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Publication numberUS1899626 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 28, 1933
Filing dateJun 17, 1931
Priority dateJun 17, 1931
Publication numberUS 1899626 A, US 1899626A, US-A-1899626, US1899626 A, US1899626A
InventorsMiller Bryan M
Original AssigneeMiller Bryan M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Oxy-acetylene burner
US 1899626 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 28, 1933. WLLER 1,899,626

OXY-ACETYLENE BURNER Filed June 17, 1931 ,8. 211'. Miller Patented Feb. 28, 1933 PATENT OFFICE BRYAN M. MILLER, OF WASHINGTON, DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA OXY-AGETYLENE BURNER Application filed June 17,

This invention relates to oxyacetylene torches or burners and has for an object to provide a burner which may be used for long periods of time to remove paint, rust, etc.,

from large structures, such as bridges, railway coaches and cars, etc., without back fir- 1n The usual type of oxy-acetylene burner used in cutting bars, rails and the like is capa- 0 ble of use only forshort periods and then must be laid aside to cool. This renders such a burner useless for continuous use for many hours, since it is well-known that the heat of the flame creeps back alon the jet block, causing a cherry red glow to he visible, which eventually reaches the manifold or chamber integral with the back of the jet block and ignites the mixture, causing back firing, after which the burner must be allowed to cool before further use.

I have discovered that if the jet block is formed of one block of metal, which constitutes one wall of the manifold, and if the remaining walls of the manifold are formed 2 of a separate plate or plates of metal, welded or otherwise secured to the jet block, the union between the two diiferent metals will be sufficiently imperfect to retard, if not in most instances actually prevent, the conduction of heat back through the jet block to the manifold, so that back firing'is positively eliminated, and thus the tool may be used continuously for hours on a large structure, while, at the same time, the welding of the metals together is suflicient to unite and bond the metals together so that leakage will not occur. 7

One embodiment of carrying the above outlined principle into effect is illustrated in the accompanying drawing and described in the following specification, it being understood that various modifications may be resorted to within the scope of the appended claims without departing from the spirit or sacrificing any of the advantages of the invention.

In the accompanying drawing forming part of this specification,

Figure 1 is a perspective view of an oxy- 1931. Serial No. 545,123.

acetylene burner constructed in accordance with my invention,

Fig. 2 is an enlarged cross sectional view taken on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1,

Fig. 3 is an enlarged longitudinal sectional view taken on the line 33 of Fig. 2,

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary perspective detail View showing the jet block and the separate plates which coact with the jet block in forming the manifold, and v Fig. 5 is a fragmentary sectional view showing a modified form of the invention, in which a single plate coacts with the jet block in forming the manifold.

Referring now to the drawing in which like characters of reference designate similar parts in the various views, 10 designates the usual tubular handle having at the rear end valved connections 11 and 12 for the admission of oxygen and acetylene gas. The front end of the handle is equipped with the usual tubular stem 13 having the usual air valves 14 and terminating in an abruptl bent outlet nozzle 15. These parts are of t e usual and well-known type.

In carrying out the invention, I provide a jet block 16 which preferably is formed of a single block of metal of substantially oblong longitudinal section and cross section, and of relative great width with respect to its length as best shown in Figs. 2 and 3, the block preferably being perforated transversely along the central plane thereof to provide minute long jet passages 17 corresponding in length to the width of the block and which open through the front face 18 and rear face 19 of the block. Adjacent the rear face 19, the block is beveled on each side, as shown at 20.

Preferably, I provide a manifold for the jet block consisting of a pair of plates 21, as best shown'in Figs. 2 and 4. These plates may be formed of the same metal as the jet block and are relatively th n. The plates are placed against the beveled faces 20 of the jet'block and thus converge and meet at a point in alinement with the row of jet passages at a short distance beyond the inner end face 19 of the jet block, as best shown in Fig. 2. The plates are perforated at the central point of their meeting edges to receive the nozzle 15. The meeting edges of the plates are welded together and to the nozzle, as shown at 22. The edges of the plates which lie along the beveled faces 20 of the jet block are welded to the jet block, as shown at 23. By welding, I, of course, include brazing, sweating, or any equivalent method of bonding the plates together and to the jet block and nozzle. Preferably, the ends of the plates 21 are sealed to ether and sealed to the ends of the jet block y the use of enough of the welding material to seal the spaces between the plates and block, as best shown at 24 in Figs. 1 and 3.

It is now .clear that the plates 21 coact with the rear face 19 of the jet block in forming a manifold transversely and connecting all of the jet passages 17, and that such manifold is substantially triangular in outline and is of relatively small size so that, in practice, the manifold affords no more than a passage for the combustible fluid, being of insufficient volumetric capacity to afford any appreciable accumulation of large volumes of combustible fluid in the manifold.

In Fig. 5, there is shown a modified form of manifold, in which I employ a single arched plate 25 of metal, to coact with the rear face 26 of the perforated jet block 27 in forming the manifold, the supply nozzle 28 of the burner entering the crown of the plate at a central point, as above described. In this modified form of the invention, also, the nozzle is bonded to the plate by welding, as shown at 29, and also the edges of the plate are bonded to the beveled faces 30 of the jet block by welding, as shown at 31. The spaces at the ends of the plate are sealed by plugs of welding material 32, as above described.

In both the preferred form of the invention and in the, modified form of the invention, it will be seen that the manifold is formed by a separate plate or plates of metal which coact with the rear face of the jet block adjacent the beveled sides of the block in forming the manifold. Furthermore, it will be observed that the manifold in both instances is no more than a transverse passage for the combustible fluid and is of restricted area so as to prevent accumulat on of large volume of the fluid in the manifold.

In practice, as above stated, it has been found that an oXy-aeetylene burner, constructed as above described, can be used continuously for hours without conduction of heat from the burner block to the manifold suflicient to cause back firing. Consequently, the tool may be used in removing paint and rust and other material from structures such as steel bridges, wood and steel railway coaches and cars, as well as other structures which have considerable exposed area.

By referring now to Fig. 3, it will be seen that a substantially triangular baflic 33 is disposed in the end of the nozzle 15 in both forms of the invention, the sides of the baffle, as shown, performing the function of deflecting the incoming combustible fluid longitudinally toward the ends of the manifold so that the pressure throughout the manifold will be equalized on the jet passages 1?. Otherwise, without this baflie, the pressure on the jet passages directly in alinement with the nozzle might be greater than those nearer the ends of the nozzle.

From the above description it is thought that the construction and operation of my invention will be understood without further explanation.

Having thus described the invention, I claim:

1. An oxy-acetylene burner comprising a tubular handle for supplying a combustible fluid, a jet block of relatively great width with respect to its length having long jet passages corresponding in length to the width of the block and opening through the front and rear wall of the block, the sides of the block being tapered near the rear wall to provide a rear wall of small area, a sheet metal manifold having diverging portions engaging the tapered faces of the jet block and extending beyond the rear face of the jet block and coacting with said rear face in connecting all the intake ends of the jet passages of the block, and means for connecting said tubular handle to said manifold.

2. An oxy-acetylene burner comprising a solid metal jet block having a longitudinal central row of long jet passages corresponding in length to the width of the block and opening through the front and rear faces of the block, said jet block being of relatively great width with respect to its length and having the sides tapered contiguous to said rear face of the block to restrict said rear face to a small superficial area, a pair of inclined sheet metal plates bonded to the tapered faces of the jet block and being bonded together at their longitudinal meeting edges beyond said rear face, said plates coacting with said rear face in forming a manifold of substantially triangular cross section connecting all of said jet passages and of small diameter to prevent accumulation of large volume of the combustible fluid in the manifold, and a hollow handle carried by said manifold for supplying a combustible fluid to said manifold.

3. An oXy-acetylene burner comprising a jet block of relatively great Width with respect to its length having a longitudinal row of long jet passages corresponding in length to the width of the jet block and opening through the front and rear faces of the block, the sides of the block being tapered contiguous to the rear face thereof to provide a rear face of relatively small area, an arched sheet metal manifold of different metal than the jet block having the sides thereof disposed obliquely and bonded to said beveled faces of the jet block and having the crown thereof extending over said rear face of the jet block in close proximity thereto and forming a manifold of relatively small diameter connecting all of said jet passages, and a tubular handle for a combustible fluid passing through an opening in the crown of said arched manifold.

In testimony whereof I afiix my si ature.

BRYAN M. MILLER. 5.]

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2532567 *Aug 7, 1945Dec 5, 1950Nat Cylinder Gas CoDescaling burner
US2566505 *Aug 18, 1948Sep 4, 1951Universal Lubricating SystemsManufacture of lubrication fittings
US2646614 *Aug 18, 1948Jul 28, 1953Universal Lubricating SystemsMethod of making lubricating fittings
US5209028 *Oct 9, 1992May 11, 1993Air Products And Chemicals, Inc.Apparatus to clean solid surfaces using a cryogenic aerosol
US5931721 *Nov 7, 1994Aug 3, 1999Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd.Aerosol surface processing
US5967156 *Nov 7, 1994Oct 19, 1999Krytek CorporationProcessing a surface
US6203406May 11, 1999Mar 20, 2001Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd.Aerosol surface processing
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/530, 239/566
International ClassificationF23D14/38, F23D14/00
Cooperative ClassificationF23D14/38
European ClassificationF23D14/38