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Publication numberUS1896092 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 7, 1933
Filing dateOct 8, 1931
Priority dateAug 7, 1931
Publication numberUS 1896092 A, US 1896092A, US-A-1896092, US1896092 A, US1896092A
InventorsMangiameli Francesco
Original AssigneeMangiameli Francesco
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for mixing gases
US 1896092 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb.- 7, 1933. F MANGIAMELI 1,896,092

APPARATUS FOR MIXING GASES 4 Filed Oct. 8, 1931 n ry- P INVENTOR I jzzl cesra/yagmw/ ATTORNEY Patented Feb. 7, v 1933 FRANCESCO MANGIAMELI, OF DUSSELDORF, GERMANY arraaa'ros ron mxme oases Application filed October .8, 1931, Serial 110.5673, and in Germany August 7, 1931.

or the like, and comprises a compound valve 5 device connected to the sources of supply of I the gases and to a mixing chamber, said valve device includinga casing having a cylindrical bore provided with parallel, peripheral series 1 of discharge ports communicating with. the mixing chamber and a valve plug in the casing operative to uncover any desired number of ports in one, series and simultaneously close a like number of ports in the other series; the apparatus preferably being associated with a novel means for balancing or equalizing the pressures of the gases in advance of the valve mechanism. a The invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in which Fig. 1 is a sectional elevation of the valve device and mixing chamber.

Fi '2 and 3 are sections on lines A---B and D, respectively, of Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is a sectional elevation of the pressure equalizing apparatus with the valve associated therewith shown in elevation.

Referring to Figs. 1 to 3 of the drawing, .1 a indicates the valve casing proper, which is provided with a cylindrical bore terminating in end chambers c and d, into which open supply ducts a and b, respectively, which ducts are in communication with the respective supplies of the gases to be mixed. The cylindrical bore ofvthe casing is provided with two peripheral series of discharge ports f and (7, respectively, each series extendin throng an arc of substantially 180 an communicatin with discharge ducts h and it formed in t e body of the casing and communicating with a common mixing chamber h, which may be formed as an integral part of the valve casin the outlets of the discharge reverse tively, the mixing chamber having a discharge outlet at adapted to be connected with the conduit leadin to the burners, blow torches or the like. @"tting within the cylindrical bore of the casin is a valve pluglor 0 member 0, the main y portion 0 w 'ch flow by check valves m and n, respecducts h an it being closed against is cylindrical and havin semi-cylindrical end sections on opposite sides adapted to be moved into and out of registry with the reposed at regular intervals and the ports ofthe respective series are made of such PI'B'? determined diameters as to insure passage of equal volumes of the gases'through each single port, thefdiametrical dimensions of the ports-being determined by the densities of the respective gases.

By the particular construction and arrangement of the elements of the valve mechanism, as described, it will be seen that, when the valve member 6 is rotated, the ports of one series will be successively closed, while the ports of the other series will be simultaneously opened and, as each port in both series is designed to discharge the same volume of gas, the relative proportions of the gases delivered to the mixing chamber may be accuratel regulated. As illustrated in Fig. 1, all 0 the ports f are open, while all of the ports 9 are closed, so that only the gas reaching the valve device by way of the duct a will be delivered to the mixing chamber. By turning the valve plug e to close one port f, the same movement of the valve unco ers one port g. Continued rotation of the valve will effect the opening of the orts in the respective series in the order 0 8-2, 7-3, 6-4, etc, so that any desired proportions of the respective gases may be delivered to the.

mixing chamber h". n

As hereinbefore stated, it is desirable that the gases to be mixed be supplied to the regulating valve and" the mixing chamber at substantlally the same pressures and, ,to this end, the apparatus. is associated with a pressure re' ulatin device, which ma conveniently taEe the orm illustrated in ig. 4, comprisripheral series of wall ports communicating ing two tank sections 0 and p connected'at their bottoms and adapted to receive a body of liquid, such as water, which rises to the level of the gauge cocks g and g, respectively, the upper portions of the tanks being con nected by pipes or conduits a and b to the inlet ports a and 6, respectively,of the valve casing 0, The upper portions of the tank sections are also provided with pressure gauges z, 2' to indicate the pressure of the gases in the respective tank sections. The inlets to the respective tank sections are in the form of dip pipes r and s, the lower ends of which are submerged in the liquid in the respective tank sections to such depthsas will insure the pressures of the gases in the upper portions of the tanks being equal and, in order to accurately balance such pressures,

at least one of the inlet pipes 1" or s is per pendicularly adjustable in the tank, soas to regulate the relativedepths ofimmersion of the pipe ends.

While the valve mechanism has been inns-- trated in its preferred form as involving a single valve body or plug, it will be apparcut that a single plug may be substituted by two plugs, one to control each series of circumferential ports and each provided with a separate stem and operating head, so that they may be separately actuated to control the relative proportion of the gases delivered to the mixing chamber.

What- I claim is: v

.1. mixing device for gases, comprising a valve casing having inlet and discharge ducts for the respective gases and two peripheral series of wall ports communicating with the respective discharge ducts, and a valve in said casing adapted to uncover the ports of one series successively and simultaneously close a like number of ports in the other series.

' 2. A mixing device for gases as described in claim 1 in which the casing has a cylindrical boreand the valve is a cylindrical plug fitting the bore having semi-cylindrical end sections on opposite sides adapted to be moved into and out of registry with the re spective series of ports.

3, A mixing device for gases, comprising a valve casing having'inlet and discharge ducts. for the respective gases and two peripheral series of wall ports communicating with the respective discharge ducts, a valve in said casing adapted to uncover the ports of one series successively and simultaneously close a like number of ports in the other series, and a mixing chamber into which the discharge ducts open.

4. A mixing device for gases, a. valve casing having inlet and discharge ducts for the respective gases and two pe-' with the respective discharge ducts, a. valve in said casing adapted touncover the ports comprising

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2541732 *Mar 3, 1947Feb 13, 1951Wilhelm Fred CarlApparatus for controlling the hardness of water
US2650612 *Dec 22, 1948Sep 1, 1953Vernon Brumbaugh IsaacGraduated universal valve for gas appliances
US3053277 *Apr 14, 1958Sep 11, 1962American Radiator & StandardRotary mixing valve
US3119413 *Oct 26, 1961Jan 28, 1964Rabinow Engineering Co IncFluid timing valve
US3182677 *Oct 5, 1962May 11, 1965Gilbert & Barker Mfg CoMixing valve
US3604631 *Jan 12, 1970Sep 14, 1971Berwyn E EtterWelding and cutting torch
US3865139 *Aug 24, 1973Feb 11, 1975Price Pfister Brass MfgAppliance shutoff valve
US4011890 *Nov 4, 1975Mar 15, 1977Sjumek, Sjukvardsmekanik HbGas mixing valve
US5477884 *Jan 28, 1994Dec 26, 1995Pure CorporationMixing valve for an aircraft cleaning apparatus
US5611462 *Feb 22, 1995Mar 18, 1997Pure CorporationAircraft cleaning apparatus and mixing valve therefor
Classifications
U.S. Classification48/180.1, 251/252, 137/625.41, 137/625.19, 137/556, 137/607
International ClassificationF23D14/60
Cooperative ClassificationF23D14/60
European ClassificationF23D14/60