Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1896082 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 7, 1933
Filing dateApr 2, 1930
Priority dateApr 2, 1930
Publication numberUS 1896082 A, US 1896082A, US-A-1896082, US1896082 A, US1896082A
InventorsPhilip S Harper
Original AssigneePhilip S Harper
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Burner
US 1896082 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

P. s.. HARPER Feb. 7, 1933.

BURNER Filqd April 2, 1930 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Feb; 7, 1933. P. HARPER BURNER Filed April 2, `195o 2 sheets-sheet 2 Patented Feb. 7, 19.33

PHILIP S. HARPER, OF CHICAGO, IILINOIS BURNER Application led April 2, 1930. Serial No. 440,895.

This invention relates to burners and to their arrangement on a gas range whereby combination giantand. simmer burners may be used on the rear burners of the range, and particularly where all four burners on the conventional four burner cooking top may be -of this double or combination type. And this invention discloses an advanta-v geous construction and arrangement of such burners.

' Heretofore it has been possible to use as many as two such burners on a range, but I have here devised a range having four burners each having two sections.

.The object of this invention is to provide a range having four combination large and simmer burners.

Another object of this invention is to d evise suchburners so that they can be economically manufactured. y

Another object of this invention is to provide a symmetrical arrangement of the simmer sections of the burners on the cooking top.

Another object of this invention is to arrange the simmer burners where the flames are easily seen for adjustment. y

Another object of this invention is to provide such simmer parts of said burners in such a position and with such a. grate that a vessel may be placed centrally over each simmer burner Without danger of tipping.

' Another object of this invention is to pro- 'vide an arrangement for said burners whereby the front burners have their simmer portions further removed from the front frame of the range.

Another object of this invention is to eliminate. the placing of vessels centrally over simmer sections in a disadvantageous position near the frame of the stove, so elimlnating some of the heating and damagin of the enamelled frame sometimes atten ant upon other arrangements.

These and other objects of this invention will be more apparent from the following description and from the drawings, in which- Figure 1 is a view of one arrangement of thestove top 'and burners of my invention;

Figure 2 is a sectional view taken on the line 2-2 of Figure l;

Figure 3 isa partial sectional view of the front burner shown in Figure 1, the section being taken on line 3-3; 55

Figure 4 is a transverse section of the front burneii` taken along the line 4 4 of Figure 1; an

Figure 5 is a transverse section through the rear burner taken on line 5-5 of Figure 1. 60 Referring now to the drawings, Figures l and 2 show a stove top frame 10 to which is secured a manifold pipe l1.` This manifold has gas cocks 12, 12a, 12b, and 12o of the type disclosed inmy copending application Serial No. 267,223, tiled April 4, 1928, which has resulted in Patent No. 1,836,242, issued December 15, 1931. These cocks each 'have a. forward projecting operating stem 13 on which is fastened a handle 14. Said 70 cocks on their inner ends each have an upper nozzle 15 and a lower nozzle 16, each nozzle projecting into a separate mixing tube in one of the burners, all in accordance with my above mentioned copendin application. 75 The operating stem 13 on eac cock projects through a plate or shield 17 as shown.

. Taking now the gas cock 12b, the nozzles thereon 15 and V16 project into mixing tubes 18 and 19 respectively of front burner 20 30 shown in Figs. 3 and 4 `and said mixing tubes 18 and 1 9 lead respectively to burner sections 21 'and 22, said burner sections each having burner ports 23 and 24 in the top wa1l25 and 26 of said burner. It is seen that the mixing 85 tube 19 vcurves around and `enters the rear of the burner section 22 while the small mixing tube 18 enters the small burner section 21 more directly at the side of the burner as shown. Both mixing tubes 18 and 19 are po- 90 sitioned one over the other as lshown, and both enter to the right side of the burner making what we shall designate as a left-hand burner since its proper position is to the left on theV cookingftop. An air shutter and 65a.'is 95 also shown as disclosed and arranged in m Patent No. 1,664,509, issued April 3, 1928.

The right-hand front burner 28 is similar in every way to the left-hand burner 20 aboiei described except that' its respective mixingfoo tubes enter and extend along the left of the burner as shown.

Cocks 12 and 12o have nozzles projecting intomixing tubes 30 and 31 in burners 32 and 32a, as shown in Figure 5, these mixing tubes leading to burner sections 33 and 34 respectively, each section having burner ports 34a and 35 in the upper walls thereof 36. Said mixing tubes are also positioned one above the other and extend beneath the front burners 20 and 28 as shown, and lie directly on the center line of the rear burner so placing the small simmer section 33 on the forward end in each case of the two rear burners 32 and 32a. These two rear burners 32 and 32a are both exactly similar, being different in this respect from the front burners 20 and 28 which are made in a left and right design to properly fit on the stove as described in this specification.

This construction where the two mixing tubes pass beneath the front burner, is particularl advantageous since it provides substantial y straight cores for the rear burner, making rear burners of this type possible of manufacture without undue production difficulty. The core for mixing tube 30 and section 33 is necessarily made very small in order to make a burner that works properly, and great diiiculty is experienced in manufacturing the same in two halves with a central vent as is usual in gas burner cores, since there is hardly a sufficient body of sand in either half to contain a strengthening wire for the core. But the core may be made in a single half and flat on one side, so providing a sufficient body of core sand to contain a strengthening wire, and also since the core is straight for the greater part of its length, a venting hole may be made by means of a so-called vent rod or vent wire, so simplifying the manufacture of burners of this type in a Way that would not be possible with curved cores as commonly used for rear burners. It is also advantageous to have a straight vent in such a small core the length as possible, less liable to clog up with particles of sand and there is less blowing of castings and consequent loss in manufacture.

All four top burners, as shown, have two sections as 21 and 22 in the burner 20, vthese sections being incorporated in what we shall designate in burner 20 as a burner head 40 having prongs 41 and 42.- The prong 41 contains only the small section 21 whereas all the remainder of the prongs contain and are 1part of the larger section of the'burner 22.

The beforementined burner ports 23 -in theprong 41 are about equivalent in burning capacity to .the ports 24 in any of the other prongs, consequently the burner head 40 has the ports`-in its vtop surface arranged in a substantially balanced manner around a central point which is the center of said burner `pendicular for as great a part ofv 4as a straight vent is head as indicated at 43 at the intersection of the center lines 44 and 45. Said center line 45 is drawn substantially perpendicular to said manifold 11, and said center line also passes through the center of the burner head 46 of the burner 32 at the intersection with center' line 47. Said center line 47 is drawn substantially parallel with said manifold 11 and said center line 47 also passes throuh the center 48 of the burner head 49 of t e burner 32a :it the intersection with center line 50 which is drawn substantiallyV perto the manifold 1 1. Said last center line 50 intersects the previous center line 44 approximately at the center 51 of the burner head 52 of burner 28.

The burner head 40 has all its ports 23 and 24 in both sections arranged within the area of the usual cooking vessel, and this is like- Wise true of the other three burners shown, 28, 32 and 32a.

The bur-ners 20 and 28 are designated as front burners since they are nearer the operating handles 14 of the valves 12, 12a, 12b and 12e, whereas the rear burners 32 and 32d are farther removed from said operating handles 14.

The gas cocks 12 and 120 are located on the center lines 50 and 45 of their respective burners 32a and 32, while the cocks 12a and 12b are placed on the manifold 11 between the two center lines 5() and 45 as shown.

A grate 37 is shown extending over the burners 28 and 32a and a similar grate is also placed over burners 2O and 32. This grate 37 hasparallel bars 38, and said bars 38 are desirably made sufciently long so that the distance X between the ends of mating bars is less than one-half the diameter of the smallest vessel used, whereby said vessel may be shifted laterally on said grate from the center of one of the front burners as 20 to the center of the respective simmer section thereon as 21 Without danger of tipping between the grate bars. This distance X in practice should not be over two inches and is most desirably from one inch to one and one-half inches. The position of the simmer section 33 on the rear burners 32 -is also such that the form of grate shown eliminates tipping of utensils when small vessels are moved to the position over the center of the simmer sections 33.

It may be seen, therefore, that I have devised a practical means of incorporating four double cored burners in a gas range, such an arrangement having never before been used or considered possible of practical attainment.

While I have described more or less precisely the details of construction, I do not wish to be understood as limiting myself thereto, as I contemplate changes in form' and the proportion of parts and the substitution of equivalents as circumstances may suggest or frame, a rear burner having two sections and two mixing tubes, said nozzles on said cock being arranged to proJect one mto each of sald mixin-g tubes, a front burner having a burner head, and a gas cock connected to said front burner, said mixing tubes extendin horizontallyT wholly below the level of sai front burner head, one of said tubes being placed abovethe other.

2. In a gas range the combination of a front burner, a rear burner, a gas cock, said rear burner having two mixing tubes said' gas cock having two nozzles, each of said nozzles projecting into one of said mixing tubes, saidv mixing tubes extending beneath said front burner, and a second as cock connected to said front burner, sa1d cocks and said mixin tubes being lowered so that space is provide c whereby one of said mixing tubes is located between said' front burner and the other of said mixing tubes. f

3. In aA gas range, a manifold, gas cock screwed into said manifold, a burner havin burner ports in connection with one of sai cocks, a second burner having burner ports in connection with another of said cocks, the second burner having `burner ports located at a greater distance from said manifold than the lirst burner, the second burner having two mixing tubes and the second cock havin two gas nozzles yprojecting substantially orizontally respectively therein, `Said mixing tubes in said second burner extending beneath the burner ports in said first burner, said mixing tubes in said second burner being so lowered that space is provided whereby one of said tubes is located between said front burner and the other of said tubes.

4. In a gas range, a cooking to a manifold arranged at the front end of sai cooking to a front double section burner, a rear doub e section burner, the said front burner having one of its sections to the side of its center line perpendicular to said manifold, the said rear burner having one of its sections to the front of its center line parallel to said manifold, and a gas cock in connection with each of said burners.

5. In a gas range, a top frame, amanifold arranged with gas cocks thereon at one end of said frame, a system of f our double section burners connecting with said gas cocks,

, two of said burners having sections in right and left positions with respect to their respective center lines perpendicular to said manifold,` and the remaining two burners having all their sections substantially symmetrical with respect to the same center lines..

6. In a gas range, a manifold, gas cocks in said manifold connecting with a system of two burners, said burners being arranged substantially on a center line perpendicular to said manifold, at least one of said burners havin two mixing tubes, said mixing tubes being oth positioned in lateral displacement from said center line, a burner section connected with each of said mixing tubes, said mixing tubes having a common casing for a portion of their length and one of said mixing tubes extending in a single casing beyond the other of said tubes.

7. In a gas range, a manifold having four gas cocks thereon, each of said cocks having two nozzles, a burner connecting with each of' said cocks, each of said burners having two mixing tubes connecting with two burner sections each having burner ports in the top thereof arranged within the area covered by the usual cooking-vessel, the two nozzles on each of said cocks projecting respectively into the two mixin tubes in each of said burners, said cockslliavi-ng handle means, two of Said burners having at least a portion of all sections on'the handle means'side of their common center line, and the other two burners having at least a portion of all sections on the opposite side of their common center line from said handle means, two of said burners being acommon length and made right and left hand.

8. ln a gas range, a manifold having four gas cocks thereon, each of said cocks having two nozzles, a burner connecting with each of said cocks, each of said burners having two mixing tubes connecting with two burner sections each having burner ports in the top thereof arranged within the area covered by the usual cooking vessel, said sections comprising a burner head,`the two nozzles on each of said cocks projecting respectively into the two mixing tubes in each of said burners, the mixing tubes on vtwo of said burners extending a further distance to their respective burner sections, than the mixing tubes in the other two of said burners, each of said other two burners having one section larger than the other, each of said other two burners having their small sections on a common cen- 1 ter line between the centers of their respective burner heads, said other two burners being made right and left hand.

9. A top frame, a manifold supported at a lower level than the top of said top frame, gas cocks screwed vertically into said manifold, a plurality of burners supported below said top frame, operating stems projecting from said gas cocks, at least oneof said burners having two mixing tubes, at least one of said cocks having two gas nozzles projecting each into one of said mixing tub'es, at least one of said mixing tubes being laterally displaced from a line perpendicular to the `said manifold through the center of said burner, said mixing tube entering a burner substantially on a center line of said burner drawn parallel to said manifold.

10. A top rame,a manifold supported at a lower level than the top of said top frame, gas cocks screwed vertically into said manifold, a plurality of burners supported below said top frame, operating stems projecting from said gas cocks, at least one of said burners having two mixing tubes, at least one of said cocks having two gas nozzles projecting each into one of Vsaid mixing tubes, both of said mixing tubes being laterally displaced from a line perpendicular to the said manifold through the center of said burner, one of said latter mixing tubes entering said burner wholly Vto one side of said center line, and entering said burner at least partially on the side away from said gas cocks of another center line drawn through said burner parallel to said manifold.

11. In a gas range, two rows of two burners in each row, a manifold pipe substantially perpendicular to said rows, a plurality of gas cocks on said manifold at least one connected to each burner, two of said burners being equidistant from said manifold and each having two sections and two mixing tubes, the two cocks connected with said two burners each having two nozzles, each nozzle projecting into a mixing tube on said two burners, the said two cocks being positioned on said manifold a lesser distance a art than the distance between the centers o said two burners.

12. In a gas range, a rear top burner having two mixin tubes each leading to a burner section, sai sections having burner ports in the top thereof arranged within the area covered by the usual cookin vessel, a single gas cock with/two nozzles tliereon, each one projecting into one of said mixing tubes, one

of said sections being smaller than the other,

the mixing tube connected with said smaller section being in a single vertical plane intersecting said tube in its entire length, said gas cock nozzles being entirely below the level ofsaid burnersections.

13. In a gas range, a manifold with a plu- 'ality of gas cocks thereon, two front burn- `ers and two rear burners each having two mixing tubes and two burner sections, each mixing tube connecting with one of said sections, each of said two sections in each burner having burner ports in the top thereof, the

burner ports in the said two sections in each burner being arranged within the area of the usual cooking vessel, gas nozzles on said gas cocks, one of said nozzles projecting into each of said mixing tubes in the aforesaid burners, at least a portion of all of said burner sections being on the shortest line connecting all of said burner centers and all of said mixing tubes entering their respective burner sections atleast partially within the quadrangle so formed.

to the front of its center lineparallel to said .inanifold,. and a gas cock in connection with each of said burners.

15. In a gas range, a top burner having two mixing tubes each leading to a burner section, said sections being arranged within the area covered by the usual cooking vessel, said sections comprising a burner head, a single gas cock with two nozzles thereon, cach one projecting into one of said mixing tubesdone of said sections being smaller than the other, in any horizontal run of said tubes one of said tubes being above the other, said gas cock nozzles being wholly below the level of said burner head.

Signed at Chicago, Illinois, this 26th day .of March, 1930.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3096813 *Mar 12, 1959Jul 9, 1963Robertshaw Fulton Controls CoGas burner assemblies
US6425389 *Dec 23, 1998Jul 30, 2002Bsh Bosch Und Siemens Hausgeraete GmbhGas burner configuration for cooking areas
US6851420Sep 27, 2002Feb 8, 2005Bsh Home Appliances CorporationBurner with piloting ports
US7628609Jun 26, 2007Dec 8, 2009Electrolux Home Products, Inc.Hub and spoke burner with flame stability
US7871264Jun 26, 2007Jan 18, 2011Electrolux Home Products, Inc.Hub and spoke burner port configuration
US8057223Nov 9, 2009Nov 15, 2011Electrolux Home ProduceHub and spoke burner with flame stability
Classifications
U.S. Classification126/39.00N, 126/39.00H, 431/284, 126/39.00R
International ClassificationF23D14/64
Cooperative ClassificationF23D14/64
European ClassificationF23D14/64