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Publication numberUS1907629 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 9, 1933
Filing dateDec 14, 1932
Priority dateDec 14, 1932
Publication numberUS 1907629 A, US 1907629A, US-A-1907629, US1907629 A, US1907629A
InventorsWalty Arthur R
Original AssigneeWalty Arthur R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lace fastener
US 1907629 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 9, 1933. A. R. WALTY 1,907,629

LACE FASTENER Filed Dec. 14, 1932 V will tend to cling Patented May 9, 1 933 PATENT OFFICE ARTHUR R. WALTY, OF ALBANY, NEW YORK LACE FASTENER Application filed December 14, 1932. Serial No. 647,170.

While not limited thereto, the device embodying my invention is particularly useful as a fastener for shoe laces. It is a common occurrence for shoe laces to become untied with the result that, if undiscovered, the wearer is likely to trip on the free ends thereof with resultant injury or, if discovered, the ends have to be retied at a time when and a place where the tying operation is inconvenient.

The principal object of my invention is the provision of a fastener for laces, and particularly for shoe laces which is simple and cheap and at the same time effectively prevents the laces from becoming untied.

My invention will best. be understood by reference to the accompanying drawing in which I have illustrated a preferred embodiment thereof and in which- Fig. 1 is an enlarged side View of a fastener embodying my invention and illus trating the ends of the laces extending through the opening with which it is provided;

Fig. 2 is a longitudinal section through Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged side view illustrating the ends of the shoe laces tied and the fastener slightly distorted due to the tension on the laces;

Fig. 4 is a plan view of a shoe and illustrating the device embodying my invention associated with the shoe laces to keep them tied;

Fig. 5 is a section in the plane 5-5 of Fig. 2 illustrating the preferred form of my invention; and

Fig. 6 is a section similar to Fig. 5 of a modified form.

Like reference characters indicate like parts throughout the drawing.

Referring to the drawing, 1 is the lace fastener formed of yielding, resilient material, preferably soft rubber, the surface of which to or frictionally engage the laces. The ends are bulbous, as at 2, and the device is provided with an intermediate contracted portion 3, so that generally it is shaped somewhat like a dumb-bell. The fastener is provided with an opening 4 ex tending axially therethrough and of sufiicient size to permit the passage of the laces 5.

After the ends of the shoe lace have been passed through the opening in opposite di'-' rections, a single knot is first tied in the usual manner, and the tension exerted on the lace in forming this knot slightly distorts the fastener as shown in Fig. 3. Over this single knot, a bow knot is then tied in the usual manner. When once tied, even though the bow knot works loose, the continuous tension exerted by the fastener on the ends of the shoe lace due to the resiliency of the fastener together with the clingingsurface of the rubber which engages the laces, as at points 6, 7, 8 and 9, prevent the first knot from becoming untied. In fact the tension of the fastener holds the lace so securely that were it not for the shape of the fastener it would be very diflicult to untie the knot without the aid of a pick, pin or similar instrument. However, when the fastener is distorted to the position illustrated in Fig.6, an opening 10 is provided between the laces and the fastener. the lace through the opening 10 in the appropriate direction, the single knot is untied assiming that the bow knot is already untie a The opening 4 is preferably provided with a liner 11 formed of a flexible wear-resisting material such, for example, as canvas. The liner may if desired first be formed and the rubber molded around the same or a liner may be inserted in the opening of the preformed fastener and secured in position by suitable cement or other adhesive.

In order to prevent wear and tear of the walls surrounding the orifices of the opening, th'ey'are preferably chamfered or cupped as 90 at 12.

It is to be understood that my device is actually very small and therefore very inconspicuous. It need not be more than about one-quarter inch in length. Furthermore it may be made in any color to match the color of the shoes or laces'with which it is to be used. Y While I have illustrated the fastener embodying my invention applied to a shoe lace,

By thrusting one end of 75 it will, of course, be understood that it is equally applicable in any position Where a lace is used, as for example, with corsets.

While I have described my invention in its preferred embodiment it is to be understood that the words which I have used are words of description rather than of-limitation and that changes within'the purview of the ap-,' pended claims may be made without departing from the true scope and spirit of my invention in its broader aspects.

What I claim is:

1. A lace fastener comprising a comparatively small body of yieldable rubber of some, what greater length than thickness and having; an 5 opening extending longitudinally therethrough adapted to-permit the passage of-two laces; the walls of said-body about the opening being comparatively thick, whereby .said body olfers a rather substantial resistance the passageof twolaces, and a liner for said to deformation when said laces are drawn tightly into a simple knot about said body, but when so deformed will hold said knot by frictional engagement with said laces.

2. In a lace fastener, anelongated member formed of yielding,"resilient material and provided with an opening-extending longitudinally therethrough and of sufficient-size to permit the passage of two laces the walls 5surroundingtheorifices of said opening being cformed. of yielding, resilient material en-- massage of two laces provided with a chamfer.

3. In a lace fastener, an elongated member formedof yielding, resilient material en lar-ged at; the ends and contracted therebei'tween, said member being provided with an longitudinally thereopening extending through and of sufiicient size .topermit the passage of two laces.

4. .In a lace fastener, an elongated member largedat the ends and contracted therebe tween, said member being provided with an opening; extending longitudinally therethrough and of sufficient size to permit the r the walls surrounding the orifices of said opening beingqprovided with :a chamfer.

5.; In a lace fastener, an elongated member formed of yielding, resilient material bulbous sozaatthe ends and provided with an intermedio therethrough member ate contracted portion, said member being; provided withan opening extending longitudinally therethrough and of sufiicient size to permit the passage of two laces;

6. In a lace fastener, an elongated member formed of resilient material bulbous at the ends and provided with an intermediate contracted portion, said member being provided with an open-ingextending longitudinally and of sufiicient size to permit the passage of two laces; the walls surround-, ingthe orifices of said opening being provided with a chamfer.

7. Ina lace fastener a dumbbell-shaped formed of yielding a rubber and pros vided with an opening extending longitudinally therethrough and of suflicient size to permit the passage of two laces.

8. In a lace fastener a dumbbell-shaped member formed of comparatively yieldable rubber and provided with an opening extending longitudinally thereof and of sufficient size. to permit the passage of two laces the interior of said opening being lined with a yieldable wear-resisting material.

9. In a lacefastener a dumbbell-shaped member formed of rubber and provided with an opening extending longitudinally thereof and of sufficient size to permit the passage of two laces; the walls surrounding the orifices of said opening being cup-shaped.

10. In a lace fastener an'elongated member formed of yielding, resilientmaterial andprovided with an opening extending longitudt.

opening formed of wear-resisting material.

ARTHUR R. l/VALTY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2632219 *Apr 22, 1950Mar 24, 1953Massey Stanley SElastic fastener for cord, fabric, and the like
US2655758 *Jan 7, 1949Oct 20, 1953Pat WarrenTrotline or the like
US2808632 *Apr 29, 1952Oct 8, 1957Shuford Mills IncCombination knot and retaining means therefor
US4991273 *Jul 24, 1989Feb 12, 1991Huttle Carolyn JShoelace fastenings, and shoes and sneakers including the same
US5182838 *Aug 13, 1991Feb 2, 1993Stenner John RFilament, cordage locking device
US5440788 *Apr 4, 1994Aug 15, 1995Boden; Robert O.Cord lock of elastomeric material
US5724710 *Apr 17, 1995Mar 10, 1998Hancock; Michael T.Fastener for securing an object
US5797167 *Jul 1, 1996Aug 25, 1998Schwab; Leonard M.Elastic cord tie-down construction
US5884375 *Nov 3, 1997Mar 23, 1999Hancock; MichaelMethod for securing an object by lines
US6189186Mar 29, 1999Feb 20, 2001Robert O. BodenElastomeric cord lock with dual cord passages
WO1993003641A1 *Aug 13, 1992Mar 4, 1993John Richard StennerFilament, cordage locking device
Classifications
U.S. Classification24/712.2, 24/712.7, 24/129.00R, 24/115.00H
International ClassificationA43C7/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43C7/00
European ClassificationA43C7/00