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Publication numberUS1910129 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 23, 1933
Filing dateFeb 14, 1931
Priority dateFeb 14, 1931
Publication numberUS 1910129 A, US 1910129A, US-A-1910129, US1910129 A, US1910129A
InventorsSevery Melvin L
Original AssigneeVocalsevro Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Expression-control device for musical instruments
US 1910129 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 23, 1933. M. L. SEVERY L90129 EXPRESSION CONTROL DEVICE FOR MUSICALk INSTRUMENTS Filed Feb. 14, 1931 4 Sheets-Sheet l @valigia/fzln@ '/2 snventor: 77ZeZz/hz Z. euwy,

Gtforncgsa May 23, 19331 M. L.. sEvERY 1,910,129

EXPRESSION CONTROL DEVICE FOR MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS Filed Feb. 14, 1931 4 Sheets-Sheen 2 ctromcgs r May 23, 1933 M. L.. sEvERY 1,910,129

EXPRESSION CONTROL DEVICE FOR MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS Filed Feb. 14, 1951 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Buncntor: WMM/L' @bue/ May 23, 1933. M. L, sl-:vERY 1,910,129

EXPRESSION CONTROL DEVICE FOR MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS Filed Feb. .14, 1951 4l Sheets-Sheet 4 1% b w *uw .irq D Il! DIECI@ LSE! Relay/5,

Patented May 23, 1933 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE MEL'VIN L. SEVERY, OF LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA, ASSIGNOR T0 THE VOCALSEVEO COMPANY, OF LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNA, A CORPORATION OF DELAWARE EXPRESSION-CONTROL DEVICE FOR MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS Application led February 14, 1931.

This invention relates more particularly, but not wholly, to means for controlling the artistic expression in the rendition of musical selections, and it lends itself most readily to those types of instrument wherein the loudness or volume of tone is, or ma f be, electrically controlled. Some of these types I have shown in U. S. Patent No. 1,464,729 granted vto me August 14, 1923; in U. S. Patent No. 1,733,630 granted to me October 29, 1929; and in my co-pending application Serial No. 472,969 `filed August 4, 1930, now Patent No. 1,899,884 dated February 28, 1933.

The invention finds its most perfect application in those instruments which are able most rapidly to vary the loudness or volume of their tones.

An important object of the invention is to give the player of an instrument a fuller and more complete control thereof than has hitherto been possible, enabling him to secure the constantly changing gradations in volume necessary to the nest results, without at the same time sacrificing other desirable features.

ln the pipe organ, tor example, it has long been customary to play a bass section of the instrument through mechanism operated by the feet, and also to regulate the volume or loudness by foot-operated means. As a result of tais arrangement it has been necessary to have pedal shoes to operate the swell shutters (serving more or less to smother the tone), which shall remain wherever placed, so that they may be operated from 'time to time when a foot of the player is momentarily free for purposes of readjustment. Organ music consequently pays so dearly for its pedal bass that its renditions are often wellnigh expressionless save as to time, pitch, and tonal coloring. The remedying of this defect is one of the chief purposes of my invention.

Another purpose of my invention is the Serial No. 515,837.

ready and instantaneous operation of certain devices which will enable the player to produce beautiful efects, without requiring impossible activities of his already pre-empted feet and hands.

A still further purpose of my invention is to provide means which, because of its relatively insignificant mass and for other reasons, shall be so instantly responsive as to constitute an expressive means of the very highest order.

Another object of the invention is to enable the player to accomplish these results without the use of his hands or his feet which are occupied in other ways, the mechanism which I provide being operated by the mouth, chin, or head of the player.

Various embodiments of the invention are illustrated in the accompanying drawings. in which: l

Fig. 1 is a front elevation, partly in section and partly broken away, showing` the internal construction of one form of my device;

Fig. 1"DL is a detail perspective view of the rear portion of the device shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 2 is a view, partly in section, of certain parts of Fig. 1 seen in plan;

Fig. 3 is a. detail view showing the construction of the upper leftwardly extended member of Fig. 1, seen in plan and with the top removed.

Fig. 4 is a diagrammatic view of an eX- pression-control mechanism adapted for use with my present invention;

Fig. 5 is a diagrammatic view of a sostenuto mechanism especially adapted to be controlled by the present invention;

Figs. 6, 7 and S illustrate alternative mams for holding and operating my device;

Fig. 9 is a diagrammatic view showing the principal elements of the musical instrument, and the connections with the device of Fig. 1.

In the embodiment illustrated in Fig. 1,

C5 Th which is designed to be held in and operated by the mouth of the player, the device comprises a tube 1 having oppositely disposed longitudinal slits throughout most of its length, and a helical spring 2 working freely in said tube, said spring operating expansively to force downwardly the lower leftwardly-extending member 3. This member 3 is securely fastened to the vertically reciprocating rod 4 by a pin 10, and serves to move the rod against the action of spring 2. Ball bearings 5 and 6 at the top and bottom of the tube respectively, serve to position rod 4 and to render its reciprocation smooth and easy. These bearings are pressed into ends 7 and 8 of the tube 1. The upper leftwardly extending member 9 has its right-hand end inserted in the slit in tube 1, where it is securely fastcned,`making it rigid with said tube.

The inner extremity of member 3 is extended downwardly and carries two metallic brushes, which may conveniently be made in one piece divided into two main portions 21, 22, the portion 21 being bifurcated at its free end as seen in Fig. 1, only the bifurcated portion 21 being visible in Fig. 1. The prongs or forks of brush 21 are of slightly differing lengths, so that one or the other prong shall at all times be in contact with one or another of the metallic sections of a rheostator commutator 11 though the other rests upon or is in the act of crossing the insulation between successive blocks or sections. A cable 12 carries the wires leading to the rheostat sections, (see Fig. 9), these wires being individually insulated from one another in any usual way. The cable is shown as broken off in Fig. 1. The rheostat 11 is firmly held at top and bottom by extensions 13, 14 from the top and bottom caps respectively of the tube 1. A detachable housing 15 encloses the rear or commutator part of the device.

The extending members 3 and 9 are grooved at 16 and 17 respectively, to permit of securely positioning and holding them bctween the teeth of the player. As seen in Figs. 1 and 3, movable elbow levers 18, each having a portion extending from either side of member 9, are provided for convenience of operation by the players tongue. A removable cover 19 seals the upper exposed portion of member 9.

s seen in Figs. 1, 1 and 2, the rheostat 11 is divided into three parallel vertical portions lla, 11b and 11, the portion 11'l being further divided horizontally into sections 2O electrically insulated from each other and from the continuous portions 11" and 11. The section 11b serves as a continuous conductor of the current, which passes to or from the insulated blocks or sections 20 of the rheostat by way of the brushes 21, 22. e portion 11C constitutes a support for the portions 11 and 11", and also acts as a spacing element between the extensions 13, 14. The wires 12a by which the contact blocks 20 are connected with cable 12 pass through openings in the member 11c which may be of such size as to prevent contact of the wires with said member, or the wires may be otherwise insulated therefrom. In Fig. 1a the cable 12 is shown emerging at the top of the rheostat member 11, but it is of course immaterial whether said cable passes out at the bottom as in Fig. l or at the top as in Fig. l.

Since it is merely a matter of choice whether the rheostat 11 be connected up 011e way or the other, it will be assumed that in Fig. 1 it is so connected that the closure of the players jaws produces a fortissimo effeet, while relaxing and opening them produces a dimenuendo effect, the volume being the least obtainable in operation when the spring 2 is extended to its maximum. Current enters the device through a wire 12a in cable 12, which wire is secured to the continuous metallic strip 11h of rheostat 11 upon which the brush 22 bears (see Fig. la), this brush being secured to and moving with member 3 so that, in operation, said brush is always in electrical connection with a source of current. Since the brush 21 which is seen in Fig. 1 is aways electrically connected with brush 22, as shown in Fig. 1, it may be considered as one brush suitably pronged for traversing the two vertically separated parts of the commutator, to the end that any wire connected to a commutator section 2O will be given current whenever the brush 21 touches it in its upward or downward movement. It is only necessary, therefore, to wire the individual sides of electromagnets, each to the proper commutator section 20, to enable the player to secure any volume desired by the mere opening or closing of his mouth, as will be more fully explained later in connection with other figures. Wires 35, 36 seen at the upper end of the device are for the purpose, as will be later explained, of enabling the operator to complete electric circuits by a touch of his tongue upon either of the levers 18, only one of which is visible in Fig. 1.

Referring to Fig. 3, which shows the construction of the mechanism in the outer section .of member 9, the elbow levers 18 are pivoted at 23 and 24 respectively, their ends 25, 26 being adapted to force conducting tongues 27, 28 into electrical contact with the strips of conducting metal 29, 30 to which wires 35. 36 are joined, whenever the players tongue is pressed against the exposed portions of said levers 18. Stop pins 23, 24a limit the outward movement of the inner ends of levers 18 under the action of the spring conducting tongues 27, 28. The

tongues 27 28 are preferably provided with 130 silver tips, and are in electrical connection at their iXed ends with a common feed or common return, a resulteasily brought about by putting one pole of the currentsource upon the metallic parts yof the whole mechanism. This is the method made use of in the drawings. The tongues 27, 28 are secured at one end to a member 31 of nonconducting material, the (3o-acting conducting metallic strips 29, 30 being secured at or near the right-hand end lof member 31. G4 indicates removable side casings. As seen in Fig. 1 the lower portion 32 of member 9 is metallic, and serves to conduct the current on the connected metallic parts of .the device to the tongues 27, 28, which are in contact with said portion 32 at their left-hand ends.

Fig. 4 is a schematic layout of an eX- pression-'control system and associated parts fully described in my co-pending lapplication Serial No. 472,969, tiled August 4, 1930,

and shown here merely to make clear the action of my present invention. Speaking magnets 33, 34 are grouped together, as to the expression control, in the relation of musical seconds, 33 representing note 13 and 34 note 14 of the key manual, which is to say, C and C# of the gamut. Rocking members 37 are actuated by electromagnets 38, 39, 40 etc., the circuit of each of said magnets being completed through the action of the device herein described, as will be more fully pointed out later. Contact lingers 41, one for each pair of speaking magnets 33, 34, co-act with the rocking members 37. Resistances 42 are brought into or cut out of the circuit through the action of the rocking members 37, each rocking member commonly operating upon as many resistances las `are required for all the notes of the instrument. As shown, one-half as many resistances as there are notes on the manual would be brought in, all of which is clearly set forth in my copending application Serial No. 472,969.

All that is essential to an understanding ot the present invention is a realization of the tact that the volume of the instrument throughout is determined by which one, if any, of the rocking members 37 is co-acting with its associated line of contact ingers 41. lf none of the rocking members are in -action, then the `rcurrent is at its minimum and likewise the volume of the instrument is at its lowest point, since in this condition current from the generator 43 must pass by the common wire 44 to the lowest resistance, and thence through all the other resistances in line above it, in order to reach its associated pair of speaking magnets 33, 34, thus reducing the current to its minimum. Then any of the rocking members 37 midway of the extreme members are brought into action, all the resistances below the acting member are cut out. lVhen the upper rock-- ing member is brought into action, all of the resistances are cut out, thus giving the full current and full volume, as will readily be seen.

Each rocking member 37 is provided with a contact member 45 which, when operated, contacts with a co-acting` finger 46, said tingers being each connected by a wire 46a, 4Gb, 46C, etc., with `a small lamp 47. The lighting of these lamps indicates to the perfor-mer, especially when beginning a selection, which rocking member 37 is down, and the volume with which the .instrument will speak when a key is pressed. rllhe lingers 45 are in electrical Contact at all times with the common wire 44 leading from the minus pole of the generator, while the iight-hand leads of the lamps 47 are all in multiple upon the plus wire 43 leading from the generator 43. It will be seen, therefore, that if the third rocking member 37 (beginning from t ie top) be actuated, its associated contact fingers 45, 46 will come together and the third lamp 47 will be lighted, also counting from `the top in this ligure.

In Fig. 5 the keys 49 of a key manual are shown, each having small armatures 5() attach-ed to the same. When one of the magnets 51 is energized and a key 49 and its armature 50 are pressed down irmly upon said magnet, this construction prevents the return of the key until the circuit in said magnet is broken, this being a very excellent form of sostenuto device. A switch 52 opens and closes the circuit oi generator 43 through the energization and cle-energization respectively ot a magnet 53. A manually operable switch 54 controls the cutting in or out of the current, as desired. lilith conditions as shown the magnets 51 are all energized, and any keys of the manual which are pressed firmly down will be retained in that position through the action of the mechanism here disclosed, until magnet is energized, as will loe more fully eX- plained hereinafter.

Fig. 6 illustrates a form et my device in which the reciprocating rod 4 is forced upwardly by its associated spring and downwardly by the chin of the player, pressed upon the padded disk 55, either by a movement of the head, or by opening the mouth and thus forcing said disk downward by lowering the chin. A supporting rod 5G conveniently extends 'from the back over the players shoulder, and is bent downwardly to support the slidably adji'lstable arm 57 maintained in position upon rod 56 by the set-screw 58. The cable 12 may conveniently be secured to the rod 56 at 59, the whole arrangement being designed to place the device in position for easy control, yet not in a position to interfere with the free movement of the players arms in reaching for stops, in playing the manual, or in arranging his music. Care is `also taken that the device shall in no way obstruct the line o f vision of the performer in a manner to interfere with his work.

Fig. 7 illustrates an alternative placement of the device shown in Fig. 6, the rod 56 rising vertically at the back of the player, and thc padded disk 55 being operated by pressing the back of the head against it.

In Flg. 8 is shown a means of fastenin any of the forms of device herein describe to the players clothing after the familiar practice of telephone transmitters. This consists of a supporting yoke 61 to which the device is secured by an arm 62, a strap 63` fastened at each of the upper corners of yoke 61 serving to hold said yoke and the attached control device in position upon the person of the player. The form of control device shown in Fig. 6 is here illustrated, but it is to be understood that that shown in Fig. 1 and operable by the mouth, might also be fastened in this manner, or in the manner shown at Fig. 6.

Fig. 9 illustrates diagrammatically the principal elements of a musical instrument of the type set forth in my copending application Serial No. 472,969, before mentioned, showing also the connection therewith of the wires 12'i passing into the cable 12 of Fig. 1. Two keys 65, 66, belonging to the operative system of the instrument, and the magnets 33, 34 which respond normally to the pressure of said keys and cause the speaking of the pipes 67, 68, are shown, said keys in this instance sounding the thirteenth and fourteenth notes of the key-manual. From the minus pole of generator 43 the common wire 44 connects with all the rocker mechanisms 37, these rockers being shown in perspective and broken away to indicate their longitudinal continuity. The contact fingers 41, one for each pair of speaking magnets, and the resistances 42 which are brought into or out of circuit through the action of the rocking members 37, are illustrated as in Fig. 4, the uppermost rocker 37 contacting directly and without the interposition of any resistance with its contact tongue 41. The relay magnets 69, 70, also controlled by the keys 65, 66, constitute part of the partial-mixing side of the instrument as set forth in my aforesaid application, Serial No. 472,969, each of said magnets being associated with a double row of contacts 71, 72. The partial-mixing rockers are represented diagrammatically at 73, 74, a wire 75 connecting each of said rockers with the generator 43, and a condenser 76 being employed across the contacts 71, 72 of the prime of first partial where undiminisher current strength is most often used. Wires 77, 78 connect the contacts 71, 72 controlling the prime or first partial of each double relay, with one pole of the speaking magnets 33, 34, the other pole of said magnets being connected by the wires 79, 80 with the expression-control s stem and therethrough vwith the cable 12. t is to be understood of course that each of the. other partials in use represented by the pairs of contacts 71, 72 of each row is similarly connected with the proper speaking magnet, and with the expression-control mechanism, but in order to simplify the showing, only the connection from the prime or first partial is here illustrated.

The operation of the device will be readily understood from the foregoing explanation. When a player wishes to begin a selection the device shown, say, at Fig. 1, is placed in proper position between the teeth, the telltale lights shown in Fig. 4 are then observed, and the mouth is closed, thereby sliding the brush 21 upwardly on rheostat 11 until the lamp corresponding to the volume desired is lighted. In this condition of affairs a common feed flows to the case of the instrument and its uninsulated parts; thence to the continuous strip 11b of the rheostat; thence to the brush 22 resting on said strip and across to the brush 21, as seen in Figs. 1 and 1. From the brush 21 the current flows to the contact section 20 of rheostat 11 upon which said brush rests; thence to the cable 12 and to the individual pole of the magnet operating the rocking member 37 associated with the rheostat section 20 which is passing the current; thence through the hellx of said magnet to the common wire 44 to which its other pole is joined, and so back to generator 43. This completes the circuit, the rocking member 37 associated with said magnet being thus pulled down and causing the insertion in the line of its own resistance 42 and all the resistances thereabove, and the sounding of any notes played, at the volume corresponding with the amount of current thus permitted to flow through the speaking magnets 33, 34.

If, now, the player desires to go from the softest passages to the loudest, and then instantly back to the softest again, this may be accomplished by going from the wide open to the closed and then back to the wide open conditions of the mouth, as will readily be seen. However, as this is a very effective feature, I provide a yet quicker way of go ing from any volume, determined by the degree of openness of the mouth, to the maximum volume, and, if desired, instantly back again, and repeating this with the rapidity of manual fingering, as many times as may be desired, just by a movement of the tongue upon the appropriate elbow lever 18. The method of operation is as follows:

The contact tongue 27 is always in electrical contact with the feed line from the generator, and when the players tongue presses upon lever 18 so that tongue 27 is crowded upon its co-acting plate 29, current flows from wire 36 to the wire 12a leading from the uppermost rheostat contact section 2O into the cable, whence it passes to the individual pole of the electromagnet 38 operating the uppermost rocking member 37. rl`his rocking member is immediately pressed down upon its co-acting contacts 41, and thus supplies current unobstructed by resistance, to the speaking magnets then in operation.

If it is desired to use the sostenuto in, say, an arpeggio passage, the operator has only to play the notes he desires to have sustained,

deeply enough for them to be seized and held by the magnets 51 shown in Fig. 5, and then, when it is desired to release the notes, it will only be necessary to touch the tongue to the other elbow lever 18, which will place the conducting tongue 28 (Fig. 3) in contact with its co-acting plate 30, whence current will flow from the feed line through wire 35 and into the cable 12, whence it will pass to one pole of the magnet 53 (Fig. 5), through its coil, and back to the generator 43. This completes the circuit of the magnet 53, energizing it, and causing it to attract its armature and open the line of magnets 51 serving to hold down the keys 49, thus permitting the keys to move upward and to cause the opening of the circuits of the speaking magnets.

I have shown but two functions apart from the usual variation of volume, but it should be understood that I may use several more, where occasion requires, since more than two of the levers 18 may be employed, it being obvious that so facile a member as the tongue could operate several more. Moreover, where only two levers are used I do not confine lnyself to these particular two, for it will be obvious that any function which may be performed through the closing and opening of an electric circuit may be attained, such as the calling into play of tonal set-ups previously arranged or otherwise; the coupling or uncoupling of manuals; the bringing into action or the controlling of a tremolo mechanism; or any one or more of various functions.

It is obvious that the body of the device may be modified in formk and appearance without departing from the spirit of my invention, and such modifications as expedience, facility of manufacture, or actual use may suggest, are contemplated herein.

In the foregoing description and in the drawings I have described and illustrated several embodiments of my invention respectively operable by movement either of the entire head or of some member thereof, as the chin or the tongue. As these several embodiments effect the same purpose or function, the expression operable by the head of a performer, used in the claims, is intended to include these several embodiments.

I claim 1. The herein described expression control device for a musical instrument, comprising a variable resistance mechanism; an actuator therefor; and means for movably supporting said actuator in co-active relation with the heao of a player.

2. An expression control system for musical instruments comprising, in combination, electrical means for controlling the expression of the musical utterances played; a movable actuator therefor; and means for supporting said movable actuator in coactive relation with the head of a player.

3. In an expression control device for a musical instrument, means for varying the loudness of the tones produced; rheostat means including a. multiple-contact member and a brush member shiftable relatively thereto; a source of electric energy and connections therewith for actuating said firstnamed means; a movable actuator for said rheostat means; and means for supporting said actuator in co-active relation with a portion of the players head.

l. In an expression control for a musical instrument, means for varying the loudness of the tones produced for purposes of musical expression; rheostat means for controlling the first-named means; a movable actuator for said rheostat means; and means for supporting said actuator in co-active relation with the head of the player.

5. In an expression control device for musical instruments, means for varying the loudness of the tones produced, said means comprising a rheostat member and a brush member; a source of electric energy and connections therewith; speaking magnets in circuit with said rheostat member; resistance means operable by said brush and rheostat members; electric lamps in circuit with said resistance means; and means for simultaneously closing the resistance circuit and the lamp circuit.

6. In an expression control device for an electrically operable musical instrument, means for sounding tones of desired pitches; rheostat means for varying the loudness of the tones produced; resistance means operable by said rheostat means; electric lamps in circuit with said resistance means; and means, operable independently of the players hands and feet, for operating said rheostat means and simultaneously closing the resistance circuit and the lamp circuit.

7. An expressioii-control device for musical instruments, comprising a tube, a rod within said tube; a spring encircling said rod; lateral extensions carried by said tube, one of said extensions being fixed and the other movable against the pressure of the spring, toward and from the fixed extension; elbow levers and electrical contacts carried by the fixed extension, said contacts being operable by the elbow levers; a rheostat having a continuous and a subdivided section, each section insulated from the others; electric connections between the contacts of the fixed extension and the subdivisions of the rheostat; brushes carried by the movable extension; and a source of electric energy in circuit with said rheostat.

8. An expression-control device for musical instruments, comprising a tube; a rod within said tube; a spring encircling said rod; a fixed lateral extension at one end of said tube; a second lateral extension carried by said tube and movable toward and from the fixed extension against the pressure of said spring; elbow levers carried by the fixed extension; electric contacts carried by said fixed extension and operable by said elbow levers; a rheostat havin a portion subdivided into sections electrlcally insulated from one another, and a continuous metallic portion electrically insulated from said subdivided portion; Wires connecting the contacts carried by the fixed lateral extension with the subdivisions of the rheostat; brushes carried by the movable extension and bearing respectively upon the subdivisions and upon the continuous metallic portion of said rheostats; and a source of electric energy connecting by separate conductors with the subdivisions of the rheostat and with the continuous conducting member thereof.

9. An expression-control device for musical instruments, comprising a tube; a spring-pressed rod within said tube; lateral extensions carried by said tube, one movable toward the other a ainst the pressure of the spring; a source o electric energy; a rheostat having a portion subdivided into sections electrically insulated from one another, and a continuous metallic portion electrically insulated from said subdivided portion; levers within said fixed extension, each operable by the tongue; contacts within said fixed extension, in electrical connection with the subdivisions of said rheostat, and closable b said levers; brushes carried by the movab e extension, bearing respectively upon the subdivisions and upon the continuous conducting portion of said rheostat; speaking magnets in circuit with said rheostat; rocking members carrying contacts operable by the movement of said members; electromagnels for operating said rocking members; a resistance in the circuit of each speaking magnet; and electric lamps, each in circuit with a different one of said rocking members, the simultaneous closing of the contacts operated by the rocking members serving to complete the resistance circuit and the lamp circuit.

10. In a musical instrument, the combination with an expression-control device operable by the head of the performer, said control device consisting essentially of a rheostat, of a sostenuto mechanism comprising armatures attached to keys of the manual; a. normally energized electromagnet associated with each such armature for holding down the depressed key or keys; a source of current in circuit with the rheostat of the control device and with the sostenuto magnet; a switch for opening and closing the circuit from said source; and an electromagnet in a normally open electric circuit serving, when energized, to open said switch, de-energize the sostenuto magnets, and thereb release the depressed key or keys.

11. n combination with an expressioncontrol device for musical instruments, comprising a rheostat provided with a carr ing slide and having a spring-sustained dis by which to actuate or adjust said rheostat; an upright post encircled by said slide and upon which the slide may be adjusted; means for holding said slide and rheostat in any desired adjustment on said post; and a cable carried by said post, extending to the rheostat, and containing wires extending from the rheostat to the instrument controlled thereby, said Wires being in circuit with a source of electric energy.

12. An expression-control actuator operable by the head of a performer, said device comprising a rheostat having a spring-sustained disk by which to actuate said rheostat; a support for said control device serving to hold the same in proximity and proper relation to the head of a performer, whereby the performer is enabled to actuate the control device by a mere movement of the head.

13. An expression-control actuator for musical instruments comprising two members one mounted on the other and movable relatively thereto; and means for sup orting one of said relatively movable mem ers in position to permit actuation of the other of said members by a portion of the head of the player, while in playing position.

14. The combination of claim 13 further characterized in that said supporting means comprises a member engaging the neck of the player and positioning the device for actuation by the players chin.

15. The combination of claim 13 further characterized in that said supportin means comprises a portion which is inserti le into the players mouth and which, when inserted; positions the device for actuation by opening and closing movements of the players mouth.

16. An expression-control actuator for musical instruments comprising two members movable one relatively to the other to effect the control, portions of said relatively movable members being insertible in the players mouth and being then capable of actuation by opening and closing movements of his mouth.

17. The combination of claim 16 further characterized in that one of said nsertible members is provided with L second control mechanism operabie by the players tongue.

18. An expression-control actuator :for musical instruments comprising, in combination, L member arranged to be supported 0n the body of the player and a member movable relatively thereto and operable by a portion of the head of the player.

In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification.

MELVIN L. SEVERY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7563975Sep 13, 2006Jul 21, 2009Mattel, Inc.Music production system
Classifications
U.S. Classification84/347, 984/378, 84/701, 84/1, 984/321
International ClassificationG10H1/055, G10H5/00
Cooperative ClassificationG10H1/0558, G10H5/005
European ClassificationG10H1/055R, G10H5/00C