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Publication numberUS1906870 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 2, 1933
Filing dateMay 3, 1932
Priority dateMay 3, 1932
Publication numberUS 1906870 A, US 1906870A, US-A-1906870, US1906870 A, US1906870A
InventorsPalla Frederick G
Original AssigneePalla Frederick G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Self-defensive firearm
US 1906870 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1933- F. G. PALLA SELF DEFENSIVE FIREARM Filed May 3, 1932 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 y 1933. F. ca. PALLA SELF DEFENSIVE FIREARM Filed May 3, 1932 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. flip Ava/r6. 4144,

9m Q \N s m Patented May 2, 1933 t T t-Eh??? f FREDERICK G. FALL-A, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

SELF-DEFENSIVE FIREARM Application filed May 3,

This invention relates to firearms in general and particularly to a device which is adapted to be supported upon the arm for self-defensive purposes.

5 Statistics undisputably indicate that crime, in general, is on the gradual increase; this is particularly true in cities. Robberies are boldly committed in broad daylight, not infrequently taking place in congested areas and in view of many persons. Gunmen invariably accomplish their purpose with such speed and precision as to render interruption extremely difficult.

In an effort to overcome the above serious menace to human life and property, it is an important object of this invention to provide an extremely simple and highly effective device which may be readily worn upon the arm without detection and which may be instantly placed in its operative position without the least disclosure.

Another object of my invention resides in the provision of a mounting for the firearm which retains it in its predeterminedly set and hidden position within the sleeve of the wearer, permitting the free use of the hands and arms without the least inconvenience.

A still further object of the invention is to 9 provide a relatively stationary and a flexible operating member which may be readily attached to any suitable portion of the garment of the wearer.

A still further object of my invention relates to a novel means interposed between the brace and the firearm which may either support the firearm in its normally hidden position, in its extended and visible position, or which may be further quickly removed from its supporting means, thereby freely permitting its use as a firearm in the usual manner.

Other objects of this invention will hereinafter be set forth, or will be apparent from the description and the drawings, in which is illustrated an embodiment of the device for carrying out my invention.

The invention, however, is not intended to be restricted to the particular constructions and arrangements of parts, nor to particular applications of such constructions, herein shown and described, nor to the specific 1932. Serial No. 608,875.

methods of operation, nor to various details thereof, as the same may be modified in various particulars or be applied'in many varied relations without departing from the spirit and scope of the inventiompra'ctical 55.

embodiment of which hasbeen herein illus- 'trated and describedwithout attempting to Figure 3 is a side elevation thereof, showing it in a fully extended position as for op erating it,

Figure 4 is a similar View illustrating the firearm in its contracted or normal position with respect to its mounting; Figure 5 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on the line 55 of Figure 3, the outline of the firearm being shown in dotted lines;

Figure 6 is a transverse sectional view taken on the line 6.6 of Figure 3 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

Figure '7 is a fragmentary'end elevation of the slide member for mounting the firearm, and

Figure 8 is a View in perspective showing the front portion of the brace together with its component elements.

My invention, in the form or embodiment shown in the drawings and briefly described, comprises a substantially flexible brace 10, which is adapted to encircle the forearm, a firearm 12, a rail 14 carried by the brace 10, a guide member 15 secured to the firearm 12 and a relatively stationary and flexible operating cord 16. v

The arm brace 10 is preferably constructed of flexible material and is adapted to conform to the curvature of the forearm. It will be appreciated that since the brace 10 is adapted to be worn in its proper position for comparatively long periods of time it may be formed either of perforated material or it may be provided with cutout portions of varying proportions, so that it may be worn with the greatest amount of comfort to the wearer and at the same time remain in its predeterminedly set position without slipping or shifting upon the arm. The brace 10 may be secured in its proper position upon the arm by means of the slideable fastener indicated as at 17, as shown in Figure 3 or in any other desired manner.

I will refer now to the firearm supporting means indicated generally as at 1% and which permits the movement of the firearm 12 as desired. The rail 1% is provided with a relatively thin plate portion 18 which is provided with a plurality of integrally secured rivet-receiving ears or lugs 19. This plate 18 is, of course, slightly bent to conform to the curvature of the arm and is riveted as shown at 20 to the brace member 10. The rail 14 is substantially ii-sha ed in cross section and is preferably integrally formed with the plate 18.

With particular reference to Figures 3 and 4 of the accompanying drawings, it will be noted that the extreme ends of the rail are slightly curved so that the coat may readily be passed thereover without injury thereto. The base or plate portion of the rail 14% is provided near the ends thereof with downwardly projecting and integrally formed extensions 21 and 22 for a purpose to be shortly described.

The guide 15 is preferably formed of sheet metal and is adapted to embrace the rail 1 Sufficient clearance is provided between the adjacent bearing surfaces of the rail 1-; and the guide member 15 to permit of the free sliding movement therebetween. The outer face or body portion 23 of the guide member 15 may be provided with a pair of countersunk openings for the reception of the screws 24 for the purpose of securing the firearm 12 thereto. A leaf spring 25 is riveted or otherwise secured to the upper edge of the guide member 15 and is located adjacent the inner end thereof for the purpose of resiliently retaining the guide member 15 and its attached firearm 12 in their inward or hidden position, as is clearly indicated in Figure l. When the guide member 15 is in its extended position as illustrated in Figure 3 the leaf spring 25 obviously bears upon the upper edge or flange of the T-rail 14, thereby preventing any lost motion between the guide member and its rail. 1

A loop or eye 2b is integrally formed upon the lower side of the guide 15 a relatively short distance from the inner end thereof for the purpose of receiving the end 27 of the operating cord 16. It may be here stated that the operating cord 16 is preferably formed of gut or other suitable material which will. embody high tensile strength, which will bend quite freely and at the same time not be materially affected by varying ten'lperatures, thereby assuring its effectiveness when required.

deferring again to the downwardly projecting extension 21, it will be noted that a loop or eye 30 is integrally formed therewith for the purpose of freely receivin and guiding the operating cord 16. The extension 22 is provided with a bracket 3i for the purpose of pivotaiiy mounting the curved pulley 32. The front portion of the bracket 31 is provided with an upwardly extending angular member 83. The horizontal portion of this angular member 33 is formed with a substantially semicircular groove or recess for the purpose of engagi the operating cord 16 while the guide member 15 and its associated firearm l2 its outermost position, is clearly iill ed in Figure hen the guide member is in this position, it will be appreciated that the operating cord will bear against the semicircular CULUUt portion of the a: gular n'ieinbor 33, thereby limiting the forward movement of the guide member.

It has been observed that by forming the flexible brace 10 to properly fit the arm of the wearer and by arranging the operating cord 16 of the proper length, depending upon the length of the wearers arms, the firearm 12 will eii'ectually be caused to move from its hidden position as disclosed in Figure 1 to its outward or visible position as shown in Figure 2 by a slight upward or outward movement of the wearefis arm. When the firearm has been moved to its outwardly extended position as shown in Figures 2 and 3, it is in proper alignment with the forefinger so that it may readily be inserted through the guard of the firearm 12 and against the trigger with the least amount of eifort.

Despite the fact that the length of the rail 14 and its associated guide member 15 may vary, depending upon the length of the individuals forearm and lingers, the anuiunt of movement of the guide upon its rail will always be substantially the same as predetel-mined. For this reason, it will be clearly obvious that the successful operation of my improved self-defensive device may be readily attained within a short period of time.

Any desired form snap or book may be employed at the stationary end of the operating cord 16 for attachment to the vest or the like. Should it be found desirable to connect the extreme end of the ope ating cord 16 to the waist band of the trousers or to the belt, it is but necessary to provide a slightly longer operating cord.

Since the operating cord 16 must be pulled but a relatively short distance to move the firearm from its hidden to the visible position, the length of this operating cord is arranged so that the arm may be moved as in ordinary manipulations without affecting the operating cord, that is to say, when it is desired to project a firearm toward the hand it is but necessary to stretch the arm beyond shapedrailand a fire arm-carrying guide,

the usual movement. In this manner,it will be appreciated that the firearm may be proj ected from the sleeve not only when the arm is in the vertical position as shown in Figure 2 but it may be likewise ejected through the sleeve into the hand when the hands are extended in a forward or downward position,

since gunmen not infrequently command their victim to place their hands in these positions.

Many other changes could be eflected in the particular apparatus designed, and'in the manner of procedure and the uses set forth, and in the specific details thereof, without substantially departing from the in vention hereof, which is intended to be defined in the accompanying claims, the specific description herein being merely of an operative embodiment by which the spirit of the invention may be carried out.

What I claim is: g

l. A firearm projector comprising a sleeve adapted to embrace the forearm of a person and conform to the contour thereof, a T- shaped rail secured to said sleeve, a firearmcarrying guide slidably mounted upon said rail, means for projecting said firearm into operative position in the hands of the wearer, and means for locking said firearm against accidental projection.

2. A firearm projector comprising a flexible sleeve adapted to embrace the forearm of a person and conform to the contour thereof, a T-shaped rail secured to said sleeve, a firearm-carrying guide slidable upon said rail, means for projecting said firearm into operative position in the hands of the wearer, and means for locking said firearm against accidental projection.

3. A firearm projector comprising a flexible sleeve adapted to embrace the forearm of a person, a T-shaped rail secured to said sleeve, a T-slotted firearm-carrying guide slidably mounted upon said rail, means for projecting said firearm into operative position, and means for locking said firearm against accidental projection.

4; A firearm projector comprising a flexible sleeve adapted to embrace the forearm of a person, a T-shaped rail secured to said sleeve, a 'T-slotted firearm-carrying guide slidably mounted upon said. rail, means mounted upon said guide and cooperating with said rail for retaining said guide in retracted position and looking it against accidental projection, and means for projecting said guide into operative position.

5. A firearm projector comprising a rail and a firearm-carrying guide, means for retaining said guide in retracted position,-

means for projecting said guide into opera tive position, and means comprising a'flexiblesleeve for securing said mechanism to the arm of thewearer. 7

6.A firearm projector comprising a T means for retaining said guide in retracted,

position, means for projecting-saidzguide lnto operatlve posltlon, and means comprising a'flexible sleeve for securing said mechanism to the arm'of the wearer.

7. A concealed firearm projector compris ing a T-shaped rail and a firearm-carrying guide mounted upon said rail, means for re-' taining a firearm in concealed position, means for projecting said'firearminto visible and operative position and means for securing said mechanism to the forearm of'the wearer comprising a sleeveadapted to embrace the forearm of the wearer and conform to the contour thereof to lend stability and rigidity to said projecting device.

' 8. A firearm projector comprising asleeve adapted to embrace the forearm; of'a personand conform to the contourthereof, a T-shaped rail secured to said sleeve, a'firearm-carrying guide slidably mounted upon said rail, means for projecting said firearm into operative positionin the hands of the wearer comprising a flexible member which projects said firearm into-said position when tensioned, and means for 'locking'said firearm against accidental" projection comprising a spring locking said rail and firearmcarrying guide together.

9. A firearm projector comprising a flex-- ible sleeve adapted to embrace the forearm of a person and conform to the contour there of, a T-shaped rail secured to said sleeve, a

firearm-carrying guide slidable upon said rail, flexible means for, projecting said firearm into operative position when tensioned, and spring means for locking said rail and firearm-carrying guide together, whereby said firearm is locked against accidental projection.

10. A firearm projector comprising a flexible sleeve adapted to embrace the forearm of sleeve, a T-slotted firearm-carrying guide slidably mounted upon said rail, a flexible a person, a T-shaped rail secured to said ble sleeve adapted to embrace the forearm of a person, a T-shaped rail secured to said sleeve, a T-slotted firearm-carrying guide slidably mounted upon said rail, means mounted upon said guide and cooperating with said rail for retaining said guide in retracted position and locking it against accidental projection, and a flexible member for projecting said guide into operative position when tensioned.

12; A firearm projector comprising a rail and a firearm-carrying guide, means for retaining said guide in retracted position, said 'means comprising a spring for locking said rail and guide together, means for projecting said guide into operative position, said means comprisingafiexible member adapted to project said firearm-carrying guide when tensioned, and a flexible sleeve for securing said mechanism to the arm of the wearer;

13. A firearm projector comprising a T- shaped rail and a firearm-carrying guide, a I a spring forlocklng said rail and guide lnretracted'position, afiexible member adapted to project said guide int-o operative position whentensioned, and a sleeve for securing said mechanism to the arm of thewearer.

14. 'A concealed firearm pro ector comprising a T shaped rail and a firearm-carrying guide mounted upon said rail, spring means for retaining a firearm in concealed position,

- a flexible member for projecting said firearm into visible and operative position when ten- -SiOIl8df1I1d means for securing said mocha nismto the forearm of the Wearer comprising a sleeve adapted to embrace the forearm of the wearer and conform to the contour thereof to lend stability and rigidity to said projecting device.

Inwitness WhereofI have hereunto signed

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2977703 *Oct 10, 1955Apr 4, 1961Sarvis Howard CForearm gun
US3793759 *Mar 29, 1972Feb 26, 1974Raymond Lee Organization IncConcealed pistol mounting
US4398365 *Jul 23, 1979Aug 16, 1983Naum PokhisFirearm
US6016620 *Jan 15, 1998Jan 25, 2000Morgan; Delmas DaleArm and hand gun support apparatus
US6696986 *Mar 16, 1999Feb 24, 2004Shelton E. Harrison, Jr.Key palette improvements
US6796467 *Feb 9, 2001Sep 28, 2004Franco CaldanaDevice for the quick and easy use of a small size cellular telephone
US7470244May 16, 2003Dec 30, 2008Harrison Jr Shelton EFlexion-discouraging splint system, method and device
US8505230 *Jun 30, 2010Aug 13, 2013Reconrobotics, Inc.Robot mounting device
US20120185093 *Jun 30, 2010Jul 19, 2012Reconrobotics, Inc.Robot mounting device
Classifications
U.S. Classification42/94, 42/1.11
International ClassificationF41C9/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41C9/00
European ClassificationF41C9/00