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Publication numberUS1898608 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 21, 1933
Filing dateJan 22, 1932
Priority dateDec 31, 1931
Publication numberUS 1898608 A, US 1898608A, US-A-1898608, US1898608 A, US1898608A
InventorsWilliam Alexander
Original AssigneeWilliam Alexander
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Centrifugal separator
US 1898608 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

,Patentecl Feb. 21, 1933 p ,saatos WILLIAM ALEXANDER, F GLASGOW, SCOTLAND CENTRIFUGAL SEPARATOR Application filed l'an'uary 22, 1932, Serial No. 588,144, and in Great Britain December 31, 1981.

The invention relates to centrifugal,separators in which gas, vapour or steam has a vortical or rotary motion, in a separating chamber and by the action of centrifugal force suspended impurities, whether liquid I orv solid, are thrown out to the sides of said chamber. F

More particularly the invention relates to separators of the type in which the gas discharge pipe is arranged substantially coaxial with the separating chamber and is disposed to lead the discharged gas away from the inlet end of said chamber.

in the following description the term gas is intended to include an gas, vapour or steam; and the term dust 1s intended to include any impurities to be removed from the gas;

In the centrifugal separator according to the invention, whether of down-flow or upflow type, the separating chamber is provided with a dust channel or channels extending along the side of the separating chamber and formed on the inner side, i. e., the side adj acent to the chamber, with perforations or with a longitudinal slot or slots through which dust passes from the separating chamher into the channel 'or channels.

The dust passing into the dust channel or channels falls to the lower part thereof, in-

stead of falling vertically from the separating chamber into a hopper or dust collecting vessel of comparatively large horizontal section situated below the separating chamber as heretofore.

The provision 0f a dustcharinelor channels,by enabling the usual rlust hopperto be dispensed with, in most cases results in a separator of smaller and cheaper construction than a separator 'with the usual hopper. Also, the internal surfaceof the channel or channels being vertical'or having a .steepthe inlet end.

slope, there is less deposit and buildin up of dust on suh surface than on the horlz'ontal or inclined surfa'ces'of a hopper, especially when the dust is of a sticky nature. Further, by the provision of an access opening at the top of the channel or eachfchann'el the internal surface may be more easily cleaned than the larger and less rea'dilyaccessible so that gas may flow with a circumferential internal surfaces of a hopper fitted with an inspection opening. In the drawing Fig. 1 is a vertical section andFig. 2 a part plan part horizontal section of a vaneless down-flow separator according to the invention.

Fig. 3 is a vertical section of the upper part of a vaned down-flow separator.

Fig. 4 is a vertical section and Fig. 5 a part plan part horizontal section of a vortical up-flow separator.

he separating chamber 1, shown in the drawing, is of substantially circular cross section. 2 denotes the gas supply pipe (or pipes) opening into an admisslon chamber 3 adjoining one end of, and having communication with, the separating chamber. 4 denotes a comparatively narrow dust channel extending along the side of the separating chamberp At the top of the dust channel 4 there is an accessopening adapted to be closed by a cover 5. At the lower end 6 the channel 4 converges to a narrower pipe form, 'a flange being provided for connection to a dust box or a dust pipe for leading the dust to any desired point. In the inner side of thedust channel 4 there are perforations or slots 7 for allowing the dust that is thrown out to the sides of the separating chamber 1 to pass into the dust channel where it gravitates to the channel outlet. A partition 8 partially isolates the admission chamber 3 from the separating chamber 1, and is encircled by a substantially annular passage 9,

component of velocity from the admission chamber 3 to the separating chamber 1. The inner end 11 of the gas discharge pipe 10 is coaxial or nearly coaxial with the separating chamber 1 and is situated at or near the opposite end of the separating chamber from The discharge pipe 10 does not extend through the core of the vortex and the gas flow in this pipe is in the direction away from the inlet end of the separating chamber. At or near the inner end of the discharge pipe is a flange 12 of straight, bent .or curved cross section. v

In the down-flow separator illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2 the gas entering the admission chamber 3 from the tangentially disposed supply pipe 2 has a circumferential component of velocity, so that the gas entering the separating chamber 3 has also such a velocity component. The annular assage 9 is shown as having no ide vanes, ut there may be provided inclined vanes extending across'this passage and serving to impart a circumferential component of motion to the gas, flowing into the separatin chamber. When such vanes are provided, t e' gas supply pipe 2 may be s tuated nearer to the centre line of the separating chamber than is shown in plan in Fig. 2, or the-gas supply pipe may lead into the top of the admission chamber, as-shown in Fig. 3. The partition 8 and the flange 12 may be dispensed with, if desired. An aperture or apertures 13 in the side of thedischarge pipe will allow any smallpercentage of dustthat may descend into the chamber 14 to pass immediately into the as discharge pipe.

T e lower part of the vaned down-flow separator illustrated in Fig. 3 is of the same construction as the vaneless form shown in Fig. 1.

Referring to Figs. 4 and 5, the annular passage 9 of the up-flow separator is divided by inclined guide vanes which cause the gas to enter the separating chamber with the necessary circumferential component of flow.

The action of the separators will be readil understood. The gas flows with a whirl through the annular passage 9 into the separating chamber 1 and leaves at or near the opposite end of the chamber by the axial pipe 10' to which the flow converges.

' Throughout the, unobstructed separating chamber 1 the motion, of the gas is of true vortical stream-line nature, and free from eddies. Suspended dust carried to the outside of the vortex and entrained by the gas is expelled through the apertures 7 into the dust channel 5 and falls to the lower end of the channel whence itis easily removed.

In the down-flow separators of Figs. 1, 2 and 3, any small percentage of dust that falls past the apertures 7 into the chamber 14 aaeaeos discharging all the gas admitted to the separator, at least one external dust channel located alongside and extending the entire vertical length of said separating chamber, said channel extending over only a ,part of the circumference of said separating chamber,

said channel communicating with said separating chamber by at least one small di-. mensioned aperture in the side of said channel, said aperture permitting passage of dust expelled from said separating chamber by centrifugal force, said channel having no gas-current therethrough, and having no direct gaseous communication with said first mentioned pipe, said channel having a dust outlet at its lower end spaced in a direction parallel to the axis of the vortex and away from said aperture.

2. /A centrifugal dust separator as claimed in claim 1 in which the annular gas passage is fitted with inclined vanes.

3. A centrifugal dust separator as claimed in claim 1 having at least one tangentially disposed gas supply passage.

4. A centrifugal dust separator as claimed in claim 1 in which the gas discharge pipe is provided with at least one aperture in its side for the escape of dust from the lowerv end of the separating chamber.

In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification. V P

WM. ALEXANDER.

cannot build up in this chamber 14 but is I entrained with thegas which passes'from the chamber 14 through the apertures 13 to the interior of the gas discharge pipe.

What is claimed is 1. A centrifugal dust separator comprising an upright cylindrical casing including a gas admission chamber, a pipe supplying gas to said admission chamber, a vortical separating chamber coaxial with said admissionchamber, a gas discharge pipe coaxial with both said chambers and projecting into said separating chamber, a partition partially isolating said separating chamber and affording an annular gas passage leading from said admission chamber to said separating chamber whereby there is set up in the gas enter-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2425588 *Jun 22, 1945Aug 12, 1947Alexander WilliamVortex dust separator
US2796949 *Dec 27, 1954Jun 25, 1957Gen ElectricVortex steam separator
US2864463 *Jul 29, 1955Dec 16, 1958Centrifix CorpInternal purifier
US2929465 *Jul 21, 1958Mar 22, 1960Centrifix CorpInternal purifier
US3713279 *Jun 17, 1970Jan 30, 1973Moore LGas-liquid separator
US4138858 *Jun 9, 1977Feb 13, 1979Masahiko IzumiCold storage apparatus
US6197080 *Feb 19, 1999Mar 6, 2001TRüTZSCHLER GMBH & CO. KGApparatus for separating fiber material from an air stream
US6874197 *Jul 26, 2000Apr 5, 2005G.B.D CorpApparatus and method for separating particles from a cyclonic fluid flow
US7588616Oct 10, 2008Sep 15, 2009Gbd Corp.Vacuum cleaner with a plate and an openable dirt collection chamber
US7776120Mar 8, 2007Aug 17, 2010G.B.D. Corp.Vacuum cleaner with a moveable divider plate
US9027198Feb 27, 2013May 12, 2015G.B.D. Corp.Surface cleaning apparatus
US9161669Mar 1, 2013Oct 20, 2015Omachron Intellectual Property Inc.Surface cleaning apparatus
US9204773Mar 1, 2013Dec 8, 2015Omachron Intellectual Property Inc.Surface cleaning apparatus
US9227151Feb 28, 2013Jan 5, 2016Omachron Intellectual Property Inc.Cyclone such as for use in a surface cleaning apparatus
US9227201Feb 28, 2013Jan 5, 2016Omachron Intellectual Property Inc.Cyclone such as for use in a surface cleaning apparatus
US9238235Feb 28, 2013Jan 19, 2016Omachron Intellectual Property Inc.Cyclone such as for use in a surface cleaning apparatus
US9295995Feb 28, 2013Mar 29, 2016Omachron Intellectual Property Inc.Cyclone such as for use in a surface cleaning apparatus
US9314139Jul 18, 2014Apr 19, 2016Omachron Intellectual Property Inc.Portable surface cleaning apparatus
US9320401Feb 27, 2013Apr 26, 2016Omachron Intellectual Property Inc.Surface cleaning apparatus
US20070209335 *Mar 8, 2007Sep 13, 2007Gbd Corp.Vacuum cleaner with a moveable divider plate
US20090025176 *Oct 10, 2008Jan 29, 2009Gbd Corp.Vacuum cleaner with a plate and an openable dirt collection chamber
Classifications
U.S. Classification55/452, 55/463, 55/459.1
International ClassificationB04C3/00
Cooperative ClassificationB04C3/00
European ClassificationB04C3/00