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Publication numberUS1899438 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 28, 1933
Filing dateDec 30, 1927
Priority dateDec 30, 1927
Publication numberUS 1899438 A, US 1899438A, US-A-1899438, US1899438 A, US1899438A
InventorsGrant Alexander M
Original AssigneeGrant Alexander M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Well drilling apparatus
US 1899438 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 28, 1933.`

. A TTORNEY Illia.

Feb. 28, 1933.

3 A. M. GRANT WELL DRILLING APPARATUS Filed Dec. 30 1927 3 Sheets-Sheet INVENTOR. Lamaze M 629m ATTORNEY so, 1927 3 sheets-smet 3 INVENToR. ALM/m51@ .0f Yea/V7' EwMmmWamlMg-Wm@SUNW IIII. .144414 IIIIIIIA um (Illlllllllll ATTURNEYS.

A. M. GRANT WELL DRILLING APPARATUS Filed Dec.

Peb. 28, 1933.

-Patented Feb. 28, 1933' UNITED STATES ALEXANDER H. GRANT, F SAN DIEGG, CALIFORNIA.

WELL DRILLING APPARATUS .Application led December'30, 1927. Serial No. 243,572;

My invention relates to well drilling apparatuses and the objects of my invention are: first, to provide a device of this class which is combined into one complete unit adapted to fit within a well hole and which is provided with operating means relatively close to the drilling tool; second, to provide a device of this class which may be used to drill deep wells through all kinds of strata such as aggregrate boulders, solid rock, sand,

clay or the like, with the same surface equipment, thus eliminating the necessity of dual equipment for operating two different types of drilling apparatuses; third, to provide'a device of this class which has the advantages of both the reciprocating and -the rotary drilling apparatuses; fourth, to provide a device of this class which eliminates the need of shafts or other mechanical power transmitting apparatuses connecting the' drilling tool with a source of power at the mouth of i the well; fifth, to provide a device of this class which eliminates the energy consumed shafts or the like driven from the mouth of the well; sixth, to provide a device of this class which is supported and controlled by means of iexible cables which may be easily stored on suitable. drums thereby conserving space; seventh, to provide a device of this class which eliminates the necessity of joining or disjoining the shafts when entering or removing the drill; eighth, to provide a device of this class which` reduces the time necessary for entering or removing the drilling tool; ninth, to provide a drilling tool of this class which receives a reciprocal movement from an electric motor and which receives a rotary movement from a fiuid motor, such reciprocal and' rotar movements occurring simultaneously; tent toprovide a drilling apparatus of the class described in which electricity is used to provide a reciprocal movement of the tool and fluid is used to ro- .tate said tool and conduct the drilled material out 'of the well; eleventh, to provide a drilling apparatus of this class in which several percussion hammers may be easily interchanged so as to provide either heavy, slow blows or light, quick blows depending '50 upon the hardness of the strata. through 4particularly set forth in the appended claims,

reference being had to the accompanying drawings and to the characters of reference thereon which form apart of this application, in which;

Figures 1, 2, and 3 are longitudinal sectional views of the upper, centra-l, and lower portions,respectively, of my Well drilling apparatus with parts and portions shown in elevation to facilitate the illustration; Fig. 4 is a substantially diagrammatical view of my well drilling apparatus showing the relationship of the various portions thereof; Fig. 5 is a.

fragmentary, longitudinal sectional view g5 through 5--5 of Fig. 6; Fig. 6 is a top or plan View of my well drilling apparatus from 6-6 of Fig. 1 with tubing shown in section; Fi

7 is a transverse sectlonal view through 7- of Fig. 1; Fig. 8 is a transverse sectional view so through 8-8 of Fig. 2; Fig. 9 is a transverse sectional view through 9-9 of Fig. 2 with arts and portions shown in elevation to acilitate the illustration; Fig. 10 is a developed viewfof the cam means for operating 85 the percussion hammer showing the relative position of the rollers therewith; Fig. 11 is a transverse sectional view through 11-11 of Fig. 2; Fig. 12 is a transverse sectional view through 12--12 of Fi 2; Fig. 13 is a trans- 90 verse sectional view t rough 1 3-13 of Fig. 3; Fig. 14 is -a transverse sectional view v through 14-14 of Fig..3; Fig. 15 is a transverse sectional view through 15-15 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 16 is an elevational view of one of the mi` fluid motor rotor segments; Fig. 17 is a frag-` mentar elevational view of the fluid motor` stator; ig. 18 is a bottomview of my drilling apparatus; Fig. 19 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the drilling bit from 19-19 1go" of Fi 18; Figs. 20,21, 22, and 2,3 illustrate a modi cation of the hammer mechanism of my well drilling apparatus of which Fig. 20 is a fragmentary longitudinal sectional view of the modified hammer mechanism of my well drilling apparatus with parts and portions in elevation to facilitate the illustration; Fig. 21 is a transverse sectional view thereof through 2l-21 of Fig. 2O with parts and portions shown in elevation to facilitate the illustration; Fig. 22 is a fragmentary sectional view of my modification through the cam means thereof, and Fig. 23 is a developed view of the cam means showing the position of the rollers in relation therewith.

Similar characters of reference refer to similar parts and portions throughout the several views of the drawings.

Casing l, casing plug 2, electric cable packing gland 3, bail 4, centering means 5, fluid conductors 6, motor 7, gear housings 8 and 9, bearing 10, shaft 11, spring 12, cam roller support 13, spring 14, cam rollers 15, hammer bushing 16, hammer 17, drill head member 18, drill shank 19, spring 20, bushing 21, casing 22, stuliing gland 23, flexible sleeves 24,

spring 25, spring support 26, bushings 27 and lining wells. The upper portion of my well drilling apparatus is housed in a casing 1 which is threaded at its upper end portion for receiving a casing plug 2.

The casing plug 2 is provided with a longitudinally extending passage 2a therethrough, through which extends an electric cable C. The upper portion of the passage 2a is en larged for receiving tl electric cable packing gland 3, as shown best in Figs. 5 and 6 of the drawings. Mounted across the upper portion of the casing plug 2 is a bail 4 to which is se- 1 cured a suitable cable, not shown, for raising and lowering the drilling apparatus. A plurality of centering and friction means` 5 are provided which consist of strips of metal se cured in spaced relation around the upper portion of the casing plug 2, and are provided with extended curved portions 5a which press against the side walls of the tubing T, or the earth walls of an unlined well hole, and tend to center the drilling apparatus and prevent its rotating relative thereto.

A second passage 2b extends into the casing plug 2 from the upper side thereof and receives the one end of a flexible pipe P which extends to the mouth of the well. Other passages 20 extend from opposite sides of the y each fluid conductor 6 extends above the terminals of the passages 2c in the plug 2.

. Mounted within the casing 1 below the plug 2 is an electric motor 7, which may be of any style or design having a relatively small diameter and sufficient power. The motor shaft 7a extends into a gear housing 8 and is provided with a gear 8a.

The gear housing 8 is cylindrical in cross section, closed at the one end thereof, secured to the casing 1 and provided With internal gear teeth. A traveling gear support 8b is provided upon which is mounted traveling gears 8c, which extend between the internal gear teeth of the housing 8 and the central gear 8a. A center shaft 8d extends downwardly through a centered and bushed hole in the closed end of the gear housing 8, as shown best in Fig. 1 of the drawings. The shaft 8d extends into a second gear housing 9 and is provided with a gear 9a.

The gear housing 9 is secured to the casing 1, is similar to the. gear housing 8 and is provided with a rotary gear support 9b on which is mounted gears 9c which extend between the gear 9a and the internal gear teeth on the inner surface of the housing 9. The rotary gear support 9b rests on a bearing 10. A shaft 11 is provided which is secured to the gear support 9b and which extends through a centered and bushed opening in the gear housing 9. A spring 12 encircles the shaft 11 and rests with the one edge thereof against the bushed portion of the housing 9 and the other end against the hammer bushing 16. s

Mounted at the lower end of the shaft 11 is a cam roller support 13. The roller support 13 is normally held against a collar 11a at the lower portion of the shaft 11 by means of a spring 14 which extends to another collar 11b. Mounted on bosses which extend from opposite sides of the cam roller support 13 is a pair of tapered cam rollers 15 which are adapted t'o roll on a double cam 16a which constitutes the lower extremity of the hammer bush-ing 16. The cam 16a passes from its minimum to its maximum in half a circumvolution, as shown in Figs. 2, 9 and in the developed view 10.

It will be noted that the depth of the cam is greater than the normal movement of the hammer, as shown by the dotted lines in Fig. 10 of the drawings. After reaching its maxiward movement before striking the rollers.

As the rollers turn they engage the incline of the cam at an angle thus reducing the pounding on the rollers to a minimum.

The hammer plug 16 serves as a plug for closing the chamber 17a in which the rollers .travel and a bushing for the shaft 11. An

oiling means 166 is mounted on the u per portion of the hammer bushing 16 whic 1ubricates the side walls of the casing 1, the shaft 11 and cam 16a, as shown in Fig. 2 of the drawings. The chamber 17a, which houses the "cam and roller mechanism is formed in the upper portion of the hammer 17 The one side of the hammer 17 is provided with a longitudinally extending groove l 176 into which extends a key 1a which is secured to and extends from the side wall of the casing 1, as shown best in Fig. 2 of the drawings.

. Spaced a short distance below the hammer 17 is a head member 18 of the percussive drilling mechanism. The head member 18 is limited in its upper movement by an internal annular collar 16 secured to the casing 1. .A longitudinally extending groove 18a is provided in the one side of the head member 18 into which extends a key 1c which is secured to and extends fromthe side walls of the casing 1. The keys 1a and 1c prevent all but a reciprocal movement of the hammer 17 and the head member 18 relative to the casing 1.

Secured into the head member 18 is a drill shank 19. A spring 20 is' provided which extends between the `under side of the head member 18 and a bushing 21. The bushing 21 centers shank 19 relative to the casings and removably connects the lower extremit of the casin 1 with the upper extremity o another casmg 22 thereby facilitating the dismantling or repairing of the drilling apparatus.

A stufling gland 23 is provided whichl is ad- ]'ustably secured to the lower portion of the bushing 21. The stufling gland 23 is provided with an extended annular portion 23a to which is secured by means of a clamp 24a a flexible .sleeve 24. The sleeve 24 extends along the shank 19 forming a fluidtight oint therewith and its extended end is rigidly secued relative thereto by means of a clamp 24 Immediately below the -sleeve 24 is a collar 19e which is secured to the shank 19. A spring 25 extends between the collar 19e and a spring support 26. The support 26 is cylindrical and provided with an internal annular ridge 26a which fits snugly around the longitudinal shank 19. Slots 266 are provided which bisect the cylindrical portion of the spring support 26 below the flange 26a, as shown in Figs. 3 and 13 of the drawings. Holes 22a are provided which extend through the walls of the casing 22 into the ichamber provided between the spring support 26 and the shank 19.

The yfluid conductors 6 terminate just below the holes 22a. Thusa fluid passage is provided which extends from lthe fluid pipe P into the fluid conductors and then into -the chamber just described. n,

The shank 19 is provided with a diametrically extending passage 19a which intersects a centered longitudinal passa-ge -196 within'.

the shank 19. Immediately below the hole 19a is another flexible sleeve 24. The lower extremity of the sleeve 24 is secured to an extended portion 27a of the bushing 27. Said bushing 2l is removably secured to the lower portion of the casing 22. Secured in spaced relation to the periphery of the casing 22 below the fluid conductor 6 is a plurality of centering means 5 which are provided with furved extended lower portions 5a which tend to center the casing 22 and prevent the casing from rotating. Thus the two sets of centering means 5 center the drilling apparatus relative to the tubing T, or the sides of anunlined well. A second extended portion 276 extends downwardly from the bushing 27 along the shank 19 and receives the one end of the flexible sleeve 24, the other end of which is secured to the shank 19.

The shank 1'9 is provided with several sets of annular grooves 19d corresponding to each extended portion of the several flexible sleeves 24. The clamps 246 thereof press portions of the sleeves 24 into the grooves 19d thereby preventing the slipping of the extended ends of the several sleeves 24 relative to the shank 19 and preventing the leakage of fluid therebetween.

A bushing 28 is provided which is removably secured to a casing 29 whichhas a substantially smaller diameter than the inner diameter of the tubingT, or the hole to be drilled. Mounted on the inner central portion ofthe casing 29 are a pair of fluid motor rotor segments 30, as shown in Figs. 3, 15 and 16 of the drawings. Each rotor segment is provided with a plurality of helically extending ridges 30a.

Secured to the lower extremity of the shank 19 is a fluid motor stator. A diametricallyextending passage 190 is provided in the shank 19 which intersects the lower extremity I0f the passage 196 and communicates with a chamber 316 formed by the upper portions of the stator 31 and the rotor segments 30. The

shown best in Figs. 3, 15 and 17 of the ldrawings. The lower portion ofthe stator 31 isl reduced and extends within'a drill chuck 32 which is revoluble relative thereto'. The drill chuck 32 is secured to the casing 29 and rotates therewith. Thus when a fluid, such as water or the like, passes out through the passage it is directed by the longitudinally extended ridges 31a against the helically extending ridges 30a, causing the chuck to rotate.

A chamber 306 is formed by the upper extremity of the drill chuck 32 and thelower portions of the rotor segments 30. The drill chuck 32 is provided with a plurality of spaced apart longitudinally extending passages 32a which communicate with the chamber 30?) and extend to the lower extremity of the drill chuck. The lower extremity of the drill chuck is provided with a plurality of slots 326 which are tapered at the one side thereof, as shown best in Figs. 3 and 19 of the drawings. Each slot 32?) extends towards the outer periphery of the drill chuck 32 so that only the one untapered side is coincident with the center line of the drill chuck, as

shown best in Fig. 18 of the drawings.

Drills 33 are provided which dovetail with the slots 325 and are held against lateral movement by screws 33?). Said drills 33 are beveled at their extended portions 33a forming sharp ridges for drilllng out the bottom of the well hole which extend radially across the base of the drill chuck.

A countersunk hole is formed by the intersection of the several drills 33 through which extends a bolt 32o which is secured to the drill chuck 32 and which holds the central portions of the drills from springing, as shownbest in Figs. 3, 18 and 19 of the drawings. The bolt 320 is provided with a chisel shaped end portion which cuts the central part of the well hole not covered by the drills.

The alternative hammer structure, shown in Figs. 20, 21, 22, and 23, may be interchanged with the hammer structure in the apparatus just described. The alternative hammer structure is intended for use when relatively light rapid blows are needed. This is especially desirable for the softer strata through which the drill passes, while the structure previously described is more suited for the harder strata.

In the alternative structure, gears 34, and 35, shown fragmentarily, which have a different gear ratio are substituted in place of the gears 9a and 9c. A traveling gear support 36 which replaces the support 9b, rests upon the bearing 10 and is secured to the shaft 37, which replaces the shaft 11. The shaft 11, hammer,'and remaining hammer actuating means of the first described hammer 'structure is replaced by the alternative hammer and actuating means.

The shaft 37 extends downwardly through the bushed opening in the lower portion of the gear housing 9. A thrust bearing 38 rests with its one side against the shoulder of the shaft 37 and theuother side rests against the bushing in the lower portion of the gear housing 9,- as shown in Fig. 20 of the drawings. The lower portion of the shaft 37 is reduced and provided with a pair of spaced apart collars 39. Resiliently supported by means of springs 40 between the collars 39 is a roller support 41 which is rovided with a pair of diametrically extending bosses upon which` is rotatably mounted rollers 42. A cam member 43 is provided which consists of two spaced apart cylindrical shells having a pair of coinciding cam surfaces 43a and 431) which forms a slot of constant width having a pair of maximum points and a pair of minimum points to each circumvolution as shown best in Fig. 22 and the developed view 23 of the drawings.

The rollers 42 may move freely yet impart a positive action at all times to the cam 43. The cam means 43 and roller mechanism are mounted within an opening in the upper p0rtion of the hammer 45 which is closed by a bushing 44, there being provided plenty of room for the movement of the hammer 45 relative to its actuating mechanism. The springs 40 permit the continual rotation of the -rollers 42 whether or not the hammer makes a stroke equal in\l\ength to the height of the cam.I Thus when the drill is in hard strata the hammer 45 normally moves a shorter distance than the height of the cam causing the upper spring 40 to contract and permitting the rollers 42 to pass over the high points of the cam 41. When the drill is not resting on the bottom of the well the hammer 45 makes a slightly longer stroke than the cam permits and the additional length is taken up in the contraction of the lower spring 40.

The operation of my well drilling app-aratus is as follows:

The whole apparatus is lowered by means of.a cable attached to the bail 4 until the drills 33 touch the bottom of 'a well. The centering means v5 press against the tubing T or walls of the hole and center the a paratus relative thereto. The flexible pipe F is connected with the source of"water supply having suitable pressure and the electric cable 3 is connected to the source of electrical power. The electric motor 7 is controlled by suitable means at the m'outh of the well and turns the shaft 11 by means of the gear trains mounted in the housings 8 and 9. The shaft 11 rotates the `cam rollers 15 which are in Contact with the cam 16a thus imparting a reciprocating action to the hammer 17.

It will be noted in the first described structure that the motor simply raises the hammer against the action of the spring 12 and the weight of the hammer 17. Thus the force of the hammer is due to the spring 12 and to its own inertia. lVhen the drill portions are resting on the bottom of the Well the hammer 17 strikes the head 18 of the percussion mechanism of the drilling apparatus which includes the head 18, the shank 19, and the mechanism secured to the lower end thereof, as shown best in Figs. 2, 3, and 4 of the drawings. When theydrills 33 of the percussive mechanism are resting upon the bottom of the well, the percussive mechanism moves only a short distance with each blow of the hammer. Thus the springs 20 and 25 do not offer a great resistanceto the action of the hammer 17. The strength and tendency of the springs 20 and 25 is such that they overbalance the dead weight of the percussive mechanism and return it each time to the stop 1b to receive the blow from the hammer 17. Should the drills 33 be oli' the bottom of the well, the springs 20 and 25 absorb the force of the hammer 17 and prevent any damage to the apparatus.

The lower portion of t-he percussive apparatus is provided with a rudimentary hydraulic motor which is driven b water which comes down the flexible pipe I; through the passages 2b and 2c into the fluid conductor Y6 then through the hole 22a and passage 19a intothe passa e 196 then out through the passage 190 an into the chamber 316. The water is directedb means of the ridges 31a against the helica ly extending ridges 30a causing the rotors 30, casing 29, drill shank 32, drills 33, and drill end 32e to rotate slightly with each stroke of the hammer. It will be noted that it is not necessary nor especially desirable to produce a rapid rotation of the drill. Thus the force produced by the impingement of the water lagainst the rotors is s uificient. After leaving the hydraulic motor, the water passes through the passages 32a and out between the drills 33, then back and upward in the space between the tubing and the drilling. apparatus as shown in the several cross sectional views such as Fig. 6 through 9' and 11 through 14, the water after leaving the drill apparatus carries along with it the ground upparticles of matter which the drills have made to the top of the well.

It will be noted that the drilling mechanism may have a certain lexibilityrelative to the actuating mechanism, hence the drills will tend to undercut the tubing.

It will also be noted that the above described well drilling appavatus will Work equally as well inan unlin d well hole.

' Though I have shown and described acparticular construction, combination and arrangement of parts and portions I do not wish to be limited to this particular construction, combination and arrangement but desire to. include in the scope of my invention the construction, combination and arrangement substantially as set forth in the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In a well drilling apparatus of the class described, an electric motor, cam rollers operatively connected therewith, cam means associated with said cam rollers, a hammer means associated with .said cam means, a

percussive drilling means positioned with 2. In a well drilling apparatus of the class described, a casing, an electricsmotor, and -a hammer means positioned therein, cam rollers operativelyconnected with said electric motor, a cam associated with said cam rollers and secured to said hammer means for moving said hammer relative to said casing, a percussive drill means, the one end thereof mounted within the said casing for receiving impacts from said hammer means and a hydraulic motor mounted within said percussive drill for imparting a rotary motion thereto.

3. In a well drilling apparatus of the class described, a casing, an electric motor, and a hammer means positioned therein cam rollers operatively co nected with said elec'- tric motor, a cam ass iated with said cam rollers and secured to said hammer means for moving said hammer relative to said casing, a percussive drill means, the one end thereof mounted within the said casing for receiving impacts fromsaid hammer means, a hydraulic motor mounted Awithin said percussive drill for imparting a rotary motion thereto, fluid conductors mounted on the sides of said'casing and passages communicating between the said fluid conductors and said hydraulic motor.

4. In a well drilling apparatus of the class described, a casing', an electric motor, and a hammer means positioned therein, cam rollers operatively connected with said electric motor, a cam associated with said cam rollers and secured to said hammer for moving said hammer relative to said casing, a

percussive drill means, the one'end thereof mounted within the said casing for receiving impacts from said hammer, a hydraulic motor mounted within said percussive drill for imparting a rotary motion thereto, fluidV conductors mounted on the sides of said casing, assages communicating between the said iiiid conductors and said hydraulic motor and means for centering said casing relative to a conventional well.

5. In a drilling apparatus of the class dei 6. In a drilling apparatus of the class described, a casing, an electric motor and hamof said shank, ridges on said stator for directing the fluid against said helical ridges on said rotor. j,

7. In a drilling apparatus of the class described, a casing, a plug sealingy the one end thereof, provided w1th a passage therein for an electric cable, means for sealing said passa e, other passages communicating between a uid supply pipe and the opposite side walls of isaid plug, semi-cylindrical fluid conductors secured to opposite 'sides of said casing, an; electric motor secured within said casing adjacentto said plug, gear trains mounted mlfgear housings for operatively connecting cam rollers with said motor, cam means associated with said cam rollers, a hammer means provided with an impacting surface and associated with said cam means for moving said hammer means relative to said casing, and a percussive drilling means mounted adjacent to said hammer means for receiving impacts therefrom.

8. In a drilling apparatus of the class described, a casing, a plug sealing the one end thereof, provided with a passage therein for an electric cable, means for sealing said passage, other passages communicating between a fluid supply pipe and the opposite side walls of said plug, semi-cylindrical fluid conductors secured to opposite sides of said casing, an electric motor secured within said casing adjacent to said plug, gear trains mounted in gear housings for operatively connecting cam rollers with said motor, cam means associated with said camA rollers, a hammer means provided with an impacting surface and associated with said cam means for moving said hammer means relative to said casing, a percussive drilling means, the one portion thereof centered relative to said casing by means of bushings and s ring means for counteracting the weight o said drilling means and positioning said drilling means adjacent to said hammer means.

9. In a drilling apparatus of the class described, a casing, a plug sealing the one end thereof, provided with a passage for an electric cable, means for sealing said passage, other passages communicating between a fluid supply pipe and the opposite side walls of said plug, semi-cylindrical fluid conductors secured to opposite sides of said casing, an electric motor secured within said casing adjacent to said plug, cam rollers operatively connected with said electric motor, a hammer means, a cam associated with said cam rollers and secured to said hammer means for reciprocating said hammer means relative to said casing, a 'percussively operated drilling means positioned adjacent to said hammer means and including a shank, a drill chuck connected therewith and drills secured to the lower ortion of said drill chuck.

10. In a dr1lling apparatus of the class described, a casing, a plug sealing the 'one end thereof, provided with a passage for an electric cable, means for sealing said passage and other passages communicating between a fluid supply pipe and the oppositeside walls of said plug, semi-cylindrlcal fluid conductors secured to opposite sides of said casing,

an electric motor secured within saidl casing adjacent to said plug, cam rollers operatively connected with said electric motor, a hammer means, a cam associated with sald cam rollers -and secured to said hammer means for reciprocating said hammer means relative to sald casing, a percussively operated dr1ll1ng means positioned adjacent to said hammer end of said shank, ridges on the said stator for directing fluid against said helical ridges on said rotor, said shank of said drilllng means providedwith passages therein com- `municating between said semi-cylindrical fluid conductor andsaid hydraulic motor.

11. In a well drilling apparatus of the class described, a rotating and downwardly moving well drill, hydraulic means for rotating said drill, and means for impactmg said drill and driving itdownwardly.

12. In a well drilling a paratus of the class described, a rotating an downwardly moving well drill, hydraulic means for rotating said drill, and means within the well for im pacting said drill and driving it downwardly. 13. In a well drilling apparatus of the class described, a rotating and downwardly moving well drill, hydraulic means within the well for rotating said drill, and means for impacting said drill and driving it downwardly.

14. In a well drilling, apparatus of the class described, a rotating and downwardly moving well drill, hydraulic lmeans within lthe well for rotating said drill, and means within the well for impacting said drill and driving it downwardly.

15. In a well drillin apparatus of the class described, a reciproca 1e and rotatable drill means withinthewell for hammering said drill, and hydraulic means vwithin said well for rotating said drill.

`In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand at San Diego California, this 22nd day of December, 192 i ALEXANDER M. GRANT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2495364 *Jan 27, 1945Jan 24, 1950Clapp William HMeans for controlling bit action
US2613917 *Apr 14, 1948Oct 14, 1952California Research CorpTurbine-impact drill
US2694551 *Feb 11, 1952Nov 16, 1954Snyder Oil Tool CorpImpact drill
US2713992 *Feb 11, 1952Jul 26, 1955Snyder Oil Tool CorpImpact drill
US2742265 *Sep 13, 1954Apr 17, 1956Snyder Robert EImpact drill
US2827263 *Aug 27, 1954Mar 18, 1958American Percussion Tool CompaWell drilling equipment
US2950088 *Mar 25, 1957Aug 23, 1960Scott James GElectric solenoid actuator
US2979142 *Jul 3, 1957Apr 11, 1961Phillips Petroleum CoApparatus for drilling wells
US3132702 *Sep 29, 1960May 12, 1964Impact Rotor Tool IncRotary impact drilling tool
US3166131 *Aug 6, 1962Jan 19, 1965Ingersoll Rand CoRotary percussive rock drill having counter rotation means
US3186498 *Oct 2, 1961Jun 1, 1965Albritton Engineering CorpImpact tool
US3208541 *Jan 29, 1962Sep 28, 1965Lawrence Richard RSpring biased well jar
US3233690 *Sep 2, 1964Feb 8, 1966Lawrence Richard RFlexible well jar
US6047778 *Jun 23, 1999Apr 11, 2000Dresser-Rand CompanyPercussion drill assembly
US7011156 *Feb 19, 2003Mar 14, 2006Ashmin, LcPercussion tool and method
US7784561 *Dec 1, 2005Aug 31, 2010Byung-Duk LimGround drilling hammer and the driving method
WO1995004207A1 *Jul 29, 1994Feb 9, 1995Ira C EdellRotary piston driving mechanism
Classifications
U.S. Classification175/95, 175/104, 175/299, 175/98, 175/413, 173/59, 173/205, 175/298, 173/105, 175/107
International ClassificationE21B4/10, E21B4/00, E21B4/12
Cooperative ClassificationE21B4/12, E21B4/10
European ClassificationE21B4/10, E21B4/12