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Publication numberUS1910062 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 23, 1933
Filing dateSep 11, 1931
Priority dateSep 11, 1931
Publication numberUS 1910062 A, US 1910062A, US-A-1910062, US1910062 A, US1910062A
InventorsSchepmoes Lindsley
Original AssigneeSafety Car Heating & Lighting
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lighting fixture
US 1910062 A
Abstract  available in
Images(8)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

- M i 1933. L. SCHEPMOES 1,910,062

LIGHTING FIXTURE Filed Sept. 11. 1931 8 Sheets-Sheet l L N F INVENTOR BY ATTORNEY5%.\LAQMJZ May 23, 1933. L. SCHEPMOES 1,910,062

LIGHTING FIXTURE Filed Sept. 11. 1931 8 Sheets-Sheet 2 g -T. INVENTOR RNEYS y 1933- L. SCHEPMOES 1,910,062

LIGHTING FIXTURE Filed Sept. 11. 1931 8 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR y 1933- 1.. SCHEPMOES 1,910,062

LIGHTING FIXTURE Filed Sept. 11. 1931 8 Sheets-Sheet 5 LL 4(-4AINVENTOR BY ATTORNEYSA y 1933. L. SCHEPMOES 1,910,062

LIGHTING FIXTURE Filed Sept. 11. 1931 8 Sheets-Sheet s INVENTOR BY ATTORNEYS May 23, 1933. SCHEPMOES LIGHTING FIXTURE Filed. Sept. 11. 1931 8 Sheets-Sheet 7 INVENTOR BY ATTORNEYS May 23, 1933. 1.. SCHEPMOES LIGHTING FIXTURE Filed Sept. 11. 1931 8 Sheets-Sheet 8 QL" INVENTOR ATTORNEYSWW- Patented May 23, 1933 UNITED STATES PATEF FFEC LINDSLEY SCEEPMOES, OF NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT} AS$IGNOR TO THE SAFETY CAR HEATING & LIGHTING COMPANY, A CORPORATEON OF NEW JERSEY LIGHTING FIXTURE Application filed September 11, 1931. Serial No. 562,254.

This invention relates to a lighting fixture.

One of the objects of this invention is to provide a lighting fixture of simple and thoroughly practical construction. Another object of this invention is to provide a device of the above character which will present a pleasing and striking appearance while increasing the illuminating efiiciency thereof. Another object of this invention is to provide a device of the above character which may be readily and inexpensively manufactured. Another object of this invention is to provide a device of the above character which may be installed with a minimum amount of labor and upon which repairs may be made with the greatest ease. Another object of this invention is to provide a device of the above character, which, while serving in an illuminating capacity, also may serve to produce novel and ornamental effects. Other objects will be in part obvious and in part pointed out hereinafter.

The invention accordingly consists in the features of construction, combinations of elements, and arrangements of parts as will be exemplified in the structure to be hereinafter described, and the scope of the application of which will be indicated in the following claims.

In the accompanying drawings, in which are shown several of the various possible embodiments of this invention, I

Figure 1 is a perspective view showing one form of my lighting fixture as installed upon a wall or the like;

Figure is a perspective view of another form ofiny lightingfixture as installed;

Figure 3 is a perspective view of another form of my lighting fixture as installed;

Figure l: is a perspective view of still an:

other form of my lighting fixture as installed;

Figure 5 is a perspective view of another form of my lighting fixture as installed;

Figure 6 is a perspective view of another along the lines 88 of Figure 1;

Figure 9 is a horizontal sectional view taken along the lines 9-9 of Figure 6;

Figure 10 is a horizontal sectional view taken along the line 1010 of Figure 5; and Figure 11 is a horizontal sectional view taken along the lines 11-11 of Figure 2.

Similar reference characters refer to similar parts throughout the several views of the drawings.

Referring now tothe drawings in detail, there is shown in Figure 1 a lighting fixture generally indicated at 10 suitably mounted upon a wall 11. Wall 11 may be of any suitable character such as, for example, paneling, plaster, or the like. Lighting fixture 10 includes a mirror-member 2 provided with an opening 12a within which I mount a luminaire 13 in a manner to be describedin detail hereinafter.

It should be understood that by the term luminaire I mean any light emitting body of a translucent nature, an illustrative example of which is a globe or the like formed from glass or synthetic resin. I

Mirror member 12 together with luminaire 13 is suitably positioned over a cavity or recess 14k in wall 11, as best shown in Figure 8. As a source of illumination for luminaire 13,

remaining portion of member 18 extending through wall 15a is suitably threaded to re-' ceive anut'20 to clamp member 18 securely to casing 15. Secured to the lower end of tubular member 18 is a socket 21, of any desired character, preferably attached to member 18 by means of a collar 22 embracing member 18 and a screw 23 extending through the collar to bear against member 18. Socket 21 carries an incandescent bulb 24, this bulb being of sufficient capacity to carrycurrent furnished through a cord 25 carryingconductors 26 and 27 connected to any suitable source of current and extending through tur I preferably provide a casing 15 having its face. upon its rear side.

bular member 18 to be connected in turn to suitable terminals therein.

Vhen current is flowing through conductors 26 and 27 to illuminate bulb 24, light emanating therefrom is cast through luminaire 13 and, to facilitate this action, I preferably provide a reflecting surface 28 upon the inner side of wall a. Preferably 1 provide, also, vertical channels 29 extending upvardly from the base of fixture 10, through wall 11 and thence into cavity 14. Further, there are provided vertical channels 30 extending downwardly from the top of fixture 10 into cavity 14, and in this manner air may pass up channels 29, into casing 15, subsequently to pass out through channels 30, to carry away excessive heat generated by bulb 24 when lighted.

Turning back to Figure 1, I preferably mount mirror-member 12 in a frame 31 eX tending through the four corners of which into wall 11 are screws 32 for firmly securing it to wall 11. Frame 31, which is preferably formed from a suitable metal, may carry any desired designupon its surface in order to set off mirror member 12 from wall 11 in a pleasing manner.

Mirror-member 12 is an image reflector; that is to say, the reflecting characteristics thereof are specular or suiiicient to reflect an image in all its details. Furthermore, I have found a plated member such as a metallic sheet plated withhighly polished chrome to be highly desirable for my purposes. Thus,

the reflecting surface 33 Figure 8) of member 12 is preferably on the top or front side thereof as distinguished from the common mirror formed from glass or other transparent material and carrying the reflecting sur- Accordingly, there are many advantages in the use of a mirrormember having its reflecting surface on its front side, although a common mirror may be used with certain prevalent disadvantages.

Luminaire 13 may be formed from any translucent or transparent material such as glass or various synthetic resins such as phenolic condensation products, the character. of

this composition being dependent upon the particular form of attachment to be employed between the luminaire and fixture 10, will be described more fully hereinafter.

It should be noted that the luminaire 13 is in the form of one half a lightsurrounding i shade, that is to say, two such half shades joined to form a whole shade would be capable of surrounding a source of light. It will be understood that the luminaire may take various forms and dimensions.

If luminaire 13 is to be formed from glass or some other non-yieldable material, 1 pro vide preferably upon its topand bottom sides, as viewed in Figure 8, two recesses or cavities 34 and 35. Still referring to Figure 8, there T is shown an L-shaped member 36 secured to frame 31 and extending downwardly to enmirror-member 12. Extending between L-shaped member 36 and frame 31 is a U-shaped member 37 having its legs extending downwardly and secured to the opposite sides of a metallic housing 38 (Figures 1 and 8). Parts 36, 37 and 38 may all be rigidly or integrally connected to each other and secured to mirror-member 12, the resultant effect created thereby being thatof a chain holding luminaire 13 to frame'31, as best seen in Figure 1. Housing 38 is of any suitable design and the bottom side 38a thereof is substantially at right angles to mirror-member 12 (Figure 8). Mounted within housing 38 is a cup-shaped member 39 containing a spring (not shown) pressing against a ball 40 extending below the plane of side 38a.

Suitably positioned near the bottom of cavity 14 is a metallic housing 41 of any desired (,lesign but preferably taking the form of one half of a knob, nut, or the like; the top side 41a of housing 41, as viewed in Figure 8, is substantially at right angles to mirror-member 12. The distance between side 41a and side 38a is preferably equal to the length of lun'iinaire l3. Positioned within housing 41 is a cup-shaped member 42 within which is a spring (not shown) pressing against a ball 43 extending above side 41a. Suitably secured to the sides of casing 15 are a series of braclzets 44 having their legs 45 extending beyond sides 38a and 41a and thus tending to stop anything sliding inwardly or in a direction toward the rear wall 15a. of casing 15.

It will now be clear that I may insert luminaire 13 in opening 12a of mirror-member 12 by sliding it along sides 38a and 410;, thus pressing balls 40 and 43 into cup-shaped members 39 and 42 against the springs seated therein. As luminaire 13 slides farther toward casing 15, it eventually comes to rest against brackets 44 and, at this time, recesses 34 and 35 in the lumiz-iaire are in substantial registry with balls 40 and 43 respectively, thus allowing the balls to snap into the recesses. lVhen luminaire 13 has assumed this position, it is securely and firmlyheld against accidental displacement by spring-pressed balls 40 and 43 coacting with sides 38a and 41a of housings 38 and 41. However, when it proves necessary or convenient to remove luminaire 13 as, for example, when it is necessary to change bulb 24 or adjust the various parts contained-in casing 15, it is a comparatively simple matter to pull luminaire 13 from its seating against the action of springpressed balls 40 and 43.

Turnlng again to F lgure 1, 1f luminaire '13 has been attached to mirror-member 12 in the manner described above and a suitable source of current'has been connected to conductors 26 and 27 so that illumination is furnished to bulb 24, light is cast through the luminaire. As soon as luminaire 13 is illumimethod of mounting fixture 59 and its ad nated, ail-image A appears in mirror-member 12. Image A is the complement or reverse of that portion of luminaire 13 which is visible to the observer. It appears at the sides of luminaire 13 on mirror-member 12,.

thus giving the impression that there is another portion of luminaire 13 corresponding to luminaire 13 in shape and size and suspended in a space. Thus the luminaire being in the form of one half a light surrounding shade, its reflection in the member 12 gives the illusion of a whole light surrounding shade and the light rays are diffused through one half a light surrounding shade while giving the appearance of being difi'used through a whole light surrounding shade. Furthermore, I achieve the same effect for those parts connected to luminaire 13, a portion of image A being the complement of housing 4-1, and another portion thereof being the complement of parts 36, 37 and 38. In this ingenious and thoroughly practical manner, the observer obtains the impression that he is seeing a luminaire, complete in all three dimensions, suspended from frame 31 by a chain (parts 36, 37 and 38). Further still, I have found that mirror-member 12, aside from creating this novel ornamental illusion, also increases the efiiciency of my fixture for the light reflected therefrom is added to the light passing from luminaire 13 instead of being absorbed as is often the case in common constructions.

Turning now to another embodiment of my invention, I have shown in Figure 2, a fixture generally indicated at 59 preferably adapted for installation in or upon the cornor of two adjoining walls 60 and 61. In this instance, walls 60 and 61 may be formed from any suitable material, as .described above, and fixture 59 comprises two mirrormcmbers 62 and 63 mounted upon and secured to walls 60 and 61 respectively in a manner to be described hereinafter. Mounted within an opening 7 1 in mirr0r-members 62 and 63 and substantially at the corner formed thereby is a luminaire 65 which may take any desired form asris described above with reference to luminaire 13 (Figure 1). Further, I preferably form mirror-members 62 and 63 from plated metal such as that described above.

Turning to Figure 11, I have shown on joining casing 66 in walls 60' and 61. Thus a cavity 67 is formed in walls 60 and 61, substantially at the corner formed thereby, to which casing 66 is secured in any desired manner. Bulb 2& with its socket may be Connected to casing 66 in a manner substantially similar to that described with reference to Figure 8. Preferably, mirror-members 62 and 63 extend inwardly along theplanes of walls 60 and 61 and overlap cavity 67, as best shown in Figure 11. Mirror-members 62 and 63 may be secured to Walls 60 and 61 in any suitable manner as by screws 60a (Flgure 2) extending through frames 68 and 69 thereof. The outer sides 7 O and 71 of casing 66 are bent inwardly so that the edges thereof meet mirror-members 62 and 63 substantially at right angles. Upon the inner surfaces of sides 70 and 71 are formed or secured there to, brackets 72 having legs 73 extending inwardly substantially parallel to mirrormembers 62 and 63 and overlapping the inner edge thereof formed by recess 74.

Turning back to Figure 2, frames 68 and 69 may carry any facial design upon the surface thereof, and extending from the top junction thereof is an L-shaped Inember 75 substantially similar in shape and position to member 36 (Figure 8). Also. secured to mirrcr-members 62 and 63 is a part 7 6 and a part 77, part 77 being secured to luminaire 65.

Parts 75, 76 and 77 tend to create an impression similar to that described with reference to parts 36, 37 and 38 in Figure 8; that is to say, the impression that a chain connected to frames 68 and 69 is suspending luminaire 65. Upon the opposite side or lower end of opening! Tet a metallic housing 78 substantially similar in shape to housing 11 in Figure 8.

In this instance (turning to Figure 11), luminaire 65 has formed upon the longitudinal side edges of its openend, two flanges 79a and 79b. To insert luminaire 65 in opening 7 4, the luminaire in this case being formed from yieldable material such as that described above, the opposite sides thereof are forced inwardly toward each other and the luminaireis then placed in the opening so that flanges 79a and 79b lie flush against legs 73 of brackets 7 2. Upon release of pressure, the luminaire is firmly secured in opening 74 of mirror-members 62 and 63 against any accidental displacement due to the fact that flanges 79a and 79b overlap the edge of opening T 1. The removal of luminaire 65 may be accomplished by applying pressure to the opposite sides thereof and pulling outwardly. In order to provide'for free circulation of air within casing 66, thus to carry off excessive heat emanating from bulb 24, I provide inlet openings 80 extending longitudinally into casing 66 between frames 68 and 69 and .walls 60 and 61 respectively. Likewise there are provided two or more openings 81 to bulb 2 1, light is'cast through luminaire.

65 and fixture 59 is in operation. Thus, fixture 59 may serve a source of illumination and, furthermore. images B and C appear in mirror-members 62 and 63 respectively, these images combining to form a complement of HOT luminaire 65, thus creating the illusion that the observer is seeing another portion of luminaire 65, this illusory portion being positioned directly behind luminaire 65 and in a space. Portions of images B and C are also complements of housing 78 and parts 75, 76 and 77 so that the whole gives the appearance that the luminaire 65 is suspended in a space bya chain.

Under certain conditions it may be more desirable to mount luminaire 65 in fixture 59 in another manner, especially if the luminaire is to be formed from a non-yieldable material such as glass orthe like. If it is found desirable to use such a luminaire, I may employ the construction shown in Figure 8 for attaching such a luminaire to fixture 59. As the structural details involved in such a construction are substantially similar to those described with reference to Figure 8, except for possible changes in proportions and dimensions, such a construction will not be described in detail with reference to the embodiment of my invention shown in Figure 2;

Referring now to Figure 3, there is shown a lighting fixture generally indicated at 82, this fixture being admirably adapted for installation in the corner of a room formed by the junction of two adjoining walls and a ceiling or floor. Although fixture 82 is best suited for installation in the above-mentioned position, it may be installed at any point on a corner formed as, for example, by 7 two adjoining walls. As more clearly shown in Figure 3, I preferably mount fixture 82 within a corner formed by adjoining walls 83 and 84 and aceiling 85. Fixture 82 includes two adjoining mirror-members 86 and 87 lying in substantially the same plane as walls 83 and 84 respectively. At the top of mirrorme1nbers 86 and 87, as viewed in Figure 3, is another mirror-member 88 positioned substantially at right angles thereto and thus having its plane corresponding or )arallel to the plane of ceiling 85. Mounted within and attached to mirror-members 86 and 87 to adjoin mirror-member 88 is a luminaire 89. V

Luminaire 89 may be mounted within an opening 90 in mirror-members 86 and 87 in any convenient manner, partially depending upon the material from which it is formed. Preferably, if luminaire 89 is formed from a yieldable material, such as that described above, I may employ the construction shown in Figure 11. In this case, luminaire 89'is held in its operative position by flanges and,

as described above, may be inserted or removed by the application of pressure upon its opposite sides to release these flanges from the edge of opening 90.

On the other hand, if luminaire 89 is formed from a non-yieldable substance such as glass, I preferably mount it within mirror-members 86 and 87 in different-manner, as more clearly shown in Figure 7. The structural details of the casing, socket, bulb and means for attaching luminaire 89 thereto are substantially similar to those described with reference to Figure 8. In this case, however, mirror member 88 extends in a right hand direction, as viewed in Figure 7, to substantially engage legs 45 of brackets 44, and cup-shaped member 39 carrying spring pressed ball 40 is mounted withinand secured to mirror-member 88 so that ball-40 extends below the bottom side 88a of mirrormember 88. Thus, side 88acorresponds to side 38a in Figure 8, and in the construction shown in Figure 7 the distance between side 8811, and side 41a of housing 41 is substantially equal to the length of luminaire 89. Luminaire 89 may be forced inwardly or in a right hand direction, as viewed in Figure 7, until the edge adjoining its open sides engages legs 45 of brackets 44 and, at this time, recesses 91 and 92 in luminaire 89 are in substantial registry with balls 40 and 43 so that the balls may snap inwardly toward each other due to the pressure exerted by springs (not shown) and thus hold luminaire 89 against any accidental displacement. The release of luminaire 89 from'fixture 82, as for example, when repairs in the casing are necessary, may be accomplished by pulling the luminaire in an outward direction or a left hand direction, as viewed in Figure'7, sufficiently to force balls 40 and 43 into cupshaped members 39 and 42, thus allowing the luminaire to slide free.

Turning back to Figure 3, there are shown two L-shaped frames 93 and 94 secured to mirror-members 86 and 87 respectively and meeting each other at the lower end of the fixture, as viewed in Figure 3. Bridging the upper free ends of frames 93 and 94 is a part 95 preferably connected to mirror-member 88 and to ceiling 85. Frames 93 and 94 may carry any facial design and, preferably, part 95 carries a similar design. Also, I preferably'provide screws 96 extending through frames 93 and 94 and into walls 83 and 84 to hold the fixture securely in its permanei'it position. Mirror-members 86, 87 and 88 preferably are formed from plated metal in a manner substantially similarto that with reference to mirror-member 12. As best shown in Figures 3 and 7, I also provide inlet channels 97 extending between the topside of mirrorunember 88 and the surface of ceil 85. Thus, inlet channels 97 extend from the front of part 95, asviewed'in Figure 3 to cavity 14 (Figure-7). Inlet channels are also provided at the base of fixture 82 and in this manner air may circulate from channels 80 through casing 15 and thence out channels 97.

lVhen globe 24 is furnished with a sufiicient source of current, light is cast through luminaire 89 for illuminating purposes. f Images D and E appear in mirro-members 86 and 87, and, like images B and C (Figure 2), they combine to form a complement of luminaire 89. As described above, the observer obtains the impression that he is seeing the remaining portions of luminaire 89 as well as housing 41 in a space. Furthermore, animage F appears in mirror-member 88, this image being the complement of the top portion of luminaire 89, as viewed in Figure 3. Therefore, image F is the reverse of the top portion of luminaire 89, this giving the illusion that a second luminaire is resting on the top of luminaire 65 and hence rising into a space in ceiling 85. Aside from the ornamental effect created by the action described above, fixture 82 is admirably adapted for illuminating purposes as mirror-members 86, 87 and 88 direct light from the luminaire downwardly and outwardly to add to the intensity thereof, the advantages thereof being described above.

Referring now to Figure 4,,there is shown a lighting fixture generally indicated at 98, in this instance preferably formed and adapted to be installed at the junction between a wall 99 and a ceiling 100, Thus, a mirrormember 101, running substantially parallel to the plane of wall 99, adjoins and is connected to a mirror-member 102 running sub stantially at right angles thereto and thus parallel to the plane of ceiling 100. Mirrormember 101 may take any convenient shape and I preferably provide a U-shaped frame 103 extending about the periphery thereof. The open end of frame 103 is preferably connected to a U-shaped frame 104 following the periphery of mirror-member 1 02. Frame 104 is preferably connected to mirror-member 102 and screws 105 extend therethrough and thence into ceiling 100. Likewise, screws 106 extend through frame 103 into wall 99, screws 105 and 106 coacting to secure fixture 98 in its allotted position in a firm and reliable manner.

Mounted within an opening 107 in mirrormember 101 is a luminaire108. Luminaire 108 may take any convenient shape, although I- have illustratively shown a shape'substantially similar to luminaire 13 (Figure 1). Luminaire 108 may be formed of any suitable transparent or translucent materiahfleither yieldable or non-yieldable, and I preferably secure it to mirror-member 101 and thus fixture 98 in a manner substantially similar to that shown in Figure 7 In this instance, luminaire 108 is preferably formed from nonyieldable material as, for example, glass, and may be inserted and secured to fixture 98 in the above described manner, thus resting against brackets. similar to brackets 44, as more clearly shown in Figure 7, and retained in its closed position by balls in'a manner substantially similar to luminaire 89 shown in Figure 7. Suitable inlet channels 109, po

tend from the base of the fixture into the in- V terior of the fixture (Figure 4). Positioned betweenmirror-member 101 and ceiling 100 are suitable outlet channels 110 also extending into the interior of the fixture so that air may pass through inlet channels 109, thence through the cavity to circulate about bulb 24 and continue out of the fixture through channels 110. 7

W hen bulb 24 is lighted to cast light through luminaire 108, an image G appears in mirror-member 101 and an image H is visible in mirror-member 102. Image G substantially corresponds to image A. (Figure 1) and image H substantially corresponds to image F (Figureg). As described above,the illusion thus created that the observer is seeing another portion of luminaire 108 y suspended in a space (mirror-member 101) and a second luminaire disappearing into ceilmg 100 (mirror-member 102). The increased lighting efficlency ensuing therefrom has been described above.

Turning next to Figure 5, there is shown 51 a fixture generally indicated at 111 preferably shaped and constructed for mounting upon the plane surface of a wall 112. Preferably I provide frame 113 secured-within which is a mirror-member 114 preferablyo'f the character described above. Connecting the top and bottom sides offrame 113, as viewed in Figure 5, are two spaced bars 115 and 116. Preferably bars 115 and 116 lie upon the surface of mirror-member 114,al

though they may extend therethrough. Between bars 115 and 116 is an opening 117 substantially corresponding in shape and proportions to a'luminaire 118 set therein in a manner to be described hereinafter. top and bottom ends of opening 117 I provide two housings 119 and 120 having opposing fiat surfaces upon which the opposite ends of luminaire 118 may rest whentheluminaire is seated within opening 117. Housings 119 and 120 may be of any convenient shape or size, although 1 preferably form them to rep resent one half of a nut, knob, or the like, thus to give the appearance that they are metallic parts secured to lumiuaire 118 when the luminaire is installed as described above. Substantially embracing the central portion of luminaire 118 is a band 121 carrying any desirable design thereon and preferably secured I at its opposite ends to bars 115 and 116.

In this instance I prefer to mount the mirrored surface of my fixture in adifferent man} ner still, as is more clearly shown in Figure 10. The lumina-ire 118may be formed from either glass or some yieldable material as, for example, synthetic resi'n'and casing 151-to gether with bulb 24 is installed in wall 112 in'a manner substantially identical to'that At the its described above. To one side of cavity in wall 112, I provide hinges 49, leaves 50 thereof beingconnected to wall 112 in any suitable manner as, for example, by screws 51. The other leaves 52 of hinges 49 are connected to frame 113 of mirror-member 114 so that mirror-member 114 extends Over cavity 150 and consequently casing 151 swings about a vertical axis toward and away from cavity 150. The other side of frame 113 may be secured to wall 112 in any desired manner, although I preferably provide a screw 53 extending through frame 113 and into wall 112. The character of screws 53 and 51 may vary according to the material from which wall 112 is formed. Thus if wall 112 is formed from wood, I employ wood screws for this purpose and if the wall is formed from stone, plaster or the like, threaded sleeves 54 and 55 may be inserted in the wall to receive screws 51 and '53 respectively. p p

In this instance, luminaire 118 has preferably formed on its open side an annular flange 56,'the periphery of which is of greater magnitude than opening 117 in mirrormember 114. Secured to the inner side of mirror-member 12, or that side adjacent casing 151, are a series of soft metal clips 57 having free portions 58 capable of being bent toward and away from opening 117. To install luminaire 118 in mirror-member 114, frame 113is swung to its open position, or a position substantially at an angle to the plane surface of wall 112, and the luminaire is thence inserted in opening 117 from the rear side thereof or that side adjacent casing 151. When flange 56 engages the inner side of mirror-member 114, the free portions 58 of clips 57 are bent downwardly upon flange 56 so that the flange together with luminaire 118 is clamped between the clips and mirror-member 114. Consequently luminaire 118 is firm- 1y secured to mirror-member 114 and, after so positioning the parts,frame 113 may be closed and screw 53 inserted to hold the framein its closed position. The fixture is now in readiness for operation in a manner substantially similar to that described above and, subsequently, repairs, changes or the like may be made by loosening screw 53 and swinging frame 113 back upon hinge 49 as an axis. Although this method of connecting luminaire 118 to mirror-member 114 has many peculiar advantages for this construction, I may employ some of the constructions described above under certain circumstances.

Referring now to Figure 6, there is shown a lighting fixture generally in dicatedat 132. Fixture 132 includes a frame 133 connected to I a mirror-member 134, these parts being secured to a wall 135 by suitable screws 136, or the like, extending through the frame and into the wall. In this case, I prefer to have a plain luminaire 137 extending from and secured to mirror-member 134 with no visible means of support, as for example, metallic housings, bars and the like.

Luminaire 137 maybe formed fro'm either yieldable or non-yieldable material, although I prefer to use a yieldable material such as synthetic resin. When luminaire 137 is so formed, I may secure it to mirror-member 134 in'a manner substantially similar to the construction shown in Figure 9.

Here luminaire 137 has two outwardly extending flanges 46a and 465 formed upon the opposite longitudinal edges of the open end thereof. Suitable brackets 47 are secured to casing 153, having legs 48 extending inwardly toward bulb 24 and beyond the edge of opening 138 in mirror member 134. Bulb 24 is connected to a socket arranged in casing 153 in a manner substantially similar to that shown in Figure 8. e

To insert luminaire 137 in mirror-member 134, pressure is exerted, as by the fingers, on the opposite sides thereof to force the edges bearing flanges 46a and 46b toward each other. The luminaire is then inserted until it lies flush against legs 48 of brackets 47 when the pressure is released. Upon such release, the luminaire assumes its normal shape and thus flanges 46a and 46b extend outwardly over the inner side of mirrormember 134 to hold'the luminaire securely in its operative position. When it is found desirable to remove the luminaire, as is convenient for purposes of repairing-the various parts within casing 153, this maybe done conveniently by applying pressure to the op posite sides thereof to release fianges 46a and 46?) from mirror-member134 and subsequently pulling the luminaire therefrom. Q

When current is supplied to bulb 24 so that light emanates from "luminaire 137, an image J appears in mirror-member 134. When the luminaire is so lighted, an observer looking at fixture 132 from any angle to the plane surface thereof, obtains the impression that he is seeing a luminaire complete in all three dimensions. This impression is created by the combined view of a portion of luminaire 137 together with imaged, the complement thereof. Furthermore, when so viewed, the illusion produced is that luminaire 137 is suspended in a space with no'visible means of support. As luminaire 137 may take any of a number of shapes, it is possible to produce anunlimited number of novel effects wherein these Various shapes of luminaires seem to remote to be illuminated, and that the wiring, source of light, and rear easing therefor, are concealed from view, thus precluding any possibility of defeatin the illusion created by the outer reflecting surface with which the luminaire is associated. The illusion is further insured by the fact that the fixture is permanently located in a vertical position and that a reflecting surface for the luminaire of sufficiently large area to fully reflect the luminaire is provided.

It should also be noted that the reflecting surface for the luminaire is preferably exposed and that the luminaire is substantially in contact with the reflecting surface so that the image of the luminaire reflected on said surface is not only complementary to but a continuity of the luminaire.

It should also be noted that the source of light is arranged to throw its rays toward the luminaire and that the rear reflector is arranged to reflectother rays toward the luminaire. Thus the major efficiency of the light rays is diffused through the luminaire for illuminating purposes.

It should also be noted that the reflecting surface with which the luminaire is associated serves not only to reflect the luminaire and thus produce the illusion referred to but also increases the illuminating efliciency of the light which is diffused through the luminaire.

It will thus be seen that there is provided several thoroughly practical and eflicient devices in which the several objects hereinbefore described, as well as many others, are successfully achieved.

In the following claims, the term wall or wall member, unless otherwise qualified, is intended and is to be understoodto include any of the bounding or enclosing parts of a room, such as the side wall 11 of Figure 1 or the ceiling 85 of Figure 8, and I do not wish, therefore, to be restricted to any particular part of the enclosure.

As many possible embodiments may be made of the above invention and as many changes might be made in the embodiment above set forth, it is to be understood that all matter hereinbefore set forth or shown in the accompanying drawings is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

I claim:

1. A lighting fixture for illuminating purposes comprising, in combination, a wall member having a reflecting surface and adapted for incorporation in a wall of a building, a translucent light diffusing shade extending from said member and contact ing with the reflecting surface to reflect on the reflecting surface substantially a complementary and continuing image of said shade, and a source of light behind said shade adapted to direct light rays through said shade, said sourceof light being concealed from view, whereby light is diffused through said shade and its member having a reflecting surface, a: translucent light diffusing shadeextending from said reflecting surface to reflect on said surface substantially a complementary and continuing image of said shade, and a source of light behind said shade and adapted to direct rays of light'through said shade, said 7 elements being incorporated in the wall in such manner asto conceal all elements 10- ated behind the shade and the first-mentioned1nember, whereby light is diffused through said shade while giving the appearance of being diffused through said shade and its complementary image.

3. A lighting fixture comprising, in combination, a wall having a reflecting surface, a translucent shade extending from saidwall and disposed in direct engagement therewith, andmeans comprising electric illuminating equipment disposed immediately behind said shade and adapted to throw light through said shade, said means being concealed from iew, whereby upon the operation of said last-mentioned means substantially a complementary and continuing image of said shade is formed on said wall to create the illusion of a complete and symmetrical whole suspended in a space.

4. In lighting apparatus, in combination, a wall, a panel member incorporated in said wall and whose exposed surface is a reflector, a translucent shade extending from said panel member and in direct engagement with said surface, and means forming a light source located behind said shade and adapted to throw light through said shade whereby upon the operation of said lastmentioned means substantially a complemen- T tary and continuing image of said shade appears on said reflecting surface to create the illusion of a symmetrical shade.

5. A lighting fixture for illuminating purposes comprising, in combination, a member having a reflecting surface, a translucent light diffusing shade extending from said reflecting surface in such manner as to reflect on said surface substantially a complementary and continuing image of said shade, a. source of light behind said shade, and a reflecting member behind the source of light; said elements being incorporated in a wall in such manner as to conceal all elements lo cated behind the shade and the first-mentioned member, whereby light is diffused through said shade while giving the appearance of being diffused through said shade and its complementary image.

6. A lighting fixture for illuminating pur- "LIOO poses comprising, in combination, a member having an exposed reflecting surface, a translucent light diffusing member in the form of one-half of a light surrounding shade ex- '5 tending from said reflecting surface in such manner as to reflect on said surface a complementar' and continuing image of said member, a source of li ht behind said light diffusing member and positioned and arranged to direct some of its light rays toward said light diffusing member, and a reflecting member behind the source of light to direct other of its light rays toward said light diffusing member, said elements being incorporated in a Wall in such manner as to conceal all elements locatedebehind the first and second mentioned members, whereby an efficient illuminating light is diffused through said light diffusing member while giving the appearance of being diffused through said member and its complementary image, and the illuminating efficiency of the source of light is increased by the reflecting surfaces. 7 In testimony whereof, I have signed my name to this specification this 21st day of August, 1931.

LINDSLEY SCHEPMOES.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2469072 *Apr 30, 1946May 3, 1949Lerman JosephCorner wall lamp
US2800577 *Aug 23, 1955Jul 23, 1957Lawrence M BlockCorner light
US5961205 *Jan 24, 1997Oct 5, 1999Lovell; Allan R.Removably mountable light for wall and corner
Classifications
U.S. Classification362/307, 362/147
International ClassificationF21V33/00
Cooperative ClassificationF21V33/00
European ClassificationF21V33/00