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Publication numberUS1895243 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 24, 1933
Filing dateMar 15, 1929
Priority dateMar 15, 1929
Publication numberUS 1895243 A, US 1895243A, US-A-1895243, US1895243 A, US1895243A
InventorsRobert G Dort
Original AssigneeCelanese Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of coloring textile materials and product thereof
US 1895243 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. G. DORT Jan. 24, 1933.

METHOD OF COLORING TEXTILE MATERIALS AND PRODUCT THEREOF Filed March 15. 1929 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 MOIST SHEET HAVING DYE) Z MOIST SHEET s I HAVING DYE 2 2 MOIST SHEET 1 HAVING DYE) lNVENTOR Roberr G. Dori ATTORNEYS Jan. 24, 1933. R. G. DORT 1,895,243

METHOD OF COLORING TEXTILE MATERIALS AND PRODUCT THEREOF File d March 15. 1929 2' Sheets-Sheet 2 CELLULOSE ACETATE FABRIC- TEN A A DYE BATH/ a- /DYED CELLULOSE ACETATE FABRIC 5 JET 0F HEATED VAPOR OR GAS i7 T T3 2. I CELLULOSE ACETATE FABRK; 5 x I 3 Q2) /8\ STEAM sTENcn. CHAMBER 5H EET INVENTOR Roberr G. DorT BY 3W We WWW ATTO R N EYS Patented Jan. 24, 1933 UNITED STATES" Amman CORPORATION 01: minawaan PATENT ,orrlca noun 0. DORT, or NEW 1031:, 11.1., ASSIGNOB 'ro coaroiwrron or union or conoame rnx'rr'Ln m'mmns mraonuc'rf'rmnor" Application med Iarch 15,'1929. Serial No. 347,452,.

or which is carried in finelydivided form another vapor or gas at elevated temperatures. 1

' A further object of. m invention is to roduce upon textile materlals local color e ects or designs whose outlines are not sharp, by

' stuff may be applied to the fa do in any suitthe application of a dyestufi that is at least partially volatile. Other objects of my invention will appear from, the following detailed description.

In accordance with my invention, I apply locally in predetermined places or to the whole surface of atextile material a dyestufij or coloring matter that is readily volatile in steam or other hot gases or va ors. The dyeable form such as by meansof a transfer medium, or by applying in the form of a spray or jet as will be described below.

Any suitable textile materialmay be treated by my invention. It may be yarns wound in any suitable package such as hanks, cops, bobbins, etc. Preferably, however, the textile material to be treated is in the form of cellulose are'cellu'lose acetate, cellulose formate, cellulose propionate and cellulose buty rate, while examples of cellulose ethers are ethyl cellulose, methyl cellulose and benz l cellulose. The fabric need not consist wholly 'inobenzene cellulose acetate, to be colored.

of yarns of organic derivatives of cellulosebutmay alsocontain yarns ofother fibres.

This invention, is not restrictedto any articular dyestuflt's but is applicable to all ye-- stufi's that are at least partiallyvolatile in steam or other hot gaseous or vaporous material. By way of example, it is pointed out that the following water insoluble coloring matters which have an aflinity for textile ma: terials containing organic derivatives of. cellulose such as'cellulose acetate, are volatile in steam and are applicable in my invention:

4 nitrobenzene 1'-azo 4: amino 3'. 6dimethylbenzene (orange); 2-nitro-4- 'chlo'-4'- methyldiphenylamine (golden yellow) ';4-nitro-2-methox -benzene-azo -4' r dimeth lam- I (led); and 4'-nitro-2-1n'et oxybenzene-azo 4'-diethylaminobenzene (red) Referr1ng to the accompanying ,drawin s, Figs; 1 to 7, inclusive, show diagrammaticafi some of the many modes of carrying out this invention. a

There are many variations or modifications of the use of my invention and. a few of these' w11l be given below.

As" an example of the application of my 4 invention by the use of a transfer medium the followin is. given, ,reference being had to Fig. C fabric or sheet .1 of other material that isdyed with, or has the'volatile colormg matter thereon, is moistened with water from. the spray 2, and is superposed over the fabric 3, such as one containin "yarns of 4 his assembl is passed between hot smooth calender ro Is 4 and bmaintained at such a temperature as to cause the water to evaporate and steam to be generated. The steam so gen erated causesat least partf of the coloring matter or dyestuff to be volatilized from the fabricor'sheet used as a transfer medium and to be carried over to the fabric to be col-f; ored, whereby a color is imparted to the whole surface of the fabric to be colored. The fabric 1 is rolled upon roll 6, and the cellulose acetate. fabric is rolled'uponroll 7. i

As another exam le of the use of a transfer me um, e e in m F he a em y. of a moist or wet transfenmediuni l and fabric 3 to be dyed is passed between heated all 7 according to the type of pattern on the emthe fabric to be locally colored. In this mann er, 'color designs are produced and these designs may or may not have sharp outlines,

bossed or engraved rolls.

In another form of my invention involving the use of a transfer medium, as shown in Fig. 3, the assembly of moist or wet transfer medium 1 and fabric 3 to be locally colored is passed between heated embossing rolls 13 and 14 having male and female designs respectively; In this case it 'is preferable to employ a fabric having yarn made of thermoplastic material such as cellulose acetate, whereupon the fabric is simultaneously embossed and printed, the local color imparted to the fabric corresponding in outline to the embossed design.

In another form of my invention, thevolatile dyestufi is applied to the fabric in the form of a spray' or jet while it is being carried by steam or other hot gaseous or vaporous material. For this purpose, referring to Fig. 4, an ordinary spraying gun 15 such .as is used in the spraying of lacquers, may be used, wherein steam is employed instead of air as the spraying medium. I have found that wet steam has a greater volatilizing action thandry steam, and therefore such wet steam is referably employed. If temperatures hig er than 100 C. are required, the wet steam may be under such elevated "pressure as to attain such higher temperatures.

.Another mode of obtaining a spray, jet or stream of the dyestuff in volatile form (as shown in Fig. 5) is to bubble or inject moderately hotsteam; at moderate pressure through a solution 16 or. a colloidal suspension of such dyestufi in an aqueous or other medium. The solution of dyestufl is preferably concentrated, and the steam or other vapor is preferably of sufliciently high pressure and temperature to raise the solution to the boiling point, whereby the steam andthe volatilize yestufi leaving such solution is at sufliciently high temperature so that the same do not condense prior to the timethey are applied to the fabric to be colored. 1

The spray of volatile coloring matter and steam or other gaseous fluid may be applied to the whole surface of the fabric, but it is preferably applied only locally to the fabric. By directing the spray of the coloring material to-predetermined places, any desired designs may be-attained. In another form, the spray may be directed through stencils having a suitable design onto the fabric to be colored. An important application of my invention is to obtain the eifects known as ombre dyeing. In this ombre effect, the fabric is colored in various colors, one color blending into the other. Thus a. fabric may be'dyed red at the side corres ondingto one selvedge and this red progressively blend into an orange color and the orange color then progressively blend to a yellow until a pure yellow is obtained at the edge near the other selvedge. This effect may be attained by my process by first spraying a red dyestufi' along one selvedge and applying less and less dyestuif as the other selvedige is approached until finally no red dyestu is applied, and then applying a yellow dyestufi in the form of a spray to the other selvedge and gradually applyin less and less yellow (1 estufi' as the first selve ge is approached, w ereby the color will vary from bright red through orange to bright ellow, with no line of demarcation between the colors.

As another example of producing ombre dyeing effects, the fabric to be colored is stretched on an apparatus such as a tenter frame and while in a moist condition, has 'ets or sprays of dyestuffs a plied thereto. n order to obtain the color e ects above described, the part of the fabric near one selvedge will have a red dyestuif appliedthereto b means of a first jet, the second jet will app y a mixture of red dyestufi' with a little yellow dyestuff, the third jet will apply an orange dyestufi at a point substantially midway between the two selvedges, a fourth jet will apply a mixture of yellow dyestufi with a little red, while the fifth jet will apply a pure yellow dyestufli' along the other selvedge of thefabric. Inthis manner of treatment, in some cases it is not necessary to finish the goods after treatment, although such finishin is not excluded. 1

y invention may also be applied to obtain efi'ects analagous to discharge printing efiects. This may be done by dyeing the fabric with the volatile 'dyestulf, and then locally applying steam or other heated gases or vapors to the dyed fabric 3 in predetermined places, either by jets 17, as is shown in Fig. 6 or onto the fabric that is protected by stencils 18 as is shown in Fig. 7, whereby at least part of the dyestufi is volatilized from those places where the steam or other heated gas has been applied from the steam chamber 19.

In the cases where local color effects are obtained, because of the mode of procedure and the volatile nature of the dyestuffs or coloring materials employed, the outlines of the design are not sharp, but are rather clouded and gradually blend into the background. The eifects thus produced are highly ornamental, and are of .the nature usually obtained either by hand processes such as in Batik printing, or by other expensive methods.

I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent rials containing comprisin applying thereto on at least part s: v 1. The method of coloring textile materials comprising applying thereto on at least part of the surface thereof a readily volatilizable coloring material in substantially volatile form.

2. The method of coloring textile mate-. rials containing yarns of organic derivatives of cellulose, comprising applying thereto on at least part of the surface thereof a readily volatilizable coloring material in sub-.

stantially volatile form.

3. The method of coloring textile mateyarns of cellulose acetate,

of the sur ace thereof a readily volatilizable coloring material in substantially volatile form.

4. Method of producing local color effects on fabrics containing organic derivative of cellulose yarn comprising locally applying thereto volatilized dyestufi carried in a hot gas or vapor medium.

5. Method of producing local color effects on fabrics containing cellulose acetate yarn comprising locally a plying thereto volatilized dyestufl carrie 1n a hot gas or vapor medium.

6. Method of producing local color effects on fabrics containing organic derivatives of cellulose comprising applying to the fabric to be treated a transfer medium having thereon a readil volatilizable dyestufi, which transfer me ium is moistened or dampened with water, and then applying a heated surface in predetermined laces thereto.

7. Method of producing local color effects on fabrics containing cellulose acetate comprising applying to the fabric to be treated a transfer medium having thereon --a readily volatilizable dyestufl, which transfer medium is moistened or dampened with water, and then applying a heated surface in predetermined places thereto.

8. Method of producing local color effects and embossed designs on" fabrics containing organic derivatives. of cellulose comprising applying to the fabric to be treated a transfer medmm having thereon a readily volatilizable dyestufi, which transfer medium is moistened or dampened with water, and then passing the same between heated embossing devices.

9. Method of producing local color effects and embossed designs on fabrics containing cellulose acetate comprising applying to the fabric to be treated a transfer medium having thereon a readily volatilizable dyestufi,

which transfer medium ismoistened or dampened with water, and then passing the same .12. Method of producing ombre dyeing effects on fabric containing cellulose acetate yarn comprising spraying a volatile dyestuif of one color in progressively diminishing amounts from one side .thereof towards the other side, and then spraying a volatile dye= stu of another color of progressively in-' crgasing amounts towards the said other s1 e.

13. Method of producing local color effects on fabrics containing organic derivative of cellulose yarn comprising applying thereto a readily volatilizable dyestufl' and then locallyapplying a heated gas to the fabric.

14. Method of producing local color effects on fabrics containing cellulose acetate yarn comprising applying thereto a readily volatilizable. d estuif and then locally applyin a heate gas to the fabric.

15. ethod of producing local color effects on fabrics containing organic derivative of cellulose yarn comprising applying thereto a readily volatilizable dyestufl and then locally applying a heated gas to unprotected portions of the fabric.

16. Method of producing local color effects on fabrics containing cellulose acetate yarn com rising applying thereto a readily volatiliza le dyestufi and then locally applying a heated gas to unprotected portions of the fabric. a

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto subscribed my name.

' ROBERT G. DORT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3174816 *Apr 11, 1962Mar 23, 1965Celanese CorpContinuously dyeing and saponifying cellulose acetates and blends thereof between an impermeable blanket and a heated roller
US3850095 *Feb 19, 1970Nov 26, 1974Armstrong Cork CoEmbossing and valley printing of carpets by hot melt ink
US3868214 *May 4, 1972Feb 25, 1975Ashfield Dyeing & Finishing CoProcess for producing decorated fabrics
US3874846 *Jun 20, 1973Apr 1, 1975John M AsheTransfer printing method
US3880579 *Mar 19, 1973Apr 29, 1975P Lamaire & Cie Sa EtsThermo-printing process
US3949574 *May 29, 1974Apr 13, 1976Richard Donovan GloverSublimatic printing machine
US4047996 *Sep 15, 1975Sep 13, 1977Contemporary, Inc.Plastic plates adapted to be imprinted and methods of manufacturing and imprinting on plastic plates
US4057864 *Jun 27, 1975Nov 15, 1977Tootal LimitedWet transfer printing process and apparatus
US4059471 *Jan 13, 1975Nov 22, 1977Haigh John MTransfer dyeing of plastic surfaces which may be combined with lamination or molding procedures
US4063878 *Nov 12, 1975Dec 20, 1977Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyApplying sublimation indicia to pressure-sensitive adhesive tape
US4138945 *May 16, 1977Feb 13, 1979Thomas RejtoSimultaneous heat transfer printing and embossing method
US4223057 *May 16, 1977Sep 16, 1980Thomas RejtoSimultaneous transfer printing and embossing or surface texturing method, and embossing member for use therein
US4596190 *Jun 25, 1984Jun 24, 1986Rohm GmbhMethod for concurrently forming and hot-transfer printing a synthetic resin
US4644601 *Jan 10, 1985Feb 24, 1987A. Monforts Gmbh & Co.Method and apparatus for applying evaporable finishing means or textile material
US5298031 *Nov 4, 1992Mar 29, 1994Malden Mills Industries Inc.Method for treating velvet-like fabric which is simultaneously embossed and decorated
US5316552 *Dec 14, 1992May 31, 1994Jasper Warren JLine marking apparatus
WO1984004551A1 *May 5, 1984Nov 22, 1984Monforts Gmbh & Co AMethod and unit for coating an evaporable finishing agent on a textile material
Classifications
U.S. Classification8/470, 8/478, 8/149.2, 101/129, 8/471, 101/487, 101/491, 8/921, 101/470, 101/32
International ClassificationD06P5/28, D06B1/08, D06P5/24, D06P1/00, D06B1/02, D06B11/00
Cooperative ClassificationD06P5/008, D06B2700/04, D06B1/02, D06B1/08, D06P5/004, Y10S8/921, D06P1/0044, D06B11/00, D06B11/0059, D06B11/0076
European ClassificationD06B11/00, D06P1/00G, D06P5/00T2, D06B11/00J, D06P5/00T4B, D06B11/00G2, D06B1/02, D06B1/08