Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1901356 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 14, 1933
Filing dateFeb 25, 1932
Priority dateFeb 25, 1932
Publication numberUS 1901356 A, US 1901356A, US-A-1901356, US1901356 A, US1901356A
InventorsPlunkett John H
Original AssigneePatent & Licensing Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Roll roofing package
US 1901356 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 14, 1933- J. H. PLUNKETT ROLL ROOFING PACKAGE I Filed Feb. 25, 1952 IN VEN TOR.

A TTORNEYI Y age constructed .rooting Patented Mar. 14, 1933 UNITED STATES PATENT oFl-lce JOHN H. PLUNXETT, OF BEVERLY` HILLS, CALIFORNIA, ASSIGNOB TO THE PATENT AND LICENSING CORPORATION, MASSACHUSETTS OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS, A CORPORATION OF BOLL ROOFING PACKAGE Application led February 25, 1932. Serial No. 595,096.

This invention relates to packages and has particular reference to pac ages of roofing material wound into rolls for shipment, and known as roll rooting.

A large quantity of flexible composition and building material is marketed in the form of rolls of considerable weight and size. The material is made in continuous sheets which are wound into rolls on a suitable' mandrel and when a roll of desired size has been formed, it is severed from the rest of the sheet and tightly wrapped 1n a sheet of kraft or similar paper of substantially the same length as the roll, the overlapping edges of the wrapper sheet being adhesively unitedf In addition to the Wrapping sheets, muslin caps are frequently placed over vthe ends of the roll and held firmly in place by bands of kraft paper encircling the ends of the roll.

Considerable diiiculty is frequently experienced in opening such packages preparatory to laying the rooin and valuable tlme is thereby lost. Very o ten the roofing material is injured unavoidably or through lack of care in cutting the wrapping from the package by means of a knife or other sharp edge instrument.

The object of my invention is to facilitate the openin of packages of the nature above described y providing a rip cord so that the ackage can be qulckly pened without any 'ability of injury to the c ontents.

Briefly, my invention consists in placing a rip cord preferably between the wrapper and the roofin' material, with the en s of the cord extenin beyond the ends of the Wrapper and seale against the outer surface thereof. By pulling either end of the cord the wrapper ma be torn its entire length.

The nature o my invention will be more fully understood from the following description in conjunction with the accompanying drawing of which;

Figure 1 is a diagrammatic view of a packvention; f

Figure 2 is an enlarged cross-sectional view taken along the line 2-2 of Fi re 1;

Figure 3 is a cross-sectional v1ew of a frag- .and 13, respectively. T

in accordance with my in- Wh ment of the package showing it partially torn open;

Figures 4 to 7 are fragmentary cross-sectional views taken along the lines 4-4 to 7 -7 respectively of Figure 2;

Figure 8 is a' perspective view of the package showing it partially torn open.

Referring to the drawing, the numeral 1 indicates the paper or similar rendible material. In the form shown in the drawings, the wrapper extends substantially the entire length of the roll of roofing material indicated by the reference numeral 2, the successive convolutions of which are clearly shown in Figure 3. The numeral 3 indicates the outermost convolution of the roll of roofing material. The longitudinal edges of the wrapper 1 overlap and are adhesively united together in the usual manner. Between the wrapper and the outermost convolution 3 of the roll is inserted a rip cord 5. This rip cord may be string, tape, wire or any other suitable material of suiiiclent strength to tear thewrapper when used in the manner herein described. Both ends 6 and 7 of the rip cord extend beyond the ends 8 and 9, respectively, of the wrapper and the extending portions 10 and 11 of the cord are carried around the ends 8 and 9 of the Wrapper, and sealed to the outer face thereof b means of seals 12 e seals 'are preferably made of hght weight paper which may be easily torn, and are placed over the extendln portions of the cord, a short distance from e ends thereof. The seals 12 and 13 may be dlspensed with, and the rip cord placed between the roll and wrapper, adjacent the overlapping longitudinal edges thereof, the extendln portions of the cord bein carried around t e ends of the wrapper and brought against the outer face thereof. The ends of the cord arethen inserted between the overlapping mar 'nal portions of the wrapper and scale by means of the adhesive whlch unites the longitudinal edges thereof. ere the seals are used, an appropriate legend may be laced thereon indicating the manner in whic the package is to be o ned. If the seals are not used, a suitable gegend of the same nature may be placed on the on either or both ends of the rip cord.

wrapper adjacent the point or points where the ends of the cord are sealed.

Headers or caps 14 and 15 made of muslin,

paper or any other cheap web or fabric material are placed over the ends of the roll of roofing material and are neatly folded over the ends 8 and 9, respectively, of the wrapper and-adhesively united thereto. The caps also cover those portions of the cord which lie against the outer face of the wrapper adjacent the ends thereof.v The caps, in addition to protecting the edges of the roofing material, assist in holdin the cord in place. ,Adjacent each end of t e roll, encircling bands 16 and 17, made of paper or other suitable material, overlie and are adhesively united to the folded over portion of the caps and the marginal portions of the wrapper. Thea will be seen that when a pull is exerted on4 either of the free ends of the rip cord, the seals 12 and 13 are first ruptured, followed by the tearing of the bands 16 and 17. The caps 14 and 15 are next torn loose by the continued pull. on the cord, adjacent the points where the overlie the n cord. The wrapper 1 is then nally rent its entire length. The dotted lines on Figure 3 indicate successive positions of the cord during the process of tearing the wrapper by pulhng on the upper end of the cord. Thus it will be seen that in addition to tearing the wrapper, the cap is loosened so as to enable it to be grasped between the fingers and removed. s

Instead of bending the extending ,ends of the cord back against the outer face of the wrapper, either one or both extensions ma be carried over the ends of the roll beneat the caps and turned down and secured between the encircling bands and the wrapper on the side of the package opposite to that on which the portion of the cord which is covered by the wrapper, lies. v

The packages may be formed ywithout; the ca or headers 14 and 15 and without the bands 16 and 17 in which case, the cord is placed between the wrapper and roll of roofmg as above described, and preferably adhesively united to the inner face of the wraping sheet. The cord is then sealed adjacent its ends, against the outer face of the wrapper.

In place of the rip cord, two adjacent rows of perforations may be made the entire length of the wrapper and strips of tape united to the ends of the portion of the wrapper between the rows o perforations, so that when the tape is pulled, it will cause the between the rows of perforations to loose, thereby splitting open the wrapper.

My invention is not limited to roll roofing packages but embraces packages containing such materials as building, insulating and sheathing papers as well as mulch paper.

HavingV thus described certain embodiments of my invention, it should be evident to those skilled in the art that various changes and ,modifications might be made therein without departing from its spirit or scope as defined`V by the appended claims.

I claim as my invent-ion:

1. A package comprising a roll of roofing material enclosed by a rendible wrapper, a rip cord between said roll and said wra per, the ends of said cord extending beyon the ends of the wrapper and being bent back against the outer face thereof, and means for sealing said cord to the outer face of the wrapper adjacent the ends of the cord with the free ends of the cord extending beyond said sealing means.

2. A package comprising a roll of roofing material enclosed by a rendible wrapper, a rip cord between said roll and said wrap r, the ends of said cord extending beyond t e ends of the wrapper and being bent back against the outer face thereof, a rendible band encircling each end of said wrapper adjacent the ends of the roll and adhesively united thereto, said bands overlying the bent back portions of the cord and serving to hold the cord firmly in place.

3. A package 'comprising a roll of roofing material enclosed by a rendible wrapper, a rip cord between said roll and said wrapper, the elids of said cord extending beyond the ends of the wrapper and being bent back against the o'uter face thereof, a cap on each end of said roll adhesively united to the wrapper and a rendible band encircling each end of the wrapper adjacent the ends of the roll and adhesivel united to said wrapper and said ca s, the bent back portions of said cord under g'said caps and said bands and adapt to rend the same upon a pull thereon.

4. A ackage comprising a roll of rooting materia enclosed by a rendible wrapper, a ri cord between said roll and said wrapper, said cord being anchored adjacent one end of the wrapper and extending beyond the opposite end thereof, the extending portion being bent back against the outer face of the wrapper, a cap on each end of said roll 'adhesively united to the wrapper, and a rendi` ble band encircling each end thereof and ad- \hesive1y united to the wrapper and said ca the cap and band at one end overlying e bent back portion of said cord.

5. A package comprising a roll of roofing material enclosed by a rendible wrapper, a

pprtion torn rip cord between said roll and said wrapper,

said cord being anchored adjacent one end of the Wrapper andextending beyond the opposite end thereof, the extendingportion being bent back against the outer face of the wrapper, a rendible band encircling each end of the wrapper and adhesively united thereto, the band at one end overlying said bent back portion of the cord and servlng to hold it firmly in place. l Si ned at Los Angeles iri the county -of Los ngeles and State of California this day of Feb. 13th, A. D. 1932. JOHN H. PLUNKETT, v

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2747345 *Oct 3, 1949May 29, 1956Plastino James JMethod of sealing cans
US3104758 *Mar 1, 1961Sep 24, 1963 Cryogenic storage and insulation means
US5127527 *Nov 13, 1990Jul 7, 1992Graham Creative Packaging Company, Inc.Openable pallet sleeve for a pallet assembly
US5555978 *Oct 5, 1995Sep 17, 1996Elsner Engineering Works, Inc.Wound roll and closure strip assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/407, 229/87.5
International ClassificationB65D75/52, B65D75/66, B65D85/66
Cooperative ClassificationB65D85/66, B65D75/66
European ClassificationB65D85/66, B65D75/66