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Publication numberUS1906693 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 2, 1933
Filing dateMar 30, 1932
Priority dateMar 30, 1932
Publication numberUS 1906693 A, US 1906693A, US-A-1906693, US1906693 A, US1906693A
InventorsLoughlin Vincent J
Original AssigneeLoughlin Vincent J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tackling dummy
US 1906693 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 2, 1933. v. J. LCUGHLIN TACKLING DUMMY Filed March 50, 1932 .ZZ vE/vTa/r VINCENT J. LOUGHL] N Patented May 2, 1933 GFFI,

VINCENT J. LOUGHLIN, OF KENMORE, NEW YORK TAGKIIING DUMMY Application filed. March 30, 1932. Serial No. 602,970.

My invention relates in general to tackling dummies, and in particular to that type of dummy used in the practice of football.

It is well known to those skilled in the art that the dummies used at present are usually of rigid, one-piece construction, which not only are likely to cause injury to the player, and therefore affect the accuracy and enthusiasm of his play, but which can be used only in one position and can not be placed in the necessary positions to give full and complete instruction and practice in the game of football.

One of the objects of my invention has been to provide a dummy which shall duplicate very closely the physical reactions of the human body when tackled or blocked.

Another object has been to provide adummy so constructed that it may be set up to simulate the position of an opponent in running, standing, or crouching attitudes.

Furthermore, my dummy is so constructed that it can be tackled with all theforce and tactics necessary to use in a regular game, but with little'possibilityof injury to the player.

Moreover, my dummy is so designed that it may be dressed in regular football uniform so that accurate judgment and co-ordination may be taught. My dummy may be dress-ed in the opponents uniform, thereby bringing about a desirable psycho-logical effect upon the player.

The above objects and advantages have been accomplished by the device shown in the accompanying drawing, of which:

Fig. 1 is a front elevation of my device.

Fig. 2 is a side elevation thereof.

Fig. 3 is a rear elevation thereof.

4 shows my dummy in a squatting position.

Fig. 5 is a side elevation of the dummy showing it in a running position.

Fig. 6 is an enlarged, fragmentary, sectional view of my dummy.

My dummy comprises an upper part 10, representing the torso of the human body, and formed with an upper protruding portion 11 to represent the chest-of a player, and with a concave portion 12 which represents the portion lying over the abdomen of the human body. Depending from the upper part are two limb parts 13 of my invention, each separately suspended from the upper part 10. Each limb part comprises a thigh portion 1i and a leg portion 15. The material forming the thigh portions is stitched across at 16 where the knee of the Player is located, whereby a hinge is formed so that the leg portion '15 may be bent to assume various angular positions with the thigh portion 14. r I

The upper part 10 of the dummy is made preferably of fabric, leather, or other suitable material, and is stuffed with cork, saw

dust, or the like. This part of the dummy is provided with a substantially fiat bottom surface20, arranged substantiallyat right angles to the back 17 of the upper part 10. This surface is reinforced and retained in its fiat condition by a numberof slats 18 of semirigid material, such as leather, which extend substantially across the bottom, one ofthem being preferably located at the junction of the back surface 17 with the flat surface 20.

These slats are preferably shorter than the width of the upper part so as not to stiffen the working edges thereof, thus avoiding possible injury to the player. A reinforcing strap 21 engages this surface and is passed i around the upper .part of the dummy, extending up the sides and'over the top where itis provided with a loop 22in which a top ring 23 is disposed. The slats 18 provide a semi-rigid surface forengagement with the strap whereby the upperpart retains its normal shape". The strap is preferably stitched to the material forming the dummy and by meansof the top ring the dummymay be suspended in a vertical standing position (see Figs. 13). Extending diagonally from the front of the upper part 10 to the back 17 thereof, is an oblique strap 24: having its forward portion located preferably between the chest portion 11 and the concave portion 12. This strap may also be stitched, in the position shown, to the material of the torso 10. A back ring 25 is secured to this strap, whereby the dummy may be suspended or held in a crouching or running position, as shown in Figs. 4 and5.

The limb parts 13 are suspended from the upper part 10 of the dummy preferably by means of the material which joins the two parts, and this material extends across the front of the dummy and forms a hinge at 26. Since this hinge is provided only at the front of the dummy, the upper part lOthereof may be swung forwardly and downwardly.

or the limb parts 13 may be swung forwardly and upwardly, as shown in Figs. 4 and 5, which is a characteristicof the human body. However, when the substantially fiat surface 20 is brought into engagement with the upper surfaces of the thigh portions, stops are provided which preventthe upper part or the limb parts from being swung backwardly in relation to each other, which also simulates this characteristic of the human body. j

Thelimb parts 13 are also made ofsuitable flexible material and are stuffed with cork, sawdust, or other material of this nature. The leg parts may be formed their lower ends with slight lateral projections 27 and with a forwardly projecting foot portion 28, whereby shoes may be placed upon the dummy, if desired, together with other clothing. to make it more realistic.

In order, that the dummy may be put into a running position, it is desirable to draw one of the leg portions 15 upwardly, as shown in Fig. 5. In order to hold the leg in this position, I employ a resilientn1ember30 which may be of rubber or a helical spring, and which is attached at one end to a loop 31 secured to the back of the thigh portion 14 and at its lower end to a loop .32 secured to the back of the ankle of the leg portion 14. This resilient member is preferably passed through a loop 33 secured to the lower part of the thigh portion which may be located immediately above the knee.

In some cases it may be desirable to add to the realism of the dummy by supplying arms. In such case a sweater 35, as shown in Fig. 5, may be placed over the upper part 10 of the dummy, the sweater ha ving the lower ends of its sleeves 36 stitched together at 37 and stufied with suitable material. It will be seen that the sleeves of the sweater shown upon the dummy of Fig. 5 when so stuffed will be suspended from the dummy, thus forming arms in realistic manner.

From the foregoing it'will be obvious that my dummy can be placed in the various positions assumed by players in-the game of football, and that owing to its construction, when it is tackled, it will react under such tackle in a manner similar to a human antagonist, and thus give to the player all the realism of the game, as well as enabling the instructor to give very specific andminute instructions, which would otherwise be impossible.

If desired, a flexible strap may be extended down the front of the dummy from the chest portion 11 of the upper part 10 to each of the thigh portions 14, which will serve to prevent the upper part and limb parts from having relative backward swinging movement.

This and other modifications of the details herein shown and-"described may be made without departing from the spirit of my invention or the scope of the appended claims, and I do not, therefore, wish to be limited to the exact embodiment herein shown and described, the form shown being merely a preferred embodiment thereof.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim is: v

' 1. A tackling dummy comprising an upper part, two limb parts, each comprising a thigh portion and a leg portion, loops carried at the rear of. the thigh and leg portions, and resilient means connecting the loops, whereby either leg portion may be drawn up toward the thigh portion.

V 2. A tackling dummy comprising an upper part, two limb parts suspended from the upper part, each comprising a thighportion and a leg portion, hinge means connecting the limb parts with the upper part for permitting the limb parts and upper part to swing forwardly, means for preventing such parts from swinging backwardly in relation to each other, loops carried at the rear of the thigh and leg portions, and resilient means connecting the loops, whereby either leg portion may be drawn up toward the thigh portion. V

3. A tackling dummy comprising an upper part having a lower, substantially flat surface, two separate limb parts, each independently suspended from the upper part, hinge meansextending across only the lower front edge of the upper part and the upper edge of each of the limb parts, each limb part being formed with a surface which coacts with the flat surface of the upper part for preventing such upper part and limb parts from swinging backwardly in relation to each other.

4. tackling dummy comprising an upper part having a lower, substantially flat surface, two separate limb parts, each independently suspended from the upper part, hinge meansextending across only the lower front edge of the upper part and the upper edge of each of the limb parts, each'limb part being formed with a surface which coacts'with the flat surface of the upper part for preventing such upper part and limb parts from swinging backwardly in relation to each other, and means for reinforcing and stiffening the flat surface ofthe upper part. 7

- 5. A tackling dummy comprising an upper part having a lower, substantially fiat surface, two separate limb parts, each independeiitly suspended from the upper part, hinge I I means extending across only the lower front part having a lower, substantially flat suredge of the upper part and the upper edge of each of the limb parts, each limb.part being 1 formed with a surface which coacts with the fiat surface of the upper part for preventing such upper part and limb parts from swinging backwardly in: relation to each other, and

a back ring arranged at the back of the upper i art..

6. A tackling dummy comprising an upper part having a lower, substantially flat sur-; face, two separate limb parts,each inde ndently suspended from, the upper :part, inge' meansextending across only the lower front edge of the upper part and theupper edgeof for preventing such parts from swinging backwardly in relation to each other, loops carried at the rear of the thigh and legportions, and resilient means connecting loops, whereby either legi portion may be drawn up toward the thig portion. l

In testimony whereof, I- have hereunto signedmynamex p IYINCENTJ. LOUGHLIN.-

each of the limbparts, each limb part being formedwitha surface which coacts with the such upper part and limb parts, from swing ing backwardly in relation to each other, and a top ring providedat thetop oft'the upper flat surface of the upper, part for preventing 7. A tackling dummy comprising an upper I part, two separatelimb partsindependently suspended from the upper part, each limb part comprising a thigh portion and a leg portion, a back ring provided at the back, of I i the upper part for suspending the dummy, f I

loops carried at'the rearof the thighand leg portions, and resilient means connecting the loops. o p I 8. A tackling dummy comprisingan upper face, two separate limb parts, each inde endently suspended from the upper part, means extending across only thelower front ed e of the upper part and the upper edge of,

eac of the limb parts, each limb part being formed with a surface which coacts. with the fiat surface of the upper part for preventing suchjupper part and limbparts'from swing ing backwardly in relation to each other, and i a garment placed over the upper part, said ingegarment having sleeves which are ,stufied to,

simulate arms. I v

9. A tackling dummy comprising an upper part formed with an upper protruding front f preventlng portion, and a concave abdominal portion below the protruding 7 portion,- two separate limb parts, each independently suspended from the upper part and hingedly attached to the upper part at the front of the dummy only, and means for formed in simulation of the human thigh, 1 hinge means connecting the limb'p-artswith the upper part for permitting the limb parts and upper part to swing forwardly, means the

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3856298 *Jan 14, 1972Dec 24, 1974P FranttiHockey practice apparatus
US3907291 *Feb 27, 1974Sep 23, 1975Parker Robert EarlEducational device for teaching blocking in football
US4447056 *Aug 26, 1982May 8, 1984Dalton Tom EFootball training apparatus
US5183450 *Dec 5, 1991Feb 2, 1993Stelmach John JMartial arts training apparatus
US5263912 *Feb 1, 1993Nov 23, 1993Stelmach John JMartial arts training apparatus
US5335906 *Jul 17, 1992Aug 9, 1994Delker Charles LDummy apparatus for football practice
US8808115 *May 2, 2012Aug 19, 2014Anthony D. DeTroiaFootball tackling dummy apparatus
US8814729 *Apr 22, 2010Aug 26, 2014John Paul HartiganTackle practice apparatus and a method for practising tackling in a contact sport
US8894552 *Sep 28, 2011Nov 25, 2014Matt Peter WILSONStrap for adapting a heavy bag to model real-life situations for training
US20120094788 *Apr 22, 2010Apr 19, 2012John Paul HartiganTackle practice apparatus and a method for practising tackling in a contact sport
US20120246884 *Sep 28, 2011Oct 4, 2012Wilson Matt PeterStrap for adapting a heavy bag to model real-life situations for training
US20120283047 *Nov 8, 2012Detroia Anthony DFootball tackling dummy apparatus
WO2009047527A1 *Oct 9, 2008Apr 16, 2009Andre BesterSports training apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/442
International ClassificationA63H3/00, A63H3/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63H3/02, A63H3/003, A63B69/345
European ClassificationA63H3/02, A63H3/00C, A63B69/34F