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Publication numberUS1905488 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 25, 1933
Filing dateJun 5, 1930
Priority dateJun 5, 1930
Publication numberUS 1905488 A, US 1905488A, US-A-1905488, US1905488 A, US1905488A
InventorsNack Leo W
Original AssigneeNack Leo W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Collapsible steel cable reel
US 1905488 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 25, 1933. w NACK 1,905,488

COLLAPSIBLE STEEL CABLE REEL Filed June 5, 1950 4 Sheets-Sheet l April 25, 1933. 1.. w. NACK COLLAPSIBLE STEEL CABLE REEL 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 5, 1930 April 25, 1933. w. NACK COLLAPSIBLE STEEL CABLE REEL Filed June 5, 1950 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 April 25, 1933. L. w. NACK 1,905,488

CO LLAPSIBLE STEEL CABLE REEL Filed June 5, 1950 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Patented Apr. 25,

hurrah LEO W. NACIK, 6F CHICAGO, ILLINOIS CDLLATSIBLE STEEL CABLE REEL Application filed June 5, 1930. Serial No. 459,299.

This invention relates, generally speaking, to reels or drums and particularly to reels for storing and for shipping cables, and is especially concerned with an assembled collapsible metal reel in which numerous novel and advantageous structural and functional features are incorporated.

A drum or reel structure designed in the past for the purpose of storing and of shipping cables usually comprises a central barrel body made of wood and provided with two lateral flanges of the same material. The several parts of such a reel of well known construction are permanently assembled and secured by means of suitable bolts, screws or nails,

and the lateral flanges are joined by means of axially extending special bolts. The cable is disposed on the central barrel portion within the storage space defined by the lateral flanges, as on a spool, and the reel is then prepared for shipment by attaching to the flanges so called lagging bars, i. e., wooden cross bars, which are peripherally attached to the flanges and cover the cable coiled on the central barrel body between the flanges. These lagging bars are nailed peripherally to the flanges and finally secured by means of a steel tape which is suitably attached circumferentially around the lagging bars and seals the reel.

I have observed in practice that this method of storing and of shipping cables has numerous disadvantages resulting from the construction of the reel as outlined above, and I will briefly list these disadvantages and objectionable features in the following, so that the description of my invention, which is to follow, may be readily understood and appreciated. The wooden drum, constructed in the past as intimated above, is merely a temporary article due to the deterioration which is caused as a consequence of its structure. It is apparent that such reel should be so constructed as to represent a permanent article. However, at the present time, such wooden reel can be used with safety only a very limited number of times, say, for about three to four shipments. The flanges become ragged and do not take the nails due to repeated nailing and removal of the lagging bars. lln storage, such reels begin to deteriorate, the rotting beginning within the flanges, although the exterior may not display the deterioration. Such reels collapse frequently before the cable stored on them is used.

Therefore, such wooden reels need mainte nance and often replacement of parts. One of the parts which is frequently damaged is, for example, the bolts holding the two flanges axially with relation to the central barrel portion. Stresses imposed on the reel often cause bending and even breakage of such a bolt, necessitating replacement which is relatively expensive since these bolts are special equipment. It is very difficult to remove such a bolt from the reel when it is bent out of shape and the use of a torch for cutting the bolt prior to removal is frequently required;

' Nails in the Wood structure, particularly 9 the nails holding the lagging bars often Work loose and damage the cable on the reel. They also represent a hazard to the workmen handling the reel.

The time necessary for attaching the lagging bars to a reel, or for removing the same from a reel, is appreciable due to the fact that the lagging bars are rigidly attached to the flanges by means of nails. Frequently the lagging bars split and break, resulting in wastage. In addition, there is the ever present danger of injury to the workmen engaged in handling the reels and the possibility of damage to the cable. r

The old wooden reel structure does not lend itself to standardization of parts applicable to different sizes of reels. Accordingly there are at the present time numerous different structures used, designed to meet the requirements of reels of the various sizes and for different purposes.

The weight of a large wooden reel is considerable due to the massive structure required for supporting the great weight of a cable and due to the fact that the reel must withstand the wear of transportation and in- -stallation. The rolling of the reel over uneven ground imposes great stresses upon the reel structure, damaging its parts.

Empty reels when returned'to the factory consume a large amount of car space. In case of a 72 inch reel, a size widely used at the present time, only twelve such reels can be transported in an ordinary 36 foot car.

The principal aim and purpose of my invention, which I am about to describe, is to furnish a novel cable reel which avoids the above and other objectionable features.

Generally speaking, the novel and improved cable reel incorporating the various features of my invention consists in one embodiment of a sectional collapsible central barrel portion which is rovided with detachable laterally disposed flhnges to form a drum or reel of spool like shape for receiving the cable. Each of the flanges is constructed of a number of interchangeable reinforced sections joined by means of bolts or rivets- A closure cooperating with'the corresponding flange and with the barrel portion is removably attached at each-end of the barrel portion. An opening thru the end closures pro-' vides for rotatably mounting the reel on asuitable shaft. All parts of this reel are.

made of metal and are standardized throughout, providing for economy of construction and production, and adapting principles of the invention to be applied to various types and sizes of reels for different urposes. The peripheral rim of each of the anges attached to the barrel portion is provided with peripheral openings for receiving and for holding the lagging bars which are applied to the flanges by simply successively slipping them in place instead of nailing them individually to the rim of the flanges as was done in case of wooden reels. In one embodiment, the lagging bars are slipped in place on the flanges endwise and are held collectively against axial displacement by means of a suitable locking provision.

Some of the advantages resulting from my invention are enumerated below as follows:

The steel reel of my novel structure is a permanent article, requiring for maintenance merely an occa ional spray with paint. Deterioration is practically negligible as compared with the deterioration occurring in wooden reels. Replacements of parts, should such replacements become necessary, are easily carried out and are inexpensive since all parts are standardized.

The use of nails is eliminated, avoiding the danger of inj ury to the-workmen and damage to the cable.

The time for attaching lagging bars to I the steel reel and for removing the same is reduced to about one-third as compared with the time required for attaching the lagging bars used in connection with prior oonstruction of wooden reels.

The weight of the reel is reduced, and, at the same time, its production cost is decreased without in any way impairing the reliability of its operation. In fact, the reliability of the collapsible steel reel made in accordance with my invention is greater than that of prior structures.

The reel can be readily taken apart when empty, and prepared for shipment to the factory, the individual parts consuming only about one-third of the car space now required for shipping wooden reels. This means in practice that the parts for about thirty-six reels of my novel structure can be shipped in a 36 foot railroad car instead of only twelve reels as formerly, thus reducing the shipping expenses appreciably.

Breakage and wastage is largely eliminated; the structure is solid, reliable and easily assembled and taken apart. It re-' members to form a spool shaped collapsible reel for storing and for shipping cables.

Another object relates to assembling each of the flanges of a plurality of interchangeable sections to form a reinforced ring-shaped structure. 4

A further object has to do with the provision ofimounting the metal flanges on the tubular metal barrel body solely by means of radially extending bolts.

'Still another object is concerned with the provision of a brace and spacing member located centrally within the tubular central body for circularly bracing the structure of the barrel and for simplifying its assembly.

Another object has to do with the provision of end closures for removable central attachment to the barrel body at each end.

A further object resides in the provision of axially disposed peripheral rim extensions integral with the sectional flange members, and the provision of peripheral openings'in said rim extensions for receiving and for holding suitable lagging bars across the flanges for covering the cable disposed on the central barrel body between the flanges.

Still another object has to do with disposing the openings in certain of the flange sections, in one embodiment, in such a manner as do with provisions for locking the lagging bars collectively on the reel flanges.

Another object, in connection with acertain embodiment of the invention, is concerned with sectional movable collective locking provisions for the lagging bars.

A further object relates to the provision of a cross bar assembly holding a bearing bracket and attachable at each end of the tubular barrel body in radial cooperation with the lateral metal flange sections and centrally in the end closures.

Another object is concerned with the provision of lagging bars, each provided with key members for engaging the openings in the flanges to cover the cable disposed within the flanges on the tubular barrel body.

Other objects not specifically noted above will appear from the following detailed description furnished with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure 1 represents a perspective view of one embodiment of the invention showing an assembled reel with some of the lagging bars attached and with certain parts broken away in order to illustrate details;

Figure 2 illustrates the collapsible barrel body, with parts broken away in order to show the bracing and spacing disk located within the barrel when assembled;

Figure 3 shows an end closure for attachment to the barrel body;

Figure 4 is a transversal cross section of the end closure shown in Figure 3;

Figure 5 shows a single section of the lateral flange attached to the barrel member;

Figure 6 is a reinforcing part cooperating with the section of the flange shown in Figure 5 Figure 7 shows the bearing plate, used in connection with one modification of the reel;

Figure 8 illustrates a cross section of the completely assembled reel;

Figure 9 represents an end View of the assembled reel;

Figure 10 shows the key used in connection with the lagging bars;

Figure 11 is a side view and a cross section, respect vely, of a lagging bar used with one embodiment of the invention;

' Figure 12- shows a fragmentary side view and a cross section, respectively,'of a blank lagging bar; 7

Figure 13 illustrates the manner in which the lagging bars may be bundled for shipment or storage;

Figure 14 shows the manner in which the collapsed barrel may be arranged for shipment Figure 15 represents a fragmentary perspective view of a reel showing differently disposed openings for attaching the lagging bars endwise and for locking them collectively on the reel by means of a suitable ring attached to one of the flanges;

Figure 16 illustrates a modified form of lagging bar in side view and an end view, respectively K Figure 17 shows a modification of a sectional collective locking ring for locking the lagging bars endwise;

Figure 18 is a further modification showing how the locking ring may be secured against radial displacement on the flange;

Figures 19 and 20 illustrate still another modification of a sectional collective locking ring for the lagging bars, Figure 19 showing the sections of the locking rin'g in disengaged position, and Figure 20 in engaged position;

Figure 21 is a modification of the cover. laggings, being 'made of sections of curved metal bodies provided with keys for engaging the openings on th flanges; and

Figure 22 illustrates a side View of the metal cover shown in Figure 21.

Referring now to Figure 1, this figure represents one embodiment of the assembled reel with some of the lagging bars attached thereto. It will be understood, of course, that the lagging bars have been shown in this. figure attached to the flanges of the reel merely for illustrative purposes. In practice, these lagging bars will be attached only when the cable is disposed on the barrel between the flanges, in order to complete the reel for shipment. y

The reel comprises the collapsible barrel body designated by numeral 1. The detailed structure of this barrel body will be described presently. At each end of this tubular barrel body is attached a recessed end closure, each having a laterally extending flange such as shown at 5 in connection with the end closure 4. Each of the laterally extendin flanges or heads 2 and 3 is constructed 0 eight sections. These sections are designated by reference numerals 12 to 19, inclusive, in connection with the flange 3', the flange 2 being large 1y concealed in this figure and showing only the sections 20 to23, inclusive. Each of these flange sections comprises a suitable tray structure having a reinforcing insert comprising a channel shaped rim section, such as the one designated by numeral 25 shown in connection with the flange section 19 of flange 3, side members 35 and 36, and bracket members 37 and 38. The flange section designated by the numeral 12 comprises again the external tray section mentioned before and the 'reinforcinginsert having a channel member ence numerals 47, LB-and 49 the bolts holding the sections 19 and 18 beingdesignated by reference numerals 50, 51and52, while two bolts 53 and 54 are shown in Figure 1 as fastening together the sections 18 and 17.

When this sectional ring shaped flange structure is assembled as intimated above, it

is attached exteriorly to the end of the tubular barrel member 1. There are radially extending openings in the bracket extensions 3738, 4142, 4546, etc., and corresponding openings in the flange section holding the reinforcing inserts of which these bracket extensions form a part, and these openings are lined up with corresponding openings in the tubular barrel members when the sectional flange is attached thereto. An end closure such as the closure 4 having a laterally extending rim 5 is then inserted into the tubular barrel member 1. The closure is provided with radially extending openings corresponding to the openings in the barrel memher and in the various flange sections as mentioned. The openin s are lined up radially and the structure is then completed by inserting radially extending bolls at each end of the barrel member 1, and by fastening these bolts in place by means of nuts such as 55 to 60, inclusive.

Laterally extending, channel shaped reinforcing bars such as the bars 7 and 8 may be attached within the recessed portion of the end closure, as is shown in connection with the closure 4. These bars extend transversely throughout the recessed portion of the end closure and may be. fastened by means of nuts and bolts 6162 and 63-64. A beartral opening 10 may be attached to the reinforcing bars 7 and 8 by means of nuts and bolts as indicated by reference numerals: 65 to 68 inclusive. Corresponding reinforcing bars may be attached on the other side of the end closure, in the interior of the barrel 1, displaced radially of the bars 7 and 8 by ninety degrees. It will be understood, of course, that the end closure attached to the other end of the barrel is also provided w th a centrally located opening in register with v the opening 10 of the bearing plate 9 for receiving a shaft to support the'reel rotatably when it is desired. It will also be understood that reinforcing bars as discussed in connection with the right hand side of the reel are also provided on the left hand side and disposed within the recessed end closure in the same manner.

The axially extending exterior rim of each of the flanges 2 and 3 is provided with suitable key openings, such as 6970 and 71-72. The purpose of these key openings is to receive headed locking keys or studs attached to the lagging bars 11. as will be described in detail later. It may be mentioned at this point, however, that the headed keys or studs in the lagging bars 11 are slipped "into the horizontally extending portion of the T- shaped openings on the rim of the flanges and then moved circularly along the flanges to look behind the vertically extending portion of the T-shaped openin s. It will be observed that the direction 0 the'T-shaped openings provided on the flange sections 20 and 12 is reversed relative to the openings for engagement with the openings designated by numerals 6 and 6'. This blank lagging bar is therefore merely a spacer strip and can be readily removed since it is not locked to the flanges. There may be several such blank laggings provided on the reel, each marked by a certain color to denotethe places where removal of the lagging bars may be started. These blanks are connected and held in place by means of circularly attached steel tapes nailed to the blanks and holding the same in place on the flanges, thereby sealing the reel for shipment. Since stresses imposed on the other lagging bars cannot dislodge the bars due to the locking. arrangement of thesebars, and since the blanks are securely held by the steel tapes, it is apparent that removal of moving the blanks and then sliding the other 1 bars out of engagement with the flanges. ing plate such as shown at 9, having a cen-.

Vhen it is desired to collapse the reel for shipment, the lagging bars are removed from the flanges as described above, and the radially extending bolts suclr as 55 to 64, inclusive, are then removed. The flange 3 is then slipped axially from the tubular barrel 1.

Since the flange 5 of the end closure 4 extends laterally beyond and overlaps the inner circle of the sectional ring shaped flange 3, the closure 4 will be removed wit-h the flange 3. The other flange 2 is removed from the tubular barrel in the same manner and the barrel will then collapse.

The lagging bars are suitably bundled in a; manner which will be described. presently, and the individual parts of the reel, that is to say, the ring shaped sectional flanges, the end closures and the collapsed barrel will be shipped by arranging them suitably in a car in a manner consuming less space than the usual structures of reels which are not collapneoaass the barrel. The assembly of the barrel is simple, requiring only a suitable mounting block to support the lower section of the barrel designated by numeral 74. ,The disk 79 is then put in place within this section 74, by slipping the same in place between the brackets such as 77 and 78. It will be understood, of course, that there are oppositely located companion brackets for supporting the disk 79 against axial displacement within the barrel. The upper section 73 is then simply joined to the lower section 74, the brackets 76 and and their oppositely located companion brackets holding the spacer disk 79 in place.

The recessed end closure is shown in a perspective view in Figure 3 and in a transversal cross section in Figure 4. llt will be seen that this closure has a recessed portion 06 and a laterally extending flange 97. A central opening 98 is provided in this end closure, which, when the closure is attached to the tubular barrel shown in Figure 2, will register with the centrally located opening 146 provided in the spacer disk 79. ltadially extending openings such as 99 are provided in the end closure which may be brought in register with the corresponding openings at the end of the tubular barrel members where the openings are designated by reference numerals to 95, inclusive. lt is, of course, understood that there are two such end closures provided, and that this closure, as shown in Figures 3 and 1, may correspond to the closure designatedby numeral 4 shown in Figure 1, or to the closure at the other end of the barrel.

The structure of the lateral flanges such as 2 and 3 shown in Figure l, is more particularly illustrated in the Figures 5 and 6 which I will now describe.

Each of the flanges, as noted previously, comprises a plurality of sections assembled to form a ring shaped structure. Each section of this structure is composed of a tray like frame member such as the one shown in Figure 5. This frame is, of course, of metal and comprises two oppositely located curved sections 100 and 107 joined by the side walls 102 and 103. Openings such as 104:, 105 and 106 are provided in the side walls 102 and 103 for joining the various sections to form the ring shapedflange. Radially extending openings 108 and109 are provided in-the curved wall portion 107 for fastening the isscmbled flange to the tubular barrel mem- The reinforcing detail illustrated-in Figure 6 serves a double purpose. contributes to strengthening the structure of each sec tion of the flange, and in addition provides a channel structure closing the openings 101 iirtlie rim of the frame shown in Figure 5 interiorly in order to prevent damage to the cable or injury to workmen in case one of the keys or studs attached to the lagging bars, which are slipped into the openings 101, should accidentally separate from a lagging bar. It will be caught in the channel shaped structure 110 and may be conveniently removed through one of the openings 101. The arms 111 and 112 of the structure shown in Figure 6 are rovided with suitable holes 115, 116 and 11 which, when this part is inserted into the ,frame shownin Figure 5, will register with the holes 104, 105 and 106 in the side walls of the frame. The bracket extensions 113 and 114 are provided with openings 118 and 119 which will register with the corresponding openings 108-109 in the curved frame wall shown in Figure 5 and designated by numeral 107.

' The channel shaped reinforcing structure shown in Figure 6 is inserted into the frame structure shown in Figure 5, with the various openings in register, which completes a section of the flange. Fight such sections,

completely assembled, are now joined to form the ring shaped flange as illustrated in Figure 1. When the flange is completely assembled, it is attached to the assembled tubular barrel body shown in Figure 2, with the radially extending openings registering with the openings at the end of the barrel members, designated in Figure 2 by numerals 80 to 95, inclusive. The end closure illustrated in Figures 3 and 4 is then put in place, with the recessed portion 96 inserted into the barrel and with the openings 99 also in register with the holes 80 to 95, inclusive, in the barrel member. Suitable bolts are then radially inserted through the sixteen radial holes and fastened by suitable boltsand nuts, such as 55 to 64, inclusive, as indicated in Figure 1. The essential parts of the reel are now joined to term a unitary structure. lit may be remarked at this point, that the disk 79, shown in Figure 2, does not primarily serve the purpose of bracing and of reinforcing the tubular barrel member, but rather to simplify the assembly of the barrel. members it is, of course, understood that this spacer disk 79 may be made of sutficient strength to serve as a support for the barrel member if desired; Likewise, the channel shaped cross. bars land 8 shown in Figure 1 as inserted into the recessed portion of the end closure 4 may not be absolutely necessary for supporting the reel structure. Their use is optional.

Tn Figures 8 and 9, l have shown a cross section and a more diagrammatic end view of the completely assembled reel. The spacer disk 79 is shown in Figure 8 supported between the brackets 76-76', 7575, 7777 and 7878'. These brackets are permanently attached to the respective sections of the tubular barrel designated in this figure by numerals 73 and 74. They hold the spacer closures engaging the tubular barrel interiorly, and the lateral flanges 97 and 97' of the end closures 96 and 96, respectively, overlapping the ends of the tubular barrel and also the inner circle of theassembled flanges 2 and 3. The attachment of the end closures and the flanges 2 and 3 to the ends of the tubular barrel is by means of the radially extending bolts such as indicated at 124, 126, 128 and 130, which are fastened by means of the nuts 125, 127, 129 and 131. It will, of course, be understood, that the bolts and nuts above mentioned, correspond to the fastening of the assembly as indicated in Figure 1 by different reference numerals, i. e., by reference numerals to 64, inclusive.

Exteriorly, but disposed within the recessed portions of the end closure 96 are the reinforcing channel shapedcross bars 178-132. Within the recessed portion of closure 96 are similar cross bars, one being shown at 138. Other cross bars, such as 141-140 and 134-135 are disposed within the interior of the tubular barrel member and attached to the end closure, respectively, by means of bolts and nuts such as 136, 137, 184 and 87 holding the cross supporting bar attached to the end closure 96and also holding the bearing plate 133 to this end closure, as particularly seen in the end view of the a. assembly shown in Figure 9.

v The bearing plates 133 and 139.are suitably shaped plates each provided with a centrally located opening 148 and 144, respectively, and with suitable mounting openings, such as 149 to 152, inclusive, for receiving the bolts 136-137, 184-187, as shown in Figure 9. The plate is particularly shown in Figure 7. The left hand side of the assembly shown in Figure 8 is, of course, also provided with suitable cross supporting bars and with a bearing plate 139. There is now anaxial opening defined by the openings 144, 145, 146, 147 and 148, in the two bearing plates 133 and 139, in the recessed portions of the end closures 96 and 96' and in the spacer disk 79. The assembly can be supported rotatably on a shaft extending throughthese centrally extendin opening? As s own in igure 9, the circular assembly of the ring shaped sectional flange, comrisin the eight sections, such as designated by reference numerals 161 to 168, inclusive, is accomplished by fastening these sections by means of bolts or rivets such as indicated by reference numerals 169 to 174, inclusive. The attachment of the completely assembled flange to the tubular barrel member is indicated in Fi ure 9 by means of bolts such as The sectional rim channel on the flanges is shown in Figure 8 at 120', 121, 122'-and 123. The purpose of this channel, as has been remarked previously, is to prevent the loss of a locking key or stud separated from a lagging bar, thereby preventing damage.

In Figure 10 is shown the locking key for attachment to a lagging bar. The key has preferably a rectangular head 155, a shank 153 and a threaded portion 154.

Figure 11 illustrates an embodiment of a lagging bar 158 provided with two locking keys 156 and 157. Lagging bars as the one shown in this figure, are attached peripherally to the flanges of the reel, by inserting the heads of the ke s into the T-shaped openings provided on t e periphery. u The lagging bars are then slipped circularly in place on the flanges, with the shanks of the keys engaging the legs of the T-shaped openings and the heads locking in the flange sections. It will be understood that this method of fastening the lagging bars to the flanges provides for secure attachment of the lagging bars in place of the flanges which, as far as I am aware, is new in the art and presents obvious advantages.

The lagging bar 159, shown in Figure 12, provided with a circular stud 160 is a blank for insertion at certain spaces around the circumference of the flanges as was explained previously.

A steel tape may be wrapped peripherally around the agging bars and attached to the blank or blanks for holding the lagging bars in place. The blank laggmg bars, such as the one shown in Figure 12, may be designated conspicuously by a certain color sothat the attention of the workmen is called to removing the blank lagging bars first before removing the keyed lagging bars. The steel tape may be provided. with a seal guarding the reel against unauthorized opening.

In Figure 13 is shown the manner in which the lagging bars may be bundled for shipment, and which will be understood without elaborate description. Steel tape or wire 199 may be used for securing the lagging bars as shown, the ends of the wire or steel tape 199 being secured at 200.

The collapsed sectionsof the tubular barrel may be arranged for shipment as shown particularly in Figure 14. As shown in this figure, two sections of a collapsed barrel. 188 and 189, each having the spacer brackets 190-193,-194-196, respectively, are preferably shipped standing up and te'escoped into each other as shown.

A modified arrangement of attaching the lagging bars is illustrated in Figure 15 which shows a fragmentary view of a reel comprising a barrel 203 and two lateral flanges 20l and 202. These flanges may be constructed in a similar manner as was discussed in con nection with Figure 1, consisting of several Figure 16.

sections asindicated. The openings in the flanges are again T-shaped but extend axially instead of radially tothe drum.

The lagging bars used in connection with this modification are provided with keys such as 204 and 205, as is particularly shown in These laggings, marked in Figure 15 by numerals 206 and 207, are slipped in place endwise, with the keys or studs engaging the T-shaped slots. The lagging bars are thus secured against displacement radially to the reel and in one direction also against movement axially to the reel. A ring, such as 208 may then be attached to one of the flanges by means of suitable elongated openings 209 and 210, engaging bolts on this flange, and finally secured in place by suitable nuts such as 211 and 212.

The advantage of this arrangement is in uniform structure of the lagging bars, since blanks are eliminated; in uniform structure which in the first described embodiment is required. A further advantage lies in the fact that the reel may be opened, i. e., the removal or" the lagging bars may be started at any point after removal of the collecting holding ring 208. A padlock or other seal may be provided for holding the ringin locked position against unauthorized removal.

This ring, as is shown in Figurel'l, may be made of sections, such as 213 to 220, inclusive, each provided with openings such as 221222, 223-224, 225226, etc., 235236. These sections are preferabfy made of resilient material and successively slipped in place, with the openings engaging suitable stationary headed studs on the flanges. The

last section due to being resilient will bend andslip into place over the first section. All sections are now locked in place and securely lock the lagging bars. When removal of the lagging bars is desired, any one of theresilient ring sections may be removed by s mply prying its end over the end of the adJacent section and then moving the same circularly out of engagement.

Such a locking ring as shown in Flgure 15, which is secured by means of nuts or bolts grovided either stationary or inserted loosely-in the flange, may be found inconvenient due to the necessity of first removing the nuts before the ring can be removed, although, it may be mentioned, this is appreciably simpler than other methods of securing the laggings. The arrangement can be further simplified, however, by adopting the locking provision shown in Figure 18, which requires only headed bolts attached to the flange, and a ring having slots such as 237 for engaging these headed bolts. The ring is locked by a latch 238 fastened on a bracket 239 and provided with a spring 240. The latch member is adapted to engage suitable steps in the ring. and to lock the same with the headed bolts engaging the openings such as 237.

It is also contemplated to provide, in one modification, as shown in Figures 19 and 20, a sectional ring the sections of which may always remain on the flange. Each section of this ring is provided with angular slots such as 242 to 245, inclusive. With the lagging bars removed from the flanges, the sections-are positioned as shown in Figure 19, attached to the flange by means of suitable bolts and nuts 246 to 249, inclusive.

When the laggingbars are attached and it is desired to lock them in place against displacement, each of the sections of the locking ring will be moved radially to overlap the ends of some of the laggings, and then laterally, so that the bolts in the flanges engage the other end of the angular slots as shown in Figure 20. The nuts 246-249 are then tightened on the bolts, securing the sections of the-ring in position. Numerals 250 and 251 in Figure 20 indicate theflange and the laggings, respectively, with the locking ring sections in locking position.

It will be understood that a padlock may be provided inconnection with any of the locking rings which I have shown, so that only an authorized agent can gain access to the cable on the reel;

It may be desirable in certain cases, to provide large curved plates of metal for covering the storage space on a cable in preference to using lagging bars. Such cover plate is illustrated in Figures 21 and 22, respectively.

It may be attached to the flanges similarly to the attachment described in connection with the lagging bars, by means of suitable locking keys or studs such as 252 and 253 shown on the plate in these figures.

It will be apparent that the use of metal cover plates as shown in Figures 21 and 22, or the use of lagging bars as previously ex plained isoptional. Either the one or the other may be used alternately if desired, for protecting a shipment of cable secured on my novel reel. i

It will be seen from the foregoing that the collapsible assembled=metal reel and the novel method of attaching the lagging bars, as described, represents a radical departure from current methods of cable reel construction and protection of the cable. It incorporates numerous advantages and novel structural and functional features which will be appreciated by the trade as an advance in the art of making such reels and. of protecting cables.

It will also be readily understood that the invention may be modified in .parts or as a whole and adapted to serve a variety of pur poses other than explained but inherently residing in its teachings. Therefore, al-

though I: have shown and described certain structural embodiments of the invention for purposes of illustration, it will be understood that I do not wish to be limited in applying the invention precisely as shown, but that I intend to utilize and exploit the same in all variations and embodiments which fall within the scope of the following claims.

I claim as my invention:

1. A cable reel, having a tubular cable support comprising a plurality of longitudinal radially joined sections, closures, flanges, and means for removably mounting a closure and a flange at each end of said support, comprising bolts each passing through aligned openings in a section, a closure and a flange.

2. A cable reel, having a tubular support comprising a plurality of sections, a disk centrally disposed within said sections, means permanently disposed within'said sections for holding said disk against axial displacement,and laterally extending flange means peripherally attached at each end of said support for securing said sections in assembly.

3. A cable reel structure, having a plurality of radially assembled longitudinal sections forming a tubular central body, a disk disposed centrally within said body, means for securing said disk against axial displacement'within said body, flange means removably attached at eachend of said body for securing said sections against radial displacement and for defining the attachment of said reel, and centrally disposed openings in said disk and in said flange means for receivin a biiaring shaft for movably supporting sai( roe 4. A reel for supporting cables, having a collapsible tubular central portion comprising a plurality of sections, recessed end plates, substantially ring shaped assembled flanges comprising a plurality of interchangeable sections, and means for removably joining an end plate and a flange to each end of said central portion to form said reel and to hold the sections of said central portion in assembly.

'5. A reel for supporting cables, having a collapsible tubular central portion comprising a plurality of sectiouns, recessed end plates, substantially ring shaped assembled flanges comprising a iplurality of interchangeable sections, means for removably and laterally joining an end plate and a flange laterally to each end of said central portion to form said rerl and to hold the sections of said central portion in assembly, a spacer disk disposed ccntrallywithin said central portion, and centrally disposed openings in said disk and in said end plates for receiving a bearing shaft for rotatably mounting said reel.

6. A metal reel for supporting cables, having a collapsible tubular central body, end

' plates within the tubular body at the end thereof, substantially rifig shaped flanges on the outer side of the tubular body, means for removably attaching an end plate and a flange laterall to each end of said body to form said reel: axially disposed peripheral extensions on each of said flanges and integral therewith, openings circularly arranged in said eripheral extensions, a plurality of cross ars, and means on each of said cross bars for securing the same across said flanges by means of said openings.

7. A metal reel for supporting cables, having a plurality of central sections disposed to form a collapsible tubular central body, a spacer disk disposed centrally within said body, means for holding said disk against axial displacement within said body, a circularly recessed closure provided with a lateral flange disposed at each end of said bod for closing the ends thereof, a ring shaped ange of substantially channel shaped cross section dis osed peripherally at each end of said recessed closure laterally with said body at each end thereof for holding said central sections in assembly, and central openings in said spacer disk and in said recessed closures for receiving a bearing shaft for rotatably mounting said reel when assembled.

8. A metal cable reel, having a plurality of central sections disposed to form a collapsible tubular central body, a spacer disk disposed centrally within said body, means for holding said disk against axial displacement Within said body, a circularly recessed closure provided with a lateral flange disposed at each end of said body for closing the ends thereof a ring shaped flange of substantially channe shaped cross section disposed peripherally at each end of said body, means for joining said flange and said recessed closure later-all with said body at each end thereof for olding said central sections in assembly, central openings in said spacer disk and in said recessed closures for receiving a bearing shaft for rotatably mounting said reel when assembled, a plurality of open-. ings peripherally disposed on each of said ring shaped flanges, a plurality of cross bars for attachment to said flan es across the width defined by said central ody, and looking means on each of said cross bars for engaging said peripheral openings on said flanges.

9. A metal cable reel, having a plurality of central sections disposed to form a collapsible tubular central body, a spacer disk disposed centrally within said body, means for olding said disk against axial displacement within said body, a circularly recessed closure provided with a lateral flange disposed at each end of said body for closing the ends thereof, a ring shaped flange of substantially channel shaped cross section disposed peripherally at each end of said body, said neoaeee changeable sections, a substantially channel shaped reinforcing member attached to each of said flange sections,means for joining said flange und said recessed closure laterally with said body at each end thereof for holding said central sections in assembly, central openings in said spacer disk and in said recessed closures for receiving a bearing shaft for rotatably mounting said reel when assembled, a plurality of openings peripherally disposed on each of said ring shaped flanges, and a plurality of cross bars for attachment to said openings in said flanges across the width defined by said central body.

10. In a cable reel, a tubular central body, a flange member dis osed laterally at each end or said body do ning the axial storage space of said reel, a circularly extending sectional channel provided peripherally on said flanges and having a plurality of peripheral openings, cross bars for peripheral attachment to said flanges to close said storage space, a plurality of locking keys attached to each of said cross bars for engaging said peripheral openings in said flanges and for locking said barsto saidjflanges, a closure attached at each end of said central body, and central openings in each of said closures for receiving a bearing shaft for rotatably supportingsaid reel.

11. In a cable reel, a collapsible tubular .central metal body comprising a plurality of sections, laterally disposed metal flanges defining the axial storage space of said reel, metal end plates closing said body and having openings for-rotatably supporting said reel, a plurality of cross bars for covering said storage space, cooperating means on said cross bars and on said fiangesfor detachablysecuring said cross bars, and means including bolts each extending through a hole in a flange, a hole in a section of the body portion and a hole in an end plate for securing said flanges and said end plates to said central body to secure said body against collapsing.

12. In a cable reel structure bomprising a drum portion and end flanges defining the storage space of said reel, lagging bars for periphcral'attachment to said flanges to close said storage space, means including T-shaped openings on said flanges for locking said laggings individually against displacement in one direction, and means for collectively locking said lagging bars against displacement in another direction.

13. In a cable reel structure comprising a drum portion and end flanges defining the storage space of said reel, cross bars for peripheral attachment to said flanges to close said storage space, cooperating means on said cross bars and on said flanges for locking said cross bars individually in place, and means on one of said flanges cooperating with said cross bars for lockin said cross bars I collectively in place on said flanges.

it. A reel including a sheet metal drum supported between a pair ot'head members at the opposite ends each head member comprising an annulus having an outwardly extending flange along its inner periphery and fitting over the end of the drum, a separate ring within the drum at the end thereof, and bolts extending radially of the reel through the fldnge, the drum; and the'ring for secur= ing the parts together.

15. A reel including a sheet metal drum Ell supported between a pair of head mebers at the opposite ends each head member comprising an annulus having an outwardly ex= tending flange along its inner periphery and fitting over the end of the drum, a separate ring within the drum at the end thereof, and bolts extending radially of the reel through the flange, the drum and the ring for securing the parts together, the drum being imperiorate along the portion of its cylindrical sur= face between the head members and comprising a plurality of separate sections in abutment with one another.

In witness whereof, ll hereunto subscribe of June 1930.

lllEB

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3059763 *Mar 17, 1958Oct 23, 1962Stephen L EifridReel assembly and method of constructing same
US5002237 *Nov 28, 1989Mar 26, 1991Victor Company Of Japan, Ltd.Removable tape reel assembly system for a magnetic tape cassette
US5417384 *Mar 25, 1992May 23, 1995Ulvator AbTool for mounting to a parcel containing a coil of a continuous, flexible object
US5971317 *Dec 18, 1998Oct 26, 1999Creative Techniques, Inc.Warp resistant molded plastic reel
US6260502Feb 8, 1999Jul 17, 2001Owen KratzSemi-submersible vessel
US8608102Oct 18, 2010Dec 17, 2013Sonoco Development, Inc.Modular reel structure
US8820671Sep 30, 2013Sep 2, 2014Southwire Company, LlcReel assemblies with customizable and interchangeable drums
DE1031857B *Dec 3, 1955Jun 12, 1958Ind Nachf Seifert & Co K GKabeltrommel
EP1834915A1 *Mar 8, 2007Sep 19, 2007Efsa S.A.Metal winding coil for a cable, tube or similar
WO1997008091A1 *Nov 30, 1995Mar 6, 1997Santarelli BrunoReel for cables etc.
WO2011059637A1Oct 18, 2010May 19, 2011Sonoco Development, Inc.Modular reel structure
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/399, 242/608.4, 242/607, 242/601
International ClassificationB65H75/22, B65H75/04, B65H75/18, B65H75/14
Cooperative ClassificationB65H75/22, B65H2701/51344, B65H75/141
European ClassificationB65H75/14B, B65H75/22