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Publication numberUS1908279 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 9, 1933
Filing dateApr 25, 1930
Priority dateApr 25, 1930
Publication numberUS 1908279 A, US 1908279A, US-A-1908279, US1908279 A, US1908279A
InventorsBaylis Robert N
Original AssigneeSmokador Mfg Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ash receiver
US 1908279 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Max-9, 1933. R. N/BAYLIS 1,908,279 v ASH RECEIVER Original Filed April 25, 1950 ATTORNEY3.

Patented May 9, 1933 UNITED} STATES PATENT OFFICE ROBERT N. BAYLIS, F CALDWELL, NEW JERSEY, ASSIGNOB T0 SMOKADOB MANUFAC- TUBING CO.,, INC., 01' BLOOMFIELD, NEW

JERSEY, A CORPORATION 01' DELAWARE Asa. naomvnn application amas, 1980, Serial 110,447,246. Renewed March a,v was.

This invention relates to certain new and useful improvements in a shirejceivers and consists in the novel features of construction here inafter described. J .i l The object of the invention'i's to provide an ash receiver in which smokers waste, such as cigar and cigarette ashes, butts and the like, are conveyed to a receptacle within which offensive gases or smoke arising from such waste will'be retained. Another object to provide a ing my ash recelver supported thereby;

Fig. 2 IS a relatively enlarged side view,

partly in section, of the complete ash receiver,

certain portions being broken away and in section Fig. 3 is a still further enlarged side elevation of certain details-,also partly.broken away;

Fig. 4 is Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a side elevation of a modification.

'It will be understood that I have shown my invention onlyin certain preferred forms. In that form of my invention shown in Figs.

1 to 4, 1 represents an ash tray having a centrally contracted discharge outlet which is preferably extended to form an elongated cylindrical tube. '3 is a socket mounted on the contraction 2, well above the lowerdischarge end thereof. This socket is preferably made a plan view'of the parts shown in I so as to screw onto the open end of a jar 4, which constitutes the ash receiving repectable.

This jar is preferably madeoftranspi rent glassand may be ofthegwell known 40 the jar 4 whenever the latteris sufliciently full of waste to'require emptying. The socket 3 should efiect 'asmoke-tight joint with the 'ar 4. 5 is a bracket carried by the remova le tray portion and preferably locatediadjacent to the discharge endof the contraction 2 and at one side thereof., Tiltably mountedlupon the bracket 5 is a deflector plate 6, whichl inayterni'a valve, and which inay have a short-arm construction which lends itself tobeing associated with a raised stand or cab1- to permit them to pass.

a on. jar? type. Thetray portion combines the but, this, is not as efficient as the form first parts 1, 2-and 3, and is removable bodilyfrom 5 to act as a counterbalance. Small weights 6", like drops of solder, may be added to the short arm '6 to effect a proper balance. In its normal position, they tiltable deflector 6 extends obliquely' underneath the lower discharge end of the part 2,and is of such a size that smoke or objectionable gases arising from waste in the bottom of the jar will be deflected away, from said discharge end and up into the annular space in the upper part of the jar, above the discharge end of the contraction 2. The size of this annular jspace'is determined bythe size of the jar and the extent towhich the part 2 projects down into the same. In the preferred construction, the low} er discharge end of the part 2 is beveled off, and the deflector 6 is somountedthat it does not actually close the same. Consequently, light ashes, and the smaller-particles of waste, may passfreely through the open space between the parts 2 and 6 and into the jar 1 without tilting the deflector. If "any pi'eces of waste'too large to pass freely through the normally open space between the parts 2 and 6 are dropped into the tray, the weigh of these pieces will cause the deflector to t1 where y said larger pieces may then pass into the'bottom of the jar. By reason of the normal oblique position of the plate, these larger pieces of waste will, whenthe encounter said plate, slide or tumble down t e incline thereof tojthelower-end remote of the fulcrum where theirweight vfvill be most effectively ap-- plied for the purpose of tilting the deflector In Fig. 5, 1 have-shown a modification in which-the deflector 6 is so supported that it will bear against the discharge end ofthe contraction 2 andpracticallyclose the same,

described; because it requires an accumula- QtitinBfQenOugh of the lighter particles then-2i of. It will be found in practice that this action occurs effectively even though the deflector does not actually close said discharge end. Whenever the jar becomes sufliciently full of waste to requlre emptying, that fact may be easily determined by peering through the transparent wall thereo and then the tray portion, together with the deflectorplate, may be bodily removed from thejar and the latter emptied. If it .is, desirable to clean the deflector plate, it may be freely slid off its bracket for that purpose. The tray is itself preferably sufliciently large to pro ect beyond the sides of the jar so that the entire ash receiver may be suspended by the tray when the latter rests on a proper support, for

example, as shown in Fig. 1, wherein 7 repre tube to the open "endof'saidrece tacle for.

closing the latter, the lower end 0 said tube projectin down into the receptacle and being out o obliquely, a balanced valve obliquely positioned ad acent the lower end of said tube, and a support for said valve carried by the tube and adjacent to the upper part of the obliquely cut oflf portion thereof.

2. An ash receiver comprising, a waste receivin receptacle open at the top, a tray having a ownwar'dly projecting waste conducting tube, means for securing the tray and tube to the open end of said receptacle for closing the latter, the lower end of said tube project- 7 in down into said receptacle and being cut o obliquely, a balanced valve obliquely positioned adj acent'the lower end of the tube but slightly spaced therefrom, and a support for said valve carried by the tube adjacent to the upper part of the obliquely cut oil portion thereof.

ash receiver comprising, a waste receiving receptacle open at the top, a tray having a downwardly projecting waste conductmg tube, means for securing said tray and tubeto. the open end of said receptacle to close the latter, the lower end of said tube projectng down into the receptacle and being out o obliquely, a bracket carried by the tube at one side thereof and adjacent the upper part of the obliquely cut oil portion, a valve plate bent at one end to form an angle, said bracket supporting said valve plate at said angle, that part of said valve plate outside of said bracket forming a counterweight for that portion of said plate inside of said bracket and adjacent to the discharge end of the waste conducting tube.

4. An ash receiver comprising, a waste receiving receptacle open at the top, a tray having a downwardly projecting waste conducting tube, means for securing said tray and tube to the open end of said receptacle to close the latter, the lower end of said tube projecting down into the receptacle and being cut oil obliquely, a bracket carried by the tube at one side thereof and adj acent/the upper part of the obliquely cut ofl portion, a valve plate bent at one end to form an angle said bracket supporting said valve plate at said angle, that part of said valve plate outside of said bracket forming a counterweight for that.. portion of said plate inside of said bracket and adjacent to the discharge end of the waste conducting tube, said valve late being slidably removable from said bracket.

' 5. An ash receiver comprising,a-wast receiving receptacle open at the top, a tray portion having a downwardl projecting contraction forming a passage or conducting waste into said receptacle and also havin means for connecting said tray portion to t e open end of said receptacle for closing the latter, the lower end of said contraction projecting down into said receptacle to form an annular smoke collecting chamber in the upper part thereof, a tiltable smoke deflecting member normally positioned obliquely and projecting underneath the discharge end of saidggc'on;

traction and depressible by the weight of waste falling thereon, said deflecting member being supported by said tray ortion at one side of the discharge end of said contraction to deflect ascending smoke or gases away from the discharge end of said contraction and into said smoke collecting chamber.

6. An ash receiver comprising, a waste receiving receptacle open at the top, a tray portion having a downwardly projecting contraction forming a passage for' gijiductlng waste into said receptacle, means for connecting said tray portion to the open end of said receptacle, the lower end of said contraction pro ecting downwardly from the tray to form an annular smoke collecting chamber around said contraction and above the discharge end thereof, and a tiltable smoke deflecting member normally positioned obliquely and projecting underneath the discharge end of said contraction and depressible by the weight of waste fallingv thereon, said deflecting member being supported by said' tray portion at one side of the discharge and of said contraction to deflect ascending smoke orgas'esawajifi firi f

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2437226 *Apr 1, 1946Mar 2, 1948Fischer Casting CompanySmoker's stand
US2539166 *Feb 20, 1946Jan 23, 1951Smokador Mfg Co IncAsh receiver
US2583730 *Jul 10, 1946Jan 29, 1952Cadet Smokestands CompanyTobacco ash receptacle
US2884134 *Sep 26, 1957Apr 28, 1959Batterson Carl EMineral separators
US2973879 *Feb 29, 1960Mar 7, 1961Darst Lloyd EAsh tray
US3523640 *Apr 10, 1968Aug 11, 1970Roth HildeCigarette and the like ash receiver
US3871387 *Jan 22, 1973Mar 18, 1975Busse RidoAshtray
US5632401 *May 13, 1996May 27, 1997Hurd; John W.Garbage container and liner dispensing system
US6626322May 14, 2001Sep 30, 2003Justrice Manufacturing CompanyReceptacle for spent smoking materials
US7017517 *Jul 11, 2003Mar 28, 2006Nicole PaquetteWaste collection system and apparatus for feeders
EP1453391A1 *Nov 6, 2002Sep 8, 2004Smoke Free Systems ABAn ash handling system
Classifications
U.S. Classification232/43.2, 220/501
International ClassificationA24F19/06, A24F19/00
Cooperative ClassificationA24F19/06, A24F19/00
European ClassificationA24F19/06, A24F19/00