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Publication numberUS1894722 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 17, 1933
Filing dateMar 5, 1931
Priority dateMar 5, 1931
Publication numberUS 1894722 A, US 1894722A, US-A-1894722, US1894722 A, US1894722A
InventorsAdams Robert E
Original AssigneeAdams Robert E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf game apparatus
US 1894722 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 17, 1933. R. E. ADAMS GOLF GAME APPARATUS Filed March 5, 1931 4 sheetse sheet 1 W 1, mm a h. .W W m" j m J.

Jan. 17, 1933. v R. E. ADAMS 1,894,722

- I GOLF GAME APPARATUS Filed March 5, 1931 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Jan. 17, 1933.

R. E. ADAMS 1,894,722

GOLF GAME APPARATUS Filed March 5, 1931 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 I gwucnioz Jan. 17, 1933 R. E. ADAMS GOLF GAME APPARATUS Filed March 5, 1931 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Patented Jan. 17, 1933 PATENT OFFICE ROBERT E. ADAMS, or new YORK, N. Y.

GOLF GAME APPARATUS Application filed March '5, 1931. Serial No. 520,416.

This invention relates to game apparatus and more particularly to apparatus for use in restricted areas for playing a modified game of golf.

As distinguished from miniature golf, the present invention contemplates the use of full size balls and clubs, the same as are used for the standard game.

In order, however, to permit the players to drive the ball with the same force that they would use if playing the regular game, I provide yielding means for arresting the flight of the ball,-so that the ball is brought to rest within a relatively short distance.

The invention further contemplates the provision of means for causing the ball, after its flight has been thus arrested, to continue to move or roll in substantially the same general direction in which it was travelling. in this way, the ball will come to rest on or adjacent the green or on or adjacent a hazard, in accordance with the direction in which it has been driven, justas in a regular ame. 25 b More specifically, I propose to provide one or more curtains for arresting the flight of the ball, and I propose to paint or otherwise depict upon these curtains a representation of the green and associated hazards, showing them in the same relative position which they actually occupy at the rear of such curtains. In order that the invention may be readily understood, reference is had to the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a plan view of one arrangement of my improved apparatus;

Figure 2 is a central vertical section through the same on the line 22 of Figure 1;

will be understood that my improved apparatus is especially designed for use indoors or in other restricted spaces. 1 designates a tee from which the ball may be driven by use of the usual clubs. Extending across what corresponds to the fairway, and in front of the players position at the tee is a vertically disposed hanging curtain, shown as comprising three sections 2, 3 and 4:, suspended from a horizontal frame 5 supported by vertical frame members 6 setinto the floor or other playing surface. By reference to Figure 1, it will be seen that the curtain sec tions are disposed at different angles, the middle section 3 extendingdirectly across the line between the tee and green and the other two sections being disposed at each side of the section 3 and extending at an angle thereto and to each other, being inclined outwardly toward the tee. Furthermore, the side sections 2 and a are preferably offset with respect to the section 3 and are located somewhat nearer the tee, as clearly shown in Figure 1. The result of this is that the three curtain sections, when viewed 7 from the front, present an unbroken c0ncave surface.

Beneath each curtain section is an inclined surface, such surfaces being designated 7 8 and 9, and each surface sloping rearwardly in a direction away from the tee.

The lower edge of each curtain section, which preferably carries a rod 16,-as shown in Figure 2, is spaced slightly from the inclined surface, such as 8, so as to provide an opening 10 of suficient size to permit a golf ball to pass freely therethrough.

Extending across the fairway between the tee 1 and the above described curtain sections is a transversely disposed vertical fixed shield or barrier 11. This is illustrated as made of flexible material supported on a frame 12 set into the floor or the like, and having at its lower edge a rod 17. This rod is preferably either fastened to the floor or secured to the side members of the frame 12, so as to hold the shield or barrier 11 in fixed position.

This shield or-barrier is relatively low, as compared with the curtain sections, but is of 100 such height as to prevent a ball from being driven directly against the high portion of the inclined surfaces 7, 8 and 9,01 through the space 10 between such surfaces and the curtain sections. Preferably, the shield or barrier 11 is of such height as to prevent the spaces or openings 10 from being visible to a player standing at the tee.

As clearly shown in Figure 1, a green is 10 designated at 13 and is arranged behind the curtain sections, above described. Preferably it is disposed directly behind the central section 3. Adjacent and on either side of this green may be located hazards of various kinds, such as bunkers 14 and sand tra s 15.

eferring again to Figures 2 and 3, I propose to paint or otherwise depict upon the curtain sections 2, 3 and 4, a representation of the green and hazards which are behind the curtain sections. Thus, in Figure 3 I have shown depicted upon the curtain sections a green 13", bunkers 14* and sand traps 15, which, it will be seen, correspond in their location and relative position to the elements 13,14 and 1.), shown in Figure 1. Thus, when a player drives off from the tee, he can see before him a representation of the green and hazards, and he can thus be guided in his efforts to properly direct the ball.

When the ball is driven, it strikes one of the curtain sections 2, 3 or 4:, and its flight is thereby arrested, the curtain yielding sufficiently to prevent any substantial rebound,

; The ball strikes the curtain and falls dead to the lower edge thereof, where it rolls down the sloping r inclined surface, such as 8, and passes between such surface and the lower edge of the curtain. It will be seen that the maximum angle of slope of each of the surfaces 7, 8 and 9 is at substantial right angles to the corresponding curtain section. As result, a ball falling upon any of these surfaces will roll in a direction substantially at right angles to the corresponding curtain.

As a result of the above arrangement, it will be seen that when a ball strikes one of the curtain sections, and has its flight thus arrested, it will fall upon the corresponding inclined surface beneath the curtain and will roll down such surface, continuing to move in the same general direction as that in which it was travelling when it struck the curtain. Therefore, if the player makes a perfect shot, and strikes the curtain section 3 near the middle, the ball will roll down the inclined surface 8, and will thus c011- tinue its movement in a direction toward the green 13, on which it will probably come to rest. If, on the other hand, the player drives the ball to one side, it will strike one of the curtain sections 2 or 1, and will roll down one of the inclined surfaces 7 or 9, in such a direction as will cause it to come to rest in or adjacent the hazards 14 and 15.

After having driven ofit' from the tee as described, the player will then walk around behind the curtain and proceed to make the hole in the green with as few strokes as possible, just as in a regular game. It will, of course, be understood that any desired types of clubs may be used during these subsequent strokes.

Referring now to Figures 4, 5 and 6, I have shown a slightly modified arrangement of apparatus embodying the same general principle. In these figures, I employ a tee 1, the same as in the first three figures, and arrange a green 13 surrounded by hazards such as bunkers 1 1 and sand traps 15.

Extending transversely across the fairway at right angles to the line adjoining the tee and green is a single vertical curtain 18 supported on a frame 19 and having at its lower edge a rod 22 to stiffen the same. Beneath this rod is disposed a single rearwardly inclined surface 8, this surface being spaced from the lower edge of the curtain to provide an opening through which the ball may freely pass.

Disposed in front of this curtain 18 is a relatively low shield or barrier 20, supported at its upper edge 21 by a member secured to the frame 19, and having at its lower edge a rod 23 which may be secured to the floor or frame 19 so as to hold the barrier in fixed position. a

As before, I paint or otherwise depict upon the screen 18 a representation of the green and hazards which are actually behind the screen, such representation showing these elements in the same relation which they actually occupy. Thus, there is depicted on the screen a green 13, bunkers 14 and sand pits corresponding respectively to the elements 13, 14 and 15, shown in Figure 4.

In order to increase the artistic effect, the upper edge 21 of the shield or barrier may be more or less irregular, as shown in Figure 6. The upper edge of the barrier 11, shown in Figure 3, may likewise be given an irregular contour, if desired.

Furthermore, there may be painted upon the curtains, such as 2, 3, 4 and 18 and also upon the shields or barriers 11 and 20, if desired, the representation of trees or shrubs, or other scenery tending to add reality to the golf course.

In using the apparatus shown in Figures 4 to 6, the ball driven by the player from the tee will strike the curtain 18 and fall to the lower edge thereof, where it rolls down the incline 8' through the space 10. If properly directed, the ball will roll out behind the curtain in the direction of the green 13. Otherwise, it will roll out to one side or the other and come to rest adjacent some of the various hazards.

It will be understood that should the ball, when driven from the tee, strike the shield or barrier 11 or 20, it will rebound to some extent and fall upon the fairway, from which position it must be driven by subsequent strokes, the same as in a regular game.

It will be further understood that a complete'golf course will be made up of nine or any other desired number of holes such as shown either in Figures 1 to 3 or Figures 4; to 6, such holes being disposed in sequence and so arranged as to best fit into the space available.

What I claim is:

1. Golf apparatus comprising a tee, fairway and green, a substantially vertical curtain interposed between the tee and green, and an inclined surface disposed beneath said curtain and sloping in a direction away from said tee, the lower edge of said curtain being adjacent said surface but spaced therefrom a distance sufficient to permit the passage of a ball.

2. Golf apparatus comprising a tee, fairway and green, a substantially vertical curtain interposed between the tee and green, an inclined surface disposed beneath said curtain and sloping in a direction away from said tee, the lower edge of said curtain being adjacent said surface but spaced therefrom a distance sufficient to permit the passage of a ball, and

a relatively low fixed barrier interposed between said curtain and tee, and extending transversely of the fairway, said barrier being of sufficient height to prevent a ball being driven from said tee directly through the space beneath said curtain.

3. Golf apparatus comprising a tee and green, and various hazards associated with the latter, a substantially vertical curtain means interposed between the tee and green to arrest the flight of the ball, and means causing the ball to move onward behind said ourtain means after its flight has been arrested, said curtain means having depicted on the front side thereof a representation 'of said green and hazards, showing the same in the same relative position which they actually occupy at the rear'of said curtain.

4. Golf apparatus comprising a tee, fairway and green, a substantially vertical curtain interposed between the tee and green, and serving to arrest the flight of the ball, and means for causing the ball to roll on beyond said curtain, after its flight has thus been arrested, in the same general direction in which it was traveling when it struck said curtain.

5. Golf apparatus comprising a tee and green, and various hazards associated with the latter, means interposed between said tee and green for arresting the flight of the ball, and means for causing the ball, after its flight has been arrested, to roll in the same general direction as that in which it was traveling,

whereby it will come to rest either on or adjacent the green or on or adjacent some hazard, in accordance with how it was driven from the tee.

6. Golf apparatus comprising a tee, fairway and green, a substantially vertical curtain interposed between the tee and green and comprising a plurality of sections disposed in different angular positions, an inclined surface disposed beneath each curtain section and sloping rearwardly therefrom, the direction of maximum slope of each surface being substantially at right angles to the plane of the corresponding curtain section, and each curtain section being spaced from such surface a distance suflicient to permit the passage of a ball.

In testimony whereof I affix my signature.

ROBERT E. ADAMS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6409607Apr 20, 1999Jun 25, 2002Jeffrey M. LibitGolf courses and methods of playing golf
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/158, 473/164
International ClassificationA63B69/36
Cooperative ClassificationA63B69/36
European ClassificationA63B69/36