuning fork'4 will vibrate and bring the contact 9 into contact with its associated contact on tuning fork 4I The closing of these contacts causes current to flow from battery F, through metronome E, through tuning fork 4 and contact 9 to contact 14a, which is normally closed with its associated contact on armature 17a, through armature 17a and coil 15a back to battery F. This current so flowing, causes armature 17a to be drawn against ele'ctro-magnet 15a, thereby closing contact 16a and its associated contact on armature 17a and locking armature 17a against eleetro-magnet 15a as long as current flows from battery F, at the same time breaking the connection at contact 14a and simultaneously closing contacts 19a and of transformer 13 20a with their associated contacts on'armature 17a. The closing of contacts 19a and 2011 causes electron tube oscillators H3 and H2 to oscillate. tube oscillators are by inductance transferred from primaries 35b and 350 into secondary 36 of transformer J. The original tone sung or played into microphone A is induced into The oscillations of these electron for microphone A and transformer B. Any type of resonance meter may be substituted and modified readily to serve the functions of tone selector C. The locking relays D1,

D2, and D3 and metronome E may be of any type to serve the purpose or may be omitted altogether as they are not essential to the successful operation of the instrument. Any type of oscillator may be used instead of the electron tube oscillator shown, such as mercury arc oscillator, audio oscillator, impulse generator and any other known device giving the same results. Any number of oscillators may be connected for a given tone by adding contacts to armatures 17a, 17 b, etc. Any desired range of tones may be covered by adding additional tuning forks to the selector device- In Figure 3, A is a microphone; X is a battery or other source of current; B is a transformer, with 1 the primaries and 2a, 2b, and 2c the secondaries; C is a' selector device and oscillating device combined; 3a, 3b and 3c are coils in magnetic relation to turning forks 4, 5, and 6 respectively which have varying natural audio frequencies; 9, 10, and 11 are contacts normally close to the associated contacts on one leg of tuning forks 4, 5, and 6 respectively, but not makin contact therewith; D1, D2, and D3 are locking relays of which 15a, 15b, and 150 are the respective electromagnets. 14a, 14b, and 140 are contacts normally making contact with associated contacts on armatures 17a, 17b, and 170 respectively; 16a, 166, 160, and 19a, 19b, 19c, and 20a, 20b, 200 are other contacts normally close to associated contacts on armatures 17 a, 176, and 17 0 respectively, but not making contact therewith; E is a switching metronome; F is a battery or other source of current; 40, 41, and 42 are field coils in magnetic relation to tuning forks 4, 5, and 6 respectively; 46, 47, I

and 48 are armature coils with their core magnets 49, 50, and 51 respectively, in inductive relation to ends of tuning forks 4, 5, and 6 respectively; condensers 63, 64, and 65 are in series with the armature coils 46, 47, and 48 respectively.

Coils 40, 41, and 42 are actuated through contacts 19a, 19?), and 190 and 20a, 20b, and 200 respectively in the same manner as are oscillators H1, H2, and H3 by the same numbered contacts in Figure 2. These field coils 40, 41, 42 magnetize tuning forks 4, 5, 6 respectively, and their contacts 43, 44, respectively, cause the tuning forks to vibrate in their natural frequencies setting up 1esultant oscillations in the resonant circuit composed of the armature coils 46, 47, and 48, condensers 63, 64, and and primary coils 35a, 35b, and 350 of transformer J. K is an amplifier and L is a loud speaker. The operation of the balance of the instrument coincides with the description given for Figure 2.

In Figure 4, I show a diagrammatic View of a. practical switching arrangement for changing the connections between the selector device and the oscillators as such changes are Others may be added for spread chords, andv various combinations or variations of chords and high and low notes, as required. Additional switches may be provided which throw retardation coils in series with the electromagnets 22, 23, etc. in Figure 1 or with oscillators H1,H2, etc. in Figure 2 thus obtaining the eflect of runs and trills. In the switch diagram, I show a practical switching arrangement for all the-notes on one octave, from C to B inclusive, when singing or playing in the key of C. In Figure 4, 71 to 82, inclusive, are the contacts 19a and 20a etc. as shown in Figures 1, 2, and 3 as contacts of locking relays D, D1, D2, and D3. A is the master switch for the one key of C. The illustration shows the tumbler for Key of C depressed and ready for operation. Wires 91 to 99 inclusive will lead to electro-magnets .22, 23, etc., in Figure 1, or to electron tube oscillators H1, H2, etc., in Figure 2 or to field coils 40, 41, etc., in Figure 3. In case contacts 71 are closed, as will occur upon the operation detailed for the locking relay which we will assume is the one operated when the tone is played or sung into the microphone, the leads marked E and G are then connected therewith, through the switch A, causingtheir respective electro-magnets or oscillators to be put into operation as covered in the descriptions given for Figures 1, 2, 3. By adding additional contacts to armatures 17 or 18 of the locking relays D, D1, etc., and providing additional contacts and switch fingers to master switch A, any number of tones may be provided in the musical accompaniment. The switch shown is manually operated. It may of course be operated by means of a remotely controlled locking relay, if operating conditions require.

In Figure 5, I disclose the metronome which may be used in connection with my invention. A represents an ordinary metronome. The source of current is connected at any point on segment 2. Swing switch arm 3 carries the current to the binding post and pivot 1 from segment 2 through a brush in the bottom end of the switch arm. The connection from the metronome is made at binding post 1. The metronome swings the switch arm into positions 5 and 6 alternately, breaking the circuit at each swing, since it carries 133 the arm and brush contact on the end there of past the end of metallic segment 2. The circuit is closed as long as the switch arm is on the segment. f

This invention may take a Contacts 19, and 21 would be located on the bottom of the iano key so that ressure upon the key would close them, there y causing electro-magnets 22, 23 and 24 to play their respective notes on piano G. Another arrangement would replace the. reeds of the .audio frequency selector device with the piano keyboard, thereby operating the locking relay D with metronome E in the circuit, by

having contacts 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 on the piano keys and closing with their associated contacts' 9, 10. 11, 12 and 13 when the various keys are depressed. In neither of these arrangements is microphone, C, battery X and transformer B required.

This arrangement may consist of a piano for operating purposes and another one for playing the accompaniment, or operation maybe on the same instrument which plays the accompaniment. Another arrangement would consist of a control keyboard for the purpose of actuating the melody and accompaniment on the piano or other musical instrument. With such a control keyboard any number of adaptable musical instruments could be caused to play the melody and accompaniment merely by playing the melody itself on the control keyboard. With any of these arrangements it would be advisable to have a series of twelve master switches, such as the one pictured in-Figure'4, so that the musical accompaniment would be proper for any key in which the melody might be played. If an operator desired to play a melody in the key of C. for instance, the-switch for the key ofG would be depressed or raised as the case might be to make the connections. This would connect to all the keys on the control board. chords which would berelative to the key of C. The basis for all the natural tones in a given key would be the chords of the tonic, the dominate and the sub-dominate. For other than natural or normal tones, appropriate chords would be used for accompaniment.

While I have illustrated several practical embodiments of my invention. modifications, substitutions and variations will occur topersons skilled in the art, and all such are included and considered to fall within the scope and spirit of my invention. In the appended claims it is intended to cover all the noveltv that the invention may possess.

What is claimed is:

1. In a music producing system means whereby chordsharmonous to a melody are automatically produced by the production of the melody.

2. In an instrument of the type set forth, means-for receiving sound waves, aselector means 'forutilizing said sound waves so re ceived as a means of causing other sound Y waves to be sounded, the latter waves to pro-- vide harmonious chord accompaniment for the former sound waves.

3. In an instrument of the type set forth, means for receiving musical tone waves, a selector means for utilizing said musical tone waves so received as a means of causing other musical tone waves to be emitted from a music producing instrument, the latter musical tone waves to provide harmonious chord accompaniment for the former musical tone waves.

4. In an instrument of the type set forth, an audio frequency selector device, a switching metronomeand a musical instrument having connections enabling it to be operated by the frequency selector device.

5. In an instrument of the type set forth, means for rece ving sound waves, a selector means for utilizing said sound waves so received as a means of causing other sound waves to be sounded, the latter sound waves to provide musical accompaniment for the former sound waves. 1

6. In an instrument of the type set forth, means for receiving musical tone waves, a selector means for utilizing said musical tone oscillating devices, an amplifier, a loud speak-' er, and a source of current.

8. In an-instrument of the type set a microphone, an audio frequency selector device, a plurality of locking relays, a switching metronome, a musical instrument in operative relation to the audio frequency seswitching means for changing the relationship of the difierent frequency units .of the selector device to the various tone units of the musical instrument.

9. Ina-n instrument of the .tvpe set forth, an audio frequency selector device, a plurality of locking relays, a switching metronome, a plurality of oscillating devices of audio frequencies, switching means for changing the relationshlp of the different frequency units of the selector device to the oscillating device, and a source of current.

10. In an instrument of the type set forth, an audio frequency-selector device, a switching metronome, a plurality of oscillating devices of audio frequencies, switching means for changing the relationship of the different frequency units of the selector device to the oscillating devices and a source of current.

forth, I

'110 lector device, a source of current, and a izs Tao

11. In an instrument of the type set forth, a source of sound waves operating an audio frequency selector device the various frequen- 'cy units of which close locking relays when in operation, a switching metronome means for opening the locking relays, a plurality of oscillating devices of audio frequencies operated when the locking relays are closed, switching means for changing the relationship of the different frequency units of the selector device to the oscillating device and a source of current.

12. In an instrument of the type set forth, a source of sound waves, an audio frequency selector device operated by the sound waves, a plurality of oscillating devices of audio frequencies having connections-enabling them to be operated by the selector device through a switching metronome, switching means for changing the relationship of the various frequency units of the selector device to the various oscillating devices and a source of cur rent.

13. In an instrument of the type set forth an audio frequency selector device and a musical instrument having connections enabling it to be operated by the selector device.

14. An instrument of the type set forth comprising a source of sound waves in opera tive relation to an audio frequency selector de' vice the various frequency units of which have connections enabling them to operate an 0s cillating device of various audio frequencies through a switching metronome.

15. An instrument of the type set forth comprising a source of sound waves in operative relationship to an audio frequency selector device, the various frequency units of which have connections enabling them to o erate a musical instrument through a switc ing metronome.

16. An instrument of the type set forth comprising a source of sound waves in operative relation to an audio frequency selector device the various frequency units of which have connections enabling them to operate an oscillating device of various audio frequencies through an intermittent switching device.

17. An instrument of the type set forth comprising a source of sound waves in operative relationship to an audio frequency selector device the various frequency units of which have connections enabling them to operate a musical instrument through an intermittent switching device.

In witness whereof, I hereunto subscribe my name this 14th day of May A. D. 1930.

EMORY D. I-IECOX. 6Q

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7563975Sep 13, 2006Jul 21, 2009Mattel, Inc.Music production system
Classifications
U.S. Classification84/715, 984/348, 84/DIG.210, 984/378, 381/118, 333/200
International ClassificationG10H1/38, G10H5/00
Cooperative ClassificationG10H1/38, Y10S84/21, G10H5/005
European ClassificationG10H5/00C, G10H1/38