Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS18985 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 29, 1857
Publication numberUS 18985 A, US 18985A, US-A-18985, US18985 A, US18985A
InventorsFranklin Olds
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Island
US 18985 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

F. OLDS Grinding Mill.

Patented Dec. 29, 1857.

N. PETERS Plwwulho n hen Washington. 0. c.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

FRANKLIN OLDS, OF PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND.

GRINDING-MILL.

Specification of Letters Patent No. 18,985, dated December 29, 1857.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, FRANKLIN OLDS, of Providence, in the county of Providence and State of Rhode Island, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Grinding-Mills; and I do hereby declare that the following is a full, clear, and exact description of the same, reference being had to the annexed drawings, making a part of this specification, in which- Figure 1 is a vertical section of my improvement. Fig. 2 is a section showing the means employed for securing the screw rods or preventing them from turning.

This invention consists of a new article of manufacture, viz. a grinding mill, made substantially as hereinafter described.

To enable those skilled in the art to fully understand and construct my invention, I will proceed to describe it.

A represents a cast iron curb or casing of cylindrical form and supported by a framing B arranged in any proper manner. The curb or casing A is formed of two parts (a), (6), connected together by screw bolts (0), which pass through ears or vertical tubular projections at the outer side of the curb.

To the center of the base C of the framing B, a nut D is attached, and a screw E is fitted in said nut. The screw E has a hand wheel F on its upper part, and a step Gr rests upon the upper end of the screw. The step G is of cylindrical form and is fitted in a socket H, which is at the upper part of a bowshaped support I attached to the base. The step G is allowed to work up and down in the socket H, but is prevented from turning therein by a screw (0), the end of which fits in a vertical groove in the step. The upper end of the step also has a shoulder (f) formed on it to prevent its descending below a certain distance within the socket.

J represents a spindle, the lower end of which is fitted in the step G. This spindle passes up through the center of the curb A and projects a short distance above its upper surface.

K represents the lower stone or runner which is attached to the spindle J. The stone K is placed in the lower part (b) of the curb.

L is the upper or stationary stone which i is secured within the upper part (a) of the curb. The stone L, has an iron band (g) around its upper end, and projecting bars (h) are attached to said band. Through the projecting bars (it) screw rods pass, the rods passing through the top plate of the curb A. The upper ends of the screw rods (2') have squares formed on them to receive a wrench, and a flanch (j) is also formed on each rod just below the square. The upper surfaces of the fianches (j) are of conical form, and a plate (7a) is fitted over each fianch, said plates having a screw bolt (Z) passing through each end and into the top of the curb A. The plates (is) are employed to prevent the casual turning of the screw rods which is effected by screwing the plates (is) down so that they will bear with a requisite degree of pressure on the conical flanches (j), see more particularly Fig. 2. Four screw rods may be employed.

The upper end of the spindle J has a square (m) formed on it, and a sleeve is fitted on said square. The lower end of a square shaft (0) is fitted within the upper part of the sleeve (7), and the upper end of the shaft (0) is fitted within a sleeve (p) which is also fitted on the lower end of a vertical shaft M which is fitted in a proper framing. The sleeve is retained on the ends of the two shafts M, (0) by a pin (g) which passes transversely through the shaft (0). The shaft M is the driving shaft, and a pulley N is placed thereon.

O is the hopper and P is a shoe placed below it, said shoe conducting the grain to the orifice through the center of the upper stone L. A damsel Q is placed on the upper part of the spindle J, said damsel giving the shake motion to the shoe.

From the above description of parts it will be seen that the spindle J will not be subjected to any lateral pressure and consequently much friction is avoided thereby. In the usual mills the spindle is driven directly from shafting either by belts or gearing, and the spindle is consequently subjected to a lateral pressure and much friction is created in the bearings of the spindle. In my improvement, the power or driving shaft being connected to the spindle by means of the shaft (0) the rotary motion is communicated to the spindle but not the lateral pressure.

The parallelism of the two stones may be preserved with the greatest facility, the adjustment of the screw rods (i) being only required. This is an important feature of the invention for good work cannot be done unless the stones are parallel.

The lower stone may be raised and lowered so that the stones may grind finer or coarser by merely turning the hand Wheel F, and as the step G is raised and lowered in a vertical line, the stone K will be raised and lowered in a perfectly vertical position. In the usual or old mills the spindles Were stepped in bridge trees or levers which were raised and lowered at one end. By this means the spindles were thrown out of line at every adjustment of the stones. This difficulty has been partially obviated .by having the steps of the spindles set in swivels or universal joints but these devices are not generally used, on account of their complexity, and liability to get out of repair and the expense attending their construction.

herein set forth.

FRANKLIN OLDS. Witnesses: I

ALBERT R. BRIGGS, S. B. JoHNsoN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7291289Aug 20, 2004Nov 6, 2007Dowa Electronics Materials Co., Ltd.Phosphor and production method of the same and light source and LED using the phosphor
US7319195Nov 24, 2004Jan 15, 2008Dowa Electronics Materials Co., Ltd.Composite conductor, superconductive apparatus system, and composite conductor manufacturing method
US7345418Nov 10, 2004Mar 18, 2008Dowa Mining Co., Ltd.Phosphor mixture and light emitting device using the same
US7432647Sep 2, 2004Oct 7, 2008Dowa Electronics Materials Co., Ltd.Light source having phosphor including divalent trivalent and tetravalent elements
US7434981 *May 26, 2005Oct 14, 2008Dowa Electronics Materials Co., Ltd.Manufacturing method of metal paste
US7443094Jun 10, 2005Oct 28, 2008Dowa Electronics Materials Co., Ltd.Phosphor and manufacturing method of the same, and light emitting device using the phosphor
US7445730Sep 6, 2005Nov 4, 2008Dowa Electronics Materials Co., Ltd.Phosphor and manufacturing method of the same, and light emitting device using the phosphor
US7476335Feb 23, 2005Jan 13, 2009Dowa Electronics Materials Co., Ltd.Phosphor and manufacturing method therefore, and light source using the phosphor
US7476336Jun 10, 2005Jan 13, 2009Dowa Electronics Materials Co., Ltd.Phosphor and manufacturing method for the same, and light emitting device using the phosphor
US7476337Jul 15, 2005Jan 13, 2009Dowa Electronics Materials Co., Ltd.Phosphor and manufacturing method for the same, and light source
US7476338Aug 26, 2005Jan 13, 2009Dowa Electronics Materials Co., Ltd.Phosphor and manufacturing method for the same, and light source
US7477009Aug 8, 2005Jan 13, 2009Dowa Electronics Materials Co., Ltd.Phosphor mixture and light emitting device
US7514860Feb 22, 2005Apr 7, 2009Dowa Electronics Materials Co., Ltd.Phosphor mixture and light emitting device
US7524437Mar 2, 2006Apr 28, 2009Dowa Electronics Materials Co., Ltd.Phosphor and manufacturing method of the same, and light emitting device using the phosphor
US7527748Aug 2, 2005May 5, 2009Dowa Electronics Materials Co., Ltd.Phosphor and phosphor film for electron beam excitation and color display apparatus using the same
US7803286Sep 28, 2010Dowa Electronics Materials Co., Ltd.Phosphor and manufacturing method for the same, and light source
US7884539Feb 8, 2011Dowa Electronics Materials Co., Ltd.Light source having phosphor including divalent, trivalent and tetravalent elements
US8066910Apr 19, 2010Nov 29, 2011Dowa Electronics Materials Co., Ltd.Phosphor and manufacturing method for the same, and light source
US8308981Nov 13, 2012Dowa Electronics Materials Co., Ltd.Phosphor and manufacturing method for the same, and light source
US8441180Jan 3, 2011May 14, 2013Dowa Electronics Materials Co., Ltd.Light source having phosphor including divalent, trivalent and tetravalent elements
US20050253500 *Aug 20, 2004Nov 17, 2005Dowa Mining Co., Ltd.Phosphor and production method of the same and light source and LED using the phosphor
US20050267243 *May 26, 2005Dec 1, 2005Dowa Mining Co., Ltd.Manufacturing method of metal paste
US20060006782 *Sep 2, 2004Jan 12, 2006Dowa Mining Co., Ltd.Phosphor, LED and light source
US20060043337 *Feb 23, 2005Mar 2, 2006Dowa Mining Co., Ltd.Phosphor and manufacturing method therefore, and light source using the phosphor
US20060045832 *Nov 10, 2004Mar 2, 2006Dowa Mining Co., Ltd.Phosphor mixture and light emitting device using the same
US20060065878 *Aug 26, 2005Mar 30, 2006Dowa Mining Co., Ltd.Phosphor and manufacturing method for the same, and light source
US20060091790 *Feb 22, 2005May 4, 2006Dowa Mining Co., Ltd.Phosphor mixture and light emitting device
US20060197432 *Aug 8, 2005Sep 7, 2006Dowa Mining Co., Ltd.Phosphor mixture and light emitting device
US20060197439 *Mar 2, 2006Sep 7, 2006Dowa Mining Co., Ltd.Phosphor and manufacturing method of the same, and light emitting device using the phosphor
US20060220047 *Sep 6, 2005Oct 5, 2006Dowa Mining Co., Ltd.Phosphor and manufacturing method of the same, and light emitting device using the phosphor
US20060220520 *Jun 10, 2005Oct 5, 2006Dowa Mining Co., Ltd.Phosphor and manufacturing method of the same, and light emitting device using the phosphor
US20060244356 *Jun 10, 2005Nov 2, 2006Dowa Mining Co., Ltd.Phosphor and manufacturing method for the same, and light emitting device using the phosphor
US20070029525 *Aug 2, 2005Feb 8, 2007Dowa Mining Co., Ltd.Phosphor and phosphor film for electron beam excitation and color display apparatus using the same
US20090085010 *Oct 1, 2008Apr 2, 2009Dowa Electronics Materials Co., Ltd.Phosphor and manufacturing method for the same, and light source
US20090109652 *Nov 28, 2008Apr 30, 2009Dowa Electronics Materials Co., Ltd.Phosphor and manufacturing method for the same, and light source
US20100301272 *Dec 2, 2010Dowa Electronics Materials Co., Ltd.Phosphor and manufacturing method for the same, and light source
US20110115366 *May 19, 2011Dowa Electronics Materials Co., Ltd.Light source having phosphor including divalent, trivalent and tetravalent elements
USRE44162 *Apr 23, 2013Dowa Electronics Materials Co., Ltd.Phosphor and phosphor film for electron beam excitation and color display apparatus using the same
USRE45502Mar 7, 2012May 5, 2015Dowa Electronics Materials Co., Ltd.Phosphor and manufacturing method therefore, and light source using the phosphor
USRE45640Mar 9, 2012Aug 4, 2015Dowa Electronics Materials Co., Ltd.Phosphor for electron beam excitation and color display device using the same
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB02C2/10