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Publication numberUS1906296 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 2, 1933
Filing dateNov 29, 1930
Priority dateNov 29, 1930
Publication numberUS 1906296 A, US 1906296A, US-A-1906296, US1906296 A, US1906296A
InventorsWilliams Edward T
Original AssigneeWilliams Edward T
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Evaporator
US 1906296 A
Images(5)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

n E. T. WILLIAMS May 2, 1933.

EVAPORATOR Filed Nov. 29, 1930 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 @gan/QQ I A TTORNEY May 2, 1933- l E. T. ywlLLlM/s 1,906,296

EVAPORATOR Filed Nov. 29, 195o 5 sheets-sheet 2.

2 /z0.3. /f ZZ f t t y 140 23 l lo@ K '2a Ha l I y INVENTOR.

May 2., 1933- E. T, WILLIAMS EVAPORATOR Filed Nov. 29, 1930q 5 Sheets-Sheet, 5

A TTGRNEY May 2, 1933.

E. TQ WILLIAMS EVAPORATOR Filed Nov. 29, 1930 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENToR.

/ ATTORNEY Patented May 2, 1933 PATENT OFFICE EDWARD T. WILLIAMS, OF NEW ROCHELLE, NEW YORK EVAPOR-ATOR Application led November 29, 1930.

This invention relates to evaporators for refrigerators and more particularly to evaporators formed of pressed or stamped sheet metal.

Heretofore evaporators for cooling thestorage compartments of refrigerators have been constructed to occupy a greater amount of space than necessary and have had relatively larUe substantially inactive portions, i. e., sur aces not in contact with liquid refrigerant, for example, evaporators have been constructed with headers disposed exteriorly of the sharp freezing chambers with their major portions not in Contact with the liquid refrigerant and consequently of practically negligible heat transferring capacity.

It is an object of the present invention to provide an improved evaporator of simple, inexpensive and compact construction, which occupies less space Within the refrigerator cabinet for a given capacity, has all of the interior and substantially all of the exterior wall of the evaporator in Contact with the liquid refrigerant, and the major portion or the main body of the liquid held in a trap which is exposed to the fast freezing chamber.

In this type of evaporator, as usually constructed, a cylindrical header is formed above the sloping upper walls; the triangular interior space formed thereby has heretofore been unusable and therefore'waste space. The construction disclosed herein not only makes use of this otherwise waste space but brings the active surface of the evaporator in closer proximity to the water or other matter to be frozen, thus materially shortening the freezing time with corresponding evaporator efficiency.

Further objects and advantages will be apparent from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings wherein Fig. 1 is a front elevation with parts broken away illustrating one application of the invention;

-Fig. 2 is a side elevation with parts broken away;

Fig. 3, a rear elevation with parts broken away of a modified construction;

Serial No. 498,977.

Fig. 4, a section on the line 4-4 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5, a rear end elevationwith parts broken away showing a further modified form of the invention;

Fig. 6, a section on the line 6-6 of Fig. 5; 55

Fig. 7, a section on the line 7 7 of Fig. 5;

Fig. 8, a fragmentary longitudinal sect-ion illustrating a modified construction;

Fig. 9, a section on line 9-9 of Fig. 8;

Fig. 10, a fragmentary longitudinal sec- G0 tion of a further modified construction;

Fig. 11, a section on the line 11-:11 of Fig. 10;

Fig. 12, a fragmentary longitudinal section of a further modified construction;

Fig. 13, a section on the line 13-13 of Fig. 12; i

Fig. 14, a fragmentary longitudinal section of a further modified construction; and

Fig. 15, a section on the line 15-15 of Fig. 14.

Referring to the drawings, the evaporator comprises an inner shell 10 and an outer shell 11, the inner shell being preferably 75 formed of sheet metal pressed into the required shape and united longitudinally, for example, along the center of the bottom of the same, by welding or by any other desired means. The inner shell is also proso vided with shelf supports 12 pressed in the metal for supporting shelves 13. At. the top the shell is provided along its central line with a longitudinal trough or trapA 14.

The outer shell 11 is slightly larger than 85 the inner shell and is provided with indenta tions 15 struck inwardly to space the outer from the inner shell and through which are spot welds for holding the shells together and for reinforcing the evaporator. This 9o outer shell is likewise preferably formed of sheet metal and is welded longitudinally, for example, along the bottom. The front and rear ends of the inner and outer sections are welded together to form a gas tight joint and a closure plate may be provided at the rear ends of the shells to close one end of the sharp freezing chamber if desired. The invention as above described is not limited to the formation of indentations in the outer shell alone, but the same may be formed in either or both shells and the expression indentations includes line welds. The substantially cylindrical chamber formed by the trap 14 is also closed at its front end and the rear end is provided with an outlet connection 16 for refrigerant vapor. The refrigerant liquid is admitted through pipe 17 to the space between the inner and outer shells at the bottom.

The substantially cylindrical trough or trap 14 is provided with connections 18 at each side which join'the inclined portion of the inner shell, such connections being provided with traps 19 which permit liquid. to flow from the trough or trap 14 outward ly to the space between the shells but prevent vapor from flowing therethrough in an opposite direction into the trap 14. The inner and outer shells are inclined at the top to provide a compact structure and yet permit the location of the trough or trap 14 at a suiiicient height not to interfere with ice trays resting upon the shelves. The two sections being welded together in the manner described are substantially strengthened to resist internal pressure. Battle plates 2O of substantially L-shaped construction as shown are provided secured to the outer shell 11 longitudinally above the trough in order to establish a shielded zone around the outlet from the evaporator. These baffles may be carried by a p'lug as shown in Figs. 8 and 9, which fits into the end to which the suction line is attached.

In operation, refrigerant in liquid form will be delivered through the tube 17 to the space between the shells of the evaporator and will flow upwardly until it reaches a substantial height within the trough or trap 14 and on being heatedl will be vaporized and sucked back to the compressor of the refrigerating unit from the return line 16, thus producing the refrigerating effect. In this arrangement the liquid will circulate rapidly and to prevent its being carried over into the suction line the baffles are so located as to deflect the liquid downwardly into the trap and allow the vapor freed from liquid to pass into the suction line.

The structure of Figs. 3 and 4 corresponds to that of Figs. 1 and 2 and includes inner and outer shells 10a. and 11a, which are of similar construction to the shells of Fig. 1. However, the inner shell 10m is provided with indentations 25, formed in the outer shell, and also the inner shell is provided with transverse depressions 21 formed between upstanding bosses 22, such transverse depressions permitting the refrigerant to How from the trough 14a into the space bctween the shells when a sufficient quantity has accumulated. As shown in these figures, 'the evaporator may be provided with a closure plate 23 for one end of the trap which terminates in a horizontal line along the front of the evaporator and serves to conceal said trap. Any desired means may be provided for securing the evaporator in place, for example threaded studs 24, of which three in number are shown.

In Figs. 5 and 6 is shown an evaporator like that of Figs. 3 and 4 with the addition of a shelf 26 which forms upper and lower freezing compartments and with the inner shell 10b disposed along the bottom of the trap 14?) and extended downwardly to provide a refrigerated partition formed by the depending plates 27, between which liquid refrigerant will be maintained. The plates 27 are provided with contacting portions 28 which serve as welding pointsl for securing the plates together. The inner shell is provided with shelf-supporting ledges 12b as in the previous embodiments of the invention. The plates 27 are welded or otherwise secured around their edges and the lower horizontal edges of the inner shell may be fastened to the shelf 26 as shown, thus divid ing the upper compartment into two separate compartments.

In Figs. 8, 9, 10 and 11 are shown structures' similar to that of Fig. 5, the depending plates 27 of which are stamped to provide a plurality of loops 28 and 29, the loops 28 being concentric and the loops 29 being parallel. Also in Figs. 8 and 9 a plug 30 is provided which closes the end of the trap and such plug carries the baffles -20 and suction line 16.

In Figs. 12 to 14 are shown structures similar to the structure of Fig. 5 with the addition of loops 31 and 32 which are disposed between the depending opposed plates 27 and define passages for refrigerant, the loops 31 being arranged concentrically like the arrangement of the loops stamped in the metal as shown in Figs. 8 and 9 and the loops 32 being arranged in parallel relation like the loops pressed in the metal as shown in Figs. 10 and 11.

It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that various other changes may be made in the construction and arrangement Without departing from the spirit of the invention and therefore the invent-ion is not limited to what is shown in the drawings and described in the specification but only as indicated in the appended claims.

I claim:

1-. An evaporator comprising a pair of sheet metal shells nested together and having a space between the same for the reception of liquid refrigerant, said shells defining a freezing chamber, a trap for the liquid 1 refrigerant wholly within said freezing chamber formed by a depression in the inner shell, and a hollow partition depending from and communicating with said trap.

2. An evaporator comprising a pair of sheet metal shells nested together and having a space between the same for the reception of liquid refrigerant, said shells defining a freezing chamber, the inner shell having its upper portion depressed to form a trap for the liquid refrigerant wholly within the freezing chamber, and a hollow partition depending from and communicating with said trap, said shells being interconnected in a manner to permit circulation of the refrigerant around the inner shell and upwardly in diverging paths from the bottom of the evaporator into said trap.

3. An evaporator comprising a pair of sheet metal shells nested together and having a space for the reception of liquid refrigerant between the saine, said shells defining a freezing chamber, a trap for the liquid refrigerant wholly within said .freezing chamber formed by a depression in the inner shell, a hollow partition depending from and communicating with said trap, and a closure member for one end of the evaporator having its lower edge terminating below said trap.

4. An evaporator comprising a pair of sheet metal shells nested together and having a space between the same for the reception of liquid refrigerant, said shells defining a freezing chamber, the inner shell having a portion extended inwardly and forming a trap for the liquid refrigerant wholly within said freezing chamber, and substantially horizontal connections between said trap and the adjacent space between the shells.

5. An evaporator comprising inner and outer shells closed at their ends and forming a chamber between the same for the reception of liquid refrigerant, said shells defining a freezing chamber, the inner shell having a depending portion forming a trap for the liquid refrigerant wholly within said freezing chamber, and one or more passages disposed in substantially horizontal position and forming communication between said trap and the adjacent space between the shells for permitting liquidrefrigerant to iiow outwardly from the trap.

6. An evaporator comprising inner and outer shells closed at their ends and forming a chamber between the same for the reception of liquid refrigerant, said shells defining a freezing chamber, the inner shell having a depending portion forming a trap for the liquid refrigerant wholly within said freezing chamber, and one or more passages disposed in substantially horizontal position and forming communication between said trap and the adjacent space between the shells for permitting liquid refrigerant to flow outwardly from the trap, each of said passages being provided with means for preventing the flow of vapor into the trap.

7. An evaporator comprising inner and outer shells closed at their ends and forming a continuous chamber between the same for the rece tion of liquid refrigerant, said shells degning a freezing chamber, a trap for the li uid refrigerant wholly within the freezing c amber formed by a depression in the inner shell, and means connecting said trap below its top with the adjacent space between the shells.

8. An evaporator comprising a pair of sheet metal shells nested together and having a space between the samel for the reception of liquid refrigerant, said shells defining a freezing chamber, the inner shell having a portion extended inwardly and forming a trap for the liquid refrigerant wholly within said freezing chamber, a supply line connected to admit liquid refrigerant into the space between the shells adjacent the bottom of the evaporator, a suction line connected to withdraw refrigerant vapor from the upper portion of said trap, and means for preventing the direct flow of liquid refrigerant into the suction line.

9. An evaporator comprising a pair of sheet metal shells nested together and having a space between the same for the reception of liquid refrigerant, said shells defining freezing chamber, the inner shell havingr a portion extended inwardly and forming a trap for the liquid refrigerant wholly within said freezing chamber, a supply line connected to admit li uid refrigerant into the space between the s ells adjacent the bottom of the evaporator, a suction line connected to withdraw refrigerantvapor from the upper portion of said trap, means for preventing the direct flow of liquid refrigerant into the suction line, and a partition depending from said trap.

10. An evaporator comprising a pair of sheet metal shells nested together and hav-- ing a space between the same for the reception of liquid refrigerant, said shells defining a freezing chamber, a trap for the liquid refrigerant wholly within the freezing chamber formed by a depression in the inner shell, and a partition depending from said trap having a space for liquid refrigerant within the same.

1l. An evaporator comprising aA pair of sheet metal shells nested together and having a space between the same for the reception of liquid refrigerant, said shells defining a freezing chamber, the inner shell having a portion extended inwardly and forming a trap for the liquid refrigerant wholly within said freezing chamber, and a partition depending from said trap and comprising a plurality of loop tubes having communication with the trap.

12. An evaporator comprising inner and outer shells closed at their ends and forming a chamber between the same for the reception of liquid refrigerant, said shells delining a. freezing chamber, the inner shell having a depending portion forming a tra for liquid refrigerant wholly within said reezing chamber, and a artition for said freezing chamber dependmg from said trap, said partition comprising a plurality of loop tubes progressive in size.

13. An evaporator comprising inner and outer shells closed at their ends and forming a chamber between the same for the reception of liquid refrigerant, said shells defining a freezing chamber, the inner shell having a. depending portion forming a trap for liquid refrigerant wholly Within said freezing chamber, and a partit-ion for said freezing chamber depending from said trap, said partition comprising a plurality of loop tubes progressive in size and arranged concentrically.

14. An evaporator comprising inner and outer shells closed at their ends and forming a chamber between the same for the reception of liquid refrigerant, said shells defining a freezing chamber, the inner shell having a depending portion forming atrap for liquid refrigerant wholly Within said freezing chamber, and a partition for said freez ing chamber dependingr from said trap, said partition comprising a plurality of spaced parallel loop tubes.

15. An evaporator Comprising sheet metal shells nested together and having a space between them for the reception of liquid refrigerant, said shells defining a freezing chamber, the inner shell having a portion forming a trap for the liquid refrigerant Wholly Within the freezing chamber, and means providing a plurality of' refrigerant passages depending from said trap and arranged to form a partitionl In testimony whereof I affix my signature.

EDWARD T. WILLIAMS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2595472 *May 3, 1949May 6, 1952Lincoln M LarkinHeat exchanger
US7071439Aug 26, 2004Jul 4, 2006Edward L. GibbsMethod for barrier assembly
US7159853Aug 26, 2004Jan 9, 2007Edward L. GibbsWelded barrier system
US7282659Sep 18, 2003Oct 16, 2007Edward L. GibbsPanel assembly apparatus
US7621510Apr 12, 2005Nov 24, 2009Edward L. GibbsTerrain-adjustable barrier
US7896318Aug 23, 2010Mar 1, 2011Edward L. GibbsTerrain-conforming barrier
US7980534Jul 6, 2007Jul 19, 2011Edward L. GibbsRackable barrier system
US8523150Dec 1, 2004Sep 3, 2013Edward L. GibbsFence with tiltable picket
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/519
International ClassificationF25B39/02
Cooperative ClassificationF25B39/024
European ClassificationF25B39/02B2