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Publication numberUS1904912 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 18, 1933
Filing dateJul 6, 1928
Priority dateJun 16, 1925
Publication numberUS 1904912 A, US 1904912A, US-A-1904912, US1904912 A, US1904912A
InventorsWolters Carl F
Original AssigneeRemington Rand Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Monolithic filing cabinet and attachments therefor
US 1904912 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 18, 1933. c F WQLTERS 1,904,912

MONOLITHIC FTLING CABINET AND ATTACHMENTS THEREFOR Original Filed June 16. 1925 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 I I I N h I Q \/0 T I h I Q I I L 5 w l l i. I Q 1 r i q x I g April 18, 1933. Q F. WQLTERS 1,904,912

MONOLITHIC FILING CABINET AND ATTACHMENTS THEREFOR Original Filed June 16. 1925 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 W MCBWJ A ril 18, 1933. c. F. WOLTERS MONOLITHIC FILING CABINET AND ATTACHMENTS THEREFOR 25 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 Original Filed June l6. l9

April 18, 1933.

C. F. WOLTERS MONOLITHIC FILING CABINET AND ATTACHMENTS THEREFO Original Filed June 16. 1925 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 I I Afimlz Patented Apr. 18, 1933 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE our. 1'. WOL'IERS, or MARIETTA, 01110, ASSIGNOR '10 mmmeroii mm) me, or

BUFFALO, NEW YORK, A CORPORATION or DELAWARE.

IONOLITHIC FILING CABINET AND ATTACHMENTS THEREFOR Original application filed June 16, 1925, Serial No. 37,527, new Patent No. 1,807,948, dated June 2, 1931.

Divided and this application filed This invention relates to improvements in vertical filing cabinets and, more particularly, cabinets adapted to afford safe storage space for vertical files, and is a division of 5 copending application Serial No. 37,527, filed June 16, 1925.

Cabinets of this character preferably have a cast monolithic body provided with a plurality of superimposed separate and inde- :0 pendent compartments in each of which a drawer is mounted for sliding movement. The'se drawers are supported on guides which must necessarily be suspended from suitable anchorages, and it is also desirable to provide means whereby the drawers may be locked.

Considerable difficulty has been experienced in finding satisfactory means whereby suitable anchorage for the drawer guides may be established in the cast body structure,

the nature of the cast being such as to preclude the possibility of. attachment of such anchorages by the usual screws, bolts or nails.

Therefore, an object of this invention is to provide practical means for supporting the drawer guides by which such means may be incorporated in the cast cabinet body.

Another and important object of the in- 80 vention resides in the cabinet structure consisting of a monolithic body encased in an integral imperforate casing, said body being divided into a plurality of independent compartments insulated from one another adapted to receive drawers carrying monolithic fronts formed for sealing cooperation with the front of the cabinet.

Another object of the invention resides in the provision of a monolithic body formed 4 with independent compartments to independently protect the contents in each compartment in which the monolith is of substantially uniform section and encased in an imperforate casing having heat dissipating properties.

A further object of the invention is to so constitute the drawer latching means that it too may be efiiciently incorporated into the structure.

Monolithic cabinet bodies are usually cast July 6, 1928. Serial No. 290,864.

and, in accordance with this invention, the anchorages or supports for the drawer guides are cast directly in the monolith; in the pie ferred embodiment of the invention, the drawer guides are supported on upright metallic elements, which extend for the greater portion of the height of the cabinet, and serve to support all of the guides. 'lhese elements are introduced into the construction by mounting them on the cores of 0 the mold which are utilized in effecting the casting of the monolith. In this manner, said elements may be accurately positioned and spaced with respect to one another, and when the casting is made, they are embodied directly therein. After the casting is set, the retaining means, by which such elements are secured to the cores, are released and said cores are withdrawn, leaving the supporting elements permanently in position.

Another object of the invention is to so fashion one of the drawer supporting elements that it serves as a housing for a drawer latching bolt which may also be included in the cabinet body during casting thereof.

Features of the invention other than those advertcd to, will be apparent from the hereinafter detailed description and claims, when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

The accompanying drawings illustrate one practical embodiment of the structural features of this invention, but it will be understood that this showing is for the purpose of illustration only and does not define the limits of the invention.

Figure l is a transverse section of the outer sheet metal skin of the body of the cabinet, as initially constructed.

Figure 2 is a view similar to Figure 1, but illustrating the mold and cores in section and in a position ready for the casting operation.

Figure 3 is a section on the line 3-3 of Figure 2 showing the outer skin in section, but the male mold members in elevation.

Figure 4 is a transverse section through the finished monolithic body of the cabinet with the back in place.

Figure 5 is a view similanto Figure 4, but showing the drawer guides and the drawer in partially open position.

Figure 6 is 9. pers ective view of the body of the cabinet with t e drawers removed and certain parts broken away in the interest of clearness.

Figure 7 is a vertical front-to-rear section through the upper portion of a completed cabinet showing the drawers and their latching and locking means in elevation and the body of the cabinet in section, the drawers being partially opened, and

Figure 8 is a perspective view of the latch actuating member mounted on the uppermost drawer of Figure 7.

In building a cabinet in accordance with the present invention, the outer skin or casing 1 is first constructed and formed 1nto proper shape. This outer skin is of sheet metal and is made in the size and proportion desired. It is preferaby rectangular, is closed on its sides, top an bottom, while its sixth side or front is provided with drawer openings 4 having channel shaped cross members between said openings. The back is left open, the rear wall being later attached, for reasons which will be hereinafter explained. About the margin of each drawer opening 4, the sheet metal skin is stepped and shaped in the usual manner as shown at 3, and interiorly of each drawer opening the skin is stepped back as shown at 5.

After the outer skin has been formed as described, it is laid face down on a molding board 6 and thereafter a female mold or form 6a is placed about the skin. This form serves to hold the skin in proper shape and to preclude its walls from bulging when plastic material is subsequently introduced into the interior of such outer skin. Tapered hollow cores 7 are thereafter adapted to be brought into cooperation with the outer skin and since a three drawer cabinet is chosen for illustration, three cores will be employed.

Before placing these cores within the outer skin they are very carefully arranged in proper relation and the drawer supporting elements are mounted thereon. These sup porting elements are designated 8, 9, 10 and 11. The elements 8 and 9 are mounted near the smaller ends of the cores in parallel relation to one another and in a position to be upstanding in a finished cabinet, while the elements 10 and 11 are mounted nearer the larger ends of the cores in parallel relation to each other and to the elements 8 and 9. The elements 8 and 9 are of channelled cross section and have stepped flanges. They are mounted with their at sides abutting the cores and are held in position by screws 12, which are inserted from the interior of the cores.

The supporting elements 10 and 11 are each of a box-like construction and embody a channelled section 13, corresp nding in shape to the channelled sections 8 and 9, and a cover plate 14, the lateral edges of which are lapped over the flanges of the channelled sections 13 to form a hollow boxlike construction. The supporting elements 10 and 11 are secured to the cores by means of screws 15, introduced from the inside of the cores.

Prior to securing the several supporting elements to the cores, a bar 16 is positioned within the element 11 and this bar constitutes part of the latching means for the several drawers and will be hereinafter more fully described in this connection. The bar 16 is housed within the box-like supporting element 11 and is introduced therein prior to securing this element to the cores 7. After the drawer supporting elements have been rigidly secured to the several cores 7 in the manner described the cores are transported to and lowered into the outer skin. They come to a seat on the molding board 6 as shown in Fig. 3 and it will be noted from this figure that those portions 7a of the cores which extend through the drawer openin s of the skin are not tapered as the remain er of said cores, but are straight. This permits the cores to be introduced in the manner described and during this operation the cores will be automatically centralized.

After the cores, with the drawer supports assembled thereon, have been brought into proper cooperation with the skin, as described, the material which is to form the monolithic structure is introduced in plastic condition and fills the entire confines of the outer skin exteriorly of the cores and in so doing thoroughly embeds the stepped portion 5, which constitutes the free edge of the skin, as clearly shown in Figure 4, so as to thoroughly anchor the margin of the skin at its ree edges. At the same time flanges of the supporting elements 8 and 9, as well as the corresponding parts of the supporting elements 10 and 11 are embedded in the material and are firmly anchored therein with the inner surface of the cast material flush with the surface 4 of the skin and with the corresponding exposed surfaces of the supporting elements.

The outer skin is filled to its upper edge, and the plastic material thereupon left to set or solidify. After sufiiciently hardened,

either naturally or artificially, the metallic.

back plate 2 is applied to the monolithic body by welding said plate, or otherwise securing it to the side walls.

It is feasible, moreover, in practice to se cure the back plate in position immediately after the casting is made and without waiting for it to set.

The female mold members or forms 6a are now removed and the cabinet body, with cores therein, is tilted over to provide access to the interior of the cores. The screws 12 and 15 are now removed to release the su porting elements 8, 9, 10 and 11 and t e cores are thereupon withdrawn. The .casting, with the outer skin and supportin elements now permanently associated t erewith is now ready to receive the drawer guides.

While the different forms of guides may be employed, a very satisfactory arrangement is shown in Figure 6 as comprising three telescoping sections 17, 18 and 19, it being understood that two such guides are associated with each drawer when positioned on opposite sides thereof. Each guide section 19 is secured to one of the supporting elements 8 and the corresponding supporting element 10 by means of screws passed through such guide sections and entering the tapped holes 12a and 15a in the supporting elements which were previously occupied during the casting operation by the screws 12 and 15. The insertion of these screws serve to firmly mount the telescoping section 19 in position. The section 17 is permanently secured to the corresponding side of the associated drawer by screws or rivets passed through holes 20, while the section 18 is interposed between the sections 17 and 19 and interfits with both. This arrangement permits the drawer to bewith- .drawn almost entirely from its compartment while remaining properly supported on the guides.

It will of course be understood that each of the three compartments shown is fitted with guides in the same manner as described in connection with the single guide already referred to, and that the drawer is cooperable with each compartment. In Fig. 7 of the drawings, two drawers are shown, the upper or top drawer being designated 21, and next lower drawer being designated 21a. These two drawers are identical in construction and the bottom drawer is constructed in a like manner. The body of each drawer is preferably made of sheet metal and the front of each drawer is made in the form of a monolithic slab; provided with an outer skin or shell of sheet metal. The four margins of each slabare shaped to interfit with the drawer openings of the cabinet body whenthe drawers are closed. This interfitting of each slab or plate member with the cabinet is designed to effectively seal the contents of the compartment against heat from an external source, while the drawer guides serve to mount the drawer in spaced relation from the walls of the cabinet.

Reference has hereinbefore been made to the latching-bar 16 which is mounted for sliding movement within the supporting element 11. This bar constitutes a latching bolt and carries locking pins 25, 25a and 25b which project through slots 26 formed in the channelled section 13 and extend for an appreciable distance into the interior of each drawer cavity and into cooperative relation with latching means mounted on the several drawers.

By reference to Figure 7, it will be noted that the means mounted on the drawer 22 and adapted for cooperation with the pin 25 constitutes actuating means for the bar and is in the form of an off-set plate 27. This plate is shown in perspective in Figure 8 as having feet 28 perforated for attachment to the side of the drawer. The plate is provided with a slot 29, a portion 30 of which is inclined, while a further portion 31 of which is horizontal.

The latching bar 16 normally gravitates into its lowermost position as shown in full lines in Figure 7 and the plate 27 is mounted in such relative position on the drawer that when the drawer is moved from open to closed position, bar will enter and be engaged by the inclined portion 30 of the slot, so that as closing movement of the drawer continues, the latching bar will be elevated. When the drawer is fully closed, the pin will occupy the horizontal portion 31 of the slot and the bar will be locked in its uppermost dotted line position of Figure 7.

The vertical operation of the latching bar is necessary in order that the bar may be shifted to bring the pins 25a and 25?) into and 'out of cooperation with latching devices mounted on the lower drawers. The latching devices for each of such drawers is the same in both instances and embodies a spring pressed latch 32 pivoted at 33 and cooperating with a stop 3%. The pivot 33 and stop 34 are rigid with the drawer and the nose of the latch is inclined as shown at 35.

When either of the lower drawers are opened, their latches 32 will be forced by the spring 33 into substantially horizontal position and if the uppermost drawer 21 is opened, the lower drawers can be opened and closed without effecting any movement of the latch or any latching of the parts. This is because of the fact that the latching bar will be in its depressed position and will hold the locking pins 25, 25a and 256 out of the paths of the latches. However, if the upper drawer is closed, and the latching bar consequently elevated, the subsequent closing of one of the lower drawers will cause this latch to ride over the locking (for example locking pin 25a) and to automatically engage with such pin, as shown in dotted llnes in Figure 7. When any lower drawer is locked by engagement with the latching pin in the manner described, it can,

the pin 25 of the latching pin not be opened until the top drawer is.

opened to permit lowering of the latchin bar 16. In ractice, the top drawer is pre erably provided with a suitable key actuated lock 23, so that it may be locked in closed position independently of the latching means which I have hereinbefore described and since it controls the operation of such lockin means, it necessarily follows that the loc ing of the top drawer in closed osition will preclude the opening of any 0 the other drawers. It will be equally clear, however, that if any of'the other drawers are 0 en at the time of locking the top drawer, tl fese 0 'en drawers may e closed at will and wil automatically look upon the completion of such operation.

It will be apparent from the foregoing detailed description that the invention provides a novel method for incorporating drawer supports in a monolithic filing cabinet. The monolith may be economically and efficiently produced and by casting the supports direct y in the monolith a strong and rigid construction results and there is no possibility of the supports becoming disengaged through excessive strains or hard usage. These supports, in fact, become a permanent part of the cabinet and cannot under any clrcumstances be torn therefrom. The casting of the supports direct-1y, within the monolith during t e casting operation does not re uire appreciably more time than was hereto ore necessary to simply cast the cabinet without such supports. oreover, when the supports are cast in, all the time heretofore required for subsequently installing supports for the drawers is eliminated and a better construction results in which these supports have stress reducing cooperation with the monolith. In addition, the drawer guides when assembled on these supports cooperate in reducing and distributing stresses in the monolith.

The structure is a marked improvement on prior practice. The construction is not only better from the standpoint of anchorage, but, furthermore reinforce the entire cabinet by the inclusion of such supports. They extend substantially the full height of the cabinet and impart thereto great rigidity and distribute stresses which is particularly desirable in maintaining the integrity of the parts when a cabinet falls as in the event of fire.

It will be noted that the compartments in the monolith body are of greater length and width than height. By having these compartments of less height than their other dimensions, the heat of a fire applied to the exterior of the cabinet will be more equally distributed in each compartmentso as to prevent as far as possible the concentration of heat in a small space, thereby preventing or lessening the tendency of the temperature within the cabinet to become elevated to such a point that the contents will ignite.

Of considerable practical importance also is the housing of the latching bolt within one of the supports. This assemblage not only maintains the latchin bolt ,in concealed position wherein it is ull protected against dama e, but roper guiding means is thereby a orded or the operation of such bolt. Moreover, the casting of the latching bolt in the wall of the cabinet conserves the space within the drawer chambers and the drawers can be made wider than has hitherto been possible under the practice of mounting the latching means inside of said chambers.

The foregoing detailed description sets forth the invention in its preferred practical form but the invention is to be understood as fully commensurate with the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A fire proof cabinet, comprising a monolithic body formed with a plurality of thermally insulated compartments open at the front end, a metallic shell encasing said body, a drawer in each compartment mounted for movement into and out of said compartment, a monolithic front on each drawer, a metallic cover encasing said front, the marginal portion of each front and cover being formed for sealing cooperation with the front of said shell and body in closed position to insulate the contents of each compartment from external heat.

2. A fire proof cabinet, comprising a monolithic body formed with a plurality of thermally insulated compartments open at the front end, a metallic shell encasing said body, the front portion of said body and shellcontiguous to said compartments being formed with alternate grooves and projections, and a drawer slidable in each compartment having the front marginal portion formed for interfitting sealing cooperation with said grooves and projections.

3. A fire proof cabinet, comprising a monolithic body formed with a plurality of relatively insulated independent compartments, said body having walls of substantially uniform cross section enclosing and separating each compartment, a casing of heat dissipating material enclosing said body permanently attached thereto, and a drawer slidable in each compartment having a front formed for sealing cooperation around its marginal portions with said cabinet for protecting the contents thereof.

4. A fire proof cabinet, comprising a monolithic body formed with a plurality of relatively insulated independent compartments, said body having Walls of substantially uniform cross section enclosing and separating each compartment, a casing of heat dissipating material encasing said body and permanently attached thereto, and a drawer for each compartment having a drawer front formed for sealing engagement and cooperation with said body, said drawers being slidable in and out of said compartments and supporting said drawer fronts for movement in substantially parallel relation to the front of said body.

5. A thermally equalized fire proof cabinet having in combination, a body of heat insulating fire resistant material formed with a plurality of adjacent thermally independent chambers open at the front end, an imperforate metallic casing embracing said body, a drawer for each chamber, means mounting the drawers for movement into and out of said chambers and for spacing the drawers from the walls of said body, and a front member on each drawer formed of heat insulating fire resistant material having sealing cooperation with the body when the drawer is in the chamber to insulate each chamber from fire and heat external thereto.

6. A thermally equalized fire proof cabinet having in combination, a body of heat insulating fire resistant material formed with a plurality of adjacent thermally independent chambers open at the front end, a metallic covering encasing said body, a file drawer for each chamber, supporting means mounted in each chamber supporting the drawer for movement in and out of said chamber and for spacing the drawers from the walls of said body, a front member for each drawer formed of heat insulating fire resistant material, and a metallic covering for said front member, said front member having fire resistant sealing cooperation at its margin with the body when the drawers are supported by said means in the chambers. said drawers separating and insulating the contents from contact with the body inside the chambers, said chambers with the front members in sealed relation cooperating to insulate one another from heat having an external source, to localize heat transmission to the chamber. adjacent said source, and said covering being adapted to dissipate heat on the exterior of the body.

7 A fire proof filing cabinet, comprising a monolithic body formed with a plurality of relatively insulated chambers open at the front end, a plurality of drawer guide supports embedded in said body, forming a reinforcement for said body, and having portions exposed in spaced parallel relation at opposite sides of each chamber, a drawer for each chamber, and means carrying each drawer attached to said supports for mounting said drawers for movement into and out of said chambers.

8. A fire proof filing cabinet, comprising a monolithic body formed with a plurality of independent relatively insulated chambers open at the front end, a drawer for each chamber, drawer guides supporting said drawers for movement thereon into and out of said chambers, and a plurality of supports for said drawer guides mounted in said body, said supports and drawer guides cogperating to form a reinforcement for said ody.

9. A fire proof filing cabinet, comprising a monolithic body formed with a plurality of independent relatively insulated chambersopen at the front. end, a drawer for each chamber, drawer guides supporting said drawers for movement thereon into and out of said chambers, a plurality of supports for said drawer guides mounted 1n said body, and monolithic fire proof plate members forming the front of each drawer and having sealing cooperation with said body to seal said chambers in the closed position of the drawers.

10. A fire proof filing cabinet, comprising a monolithic body formed with a plurality of independent relatively insulated chambers open at the front end, a drawer for each chamber, drawer guides supporting said drawers for movement thereon into and out of said chambers, a plurality of supports for. said drawer guides mounted In said body, one of said supports being hollow, and a latching means for said drawers having parts'encased androperable in said hollow support.

11. A fire proof filing cabinet, comprising a monolithic body formed with a plurality of independent relatively insulated chambers open at the front end, a drawer for each chamber, drawer guides supporting said drawers for movement thereon into and out of said chambers, a plurality of supports for said drawer guides mounted in said body, one of said supports being tubular, and a locking mechanism including a latching bar slidably mounted in said tubular support, and drawer carried means for cooperation therewith to latch said drawers in closed position.

12; A fire proof filing cabinet, comprising a monolithic body formed with a plurality of independent relatively insulated chambers open at the front end, a drawer for each chamber, drawer guides supporting said drawers for movement thereon into and out of said chambers, a plurality of supports for said drawer guides mounted in said body, one of said supports being tubular, and a locking mechanism including a latching bar slidably mounted in said tubular support, drawer carried means for cooperation therewith to latch said drawers in closed position, and operating means for said bar member carried by one of said drawers operable to control latching of all of the drawers.

13. A heat resisting filing cabinet comprising a metallic casing forming the outer walls insulating head adapted in the. closed position of said drawer to form a heat proof closure for its compartment.

14. A heat resisting filing cabinet comprising an outer metallic casing open on one side, a monolithic inner casing of insulating material consisting of walls forming a lining for the walls of said outer casing and partition walls dividing the space within said inner casing into separate compartments having openings through the open side of said outer casing, and drawers mounted in said compartments and having insulating heads forming a separate closure .for each compartment.

15. A heat resistin filing cabinet comprising an outer meta lic casing having one of its sides open, and a frame member extending across its open side to form a plurality of openings, an inner casing of insulating material consisting of walls extending throughout the inner surface of said outer casing and an integral partition wall registering at its free edge with said frame member, the surfaces of said walls enclosing all but one side of separate compartments,

and drawers mounted in said compartments each having an insulated head forming a closure for each compartment when in closed position.

16. A heat resisting filing cabinet comprising an outer metallic casing having its front side open, a plurality of frame members extending transversely of said open side and forming a plurality of smaller openings, a monolithic inner casing of insulating material consisting of walls lining the walls of said outer casing and partition walls extending the depth of said inner casing from said frame members, said walls dividing the space into a plurality of individual insulated compartments, and drawers mounted in said compartments and having insulated heads adapted to close the openings to each compartment when said drawers are in closed position.

17. A fire resisting filing cabinet comprising an outer metal casing open at one side, metallic frame members extending transversely of said open side and forming a plurality of openings, said frame members having inwardly facing channels, an inner casing of heat insulating material consisting of Walls extending throughout the inner surface of said outer casing and integral partition Walls dividing the space into a pluralitg of separate insulated compartments, the rec ed es of said partition walls fillin the channe s in said frame members, an drawers mounted in said compartments and having insulated heads adapted to form closures therefor when in closed position.

18. A construction for fire resisting filing devices comprising an outer sheet metal casing havin a front formed to provide a plurality of rawer compartment openings and an inner monolithic structure of heat insulating material consisting of self sustaining integral walls formin partition walls, d1- vidin the space withm said easing into a plura ity of drawer compartments, drawers slid'ably mounted in said compartments and comprising front sections of heat resisting material, tracks for said drawers mounte in each compartment, and supports for said tracks comprisin vertical bars embedded in the side walls 0 insulating material.

19. A heat resisting fihng cabi et comprising an outer sheet metal casing aving a front formed to provide a plurality of drawer compartment openings and having a vertical contour to form grooves and rabbets surrounding each opening, an inner'casing of insulating material formin integral walls having their inner surfaces ush with the openings formed by said frame members to form a plurality of drawer com artments, a drawer in each compartment an comprising a front section having an outer metallic shell and an inner body of insulating material, said shell having marginal grooves and rabbets adapted for sealing contact with said grooves and rabbets of said front.

20 In a fire resisting filing cabinet, the combination of a casin comprisin an outer metallic shell and an inner mono ithic casing of insulating material formin a plurality of drawer compartments, an a drawer for each compartment comprising a sheet metal body, and a front drawer section mounted on said sheet metal body consisting of an inner monolithic body and an outer metal shell on said body.

21. In a fire resisting filing cabinet, the combination of an outer metallic casing an inner casing of reinforced monolithic con-' struction forming a plurality of drawer compartments, a drawer for each compartment, drawer supporting tracks mounted in said compartments, and means for sup orting said tracks comprising bars embedde in side walls of said inner casing adjacent opposite ends of said tracks, and means securing said tracks to said bars.

22. A heat resisting cabinet comprising an outer metallic easing having a front formed to provide a plurality of openings, an inner casing of insulating material consisting of integral linin and artiton walls, the former extending t roug out the inner surface of said outer casing and the latter dividing the space into a plurality of separate compartments registering with the openings in said front, and drawers slidably mounted in said compartments and having said means in the chambers, said drawers separating and insulating the contents from contact with the body inside the chambers, said chambers with the front members in formed with an opening, channel-shaped ing an outer casing of sheet metal having a F insulated heads adapted to provide a heat resisting closure for each compartment when said drawers are in closed position.

23. A fire resisting filing cabinet comprising a metallic outer casing having a front sealed relation cooperating to insulate one another from heat having an external source, to localize heat transmission to the chamber adjacent said source, and to dissipate said heat in the body. CARL F. WOLTERS. cross members dividing the open front of said casing-into a plurality of drawer compartment openings, an inner monolithic casmg of insulating material consisting of 15 walls, lining the walls of said outer casing and abutting at their free edges with the front of said outer casin and partition walls forming a plurality 0% separate insulated compartments and having their free edges 20 embraced by said channel-shaped cross members, and drawers mounted in said compartments having insulated heads forming separate closures for said compartments.

24. A fire resisting filing device comprisfront wall formed with an opening, channelshaped cross frame members attached to said front wall and'extnding across the opening therein and dividing said opening for forming a plurality of separate compartment openings a monolithic structure of heat insulating material within said outercasing ,"y and consisting of integral walls having their free edge portions filling the channelsof said frame members and abuttin said front wall, and drawers mounted in said compartments having insulated heads.

25. A thermally equalized fire proof cabinet having in combination, a body of heat insulating fire resistant material formed with a plurality of adjacent thermally independent chambers open at the front end, a drawer for each chamber, means mount ing the drawers for movement into and out 5 of said chambers and for spacing the drawers from the walls of said body, and a front member on each drawer formed of heat insulating fire resistant material having sealing cooperation with the body when the drawer IS in the chamber to insulate each chamber from fire and heat external thereto.

26. A thermally ualized fire proof cabinet having in 'combmaton, a body of heat insulating fire resistant material formed 5 with a plurality of adjacent thermally inde ndent chambers open at the front end, a El e drawer for each chamber, supporting means mounted in each chamber supporting the drawer for movement in and out of said 0 chamber and for spacing the drawers from the walls of said body, and a front member for each drawer formed of heat insulating fire resistant material having fire resistant sealing cooperation at its Fmargin with the body when the drawers are supported by

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2547513 *Jun 15, 1946Apr 3, 1951Shaw Walker CoLock mechanism for insulated filing cabinets
US2783113 *Jun 7, 1954Feb 26, 1957Heintz Mfg CoTelevision cabinet
US2783114 *Apr 13, 1954Feb 26, 1957Nat Plainfield CorpSheet metal integral television cabinet
US2966384 *Dec 24, 1958Dec 27, 1960Art Steel Company IncLocking device for cabinet drawers
US6044777 *Feb 9, 1998Apr 4, 2000Walsh; Michael J.Composite metal safe and method of making
Classifications
U.S. Classification109/53, 312/220, 109/59.00R, 312/221, 109/82
International ClassificationE05G1/08, E05G1/00
Cooperative ClassificationE05G1/08
European ClassificationE05G1/08