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Publication numberUS1910251 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 23, 1933
Filing dateDec 9, 1931
Priority dateDec 9, 1931
Publication numberUS 1910251 A, US 1910251A, US-A-1910251, US1910251 A, US1910251A
InventorsJoha Elmer N
Original AssigneeReliable Knitting Works
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Knitted foot covering and method of making the same
US 1910251 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. N. JOHA 1,910,251

KNITTED FOOT COVERING AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME 7 May 23, 1933.

Filed Dec. 9, 1931 Patented May, 23, 1933 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE ELMER N. JOHA, OF WAUWATOSA, WISCONSIN, ASSIGNOR To RELIABLE KNITTING WORKS, OF MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN, A CORPORATION OF WISCONSIN KNITTED FOOT COVERING AND Application filed December My invention relates to improvements in knitted foot coverings and methods of mak ing the same.

The primary object of my inventlon 1s to 5 provide means whereby a kn1tted blank may be produced and folded in such a manner as to provide a foot covering having a wel'l defined sole portion of adequate width for complete comfort and which may be formed into a slipper or a slipper like covering wlth minimumcutting and stitching of the knitted fabric.v

A further object is to provide a knitted foot covering in which the edges to be stitched together will all be selvage edges, the knitted material being out only in that portion which will be covered by a bindlng to form the opening through whlch the foot of the wearer is inserted.

It is also my object to provide means whereby a strip of knitted material maybe continuously formed upon a flat knltting machine from which sections may be cut to form integral blanks from which the entire foot covering may be produced by folding and stitching selvage marginstogether in a novel manner to form a complete shoe, slipper, or similar foot covering of a highly ornamental appearance and 1mproved utility.

In the drawing:

Figure 1 is a view of the knitted blank as it appears when out from a continuous strip of fabric. knitted upon a flatknitting machine equipped Withfa rack lever. Figure 2 is a view of the blank shown 1n Figure 1 as it appears when partially folded and portions of the ends of the blank con-, 40 neeted above the instep.

Figure 3 is a view of the same when completely shaped into slipper form, stitched and bound.

4 Figure 1 is an isometric view of the slipper shown in Figure 3 when tilted .to expose the heeland sole portions.

Figure 5 is. aview of the blank as it appears when partiallyffolded and cut preparatory to the formation of a foot warmer, Le,

a covering intended to be worn over a shoe METHOD or MAKING THE SAME 9. 1921. Serial No. 579,923.

or interposed between. shoes and outer coverings such as galoshe's.

Figure 6 is a view of the completed foot warmer in position for use.

Figure7lis a fragmentary view showing a, modification.

Like parts are identified by the same reference characters throughout the several views.

In the manufacture of myimproved foot coverings I first prepare a knitted blank having "zig-zag side margins forming pairs of transverse zones of differing widths, the end zones 1 and 2 being wider than the inter mediate zones 3 and 4. The zones of each pair have margins at one side of the blank. which converge inwardly to form a triangular open recess and the margins correspond in ly extend convergingly at the other side .of the blank-to form atriangular lateral projectionfrom the body or'longitudinallyextending central. portion. U

While any strip of fiat knitted material may be cut to form a bl'anksubstantially as shown in Figure 1-, I prefer to employ a fiat knitting machine equipped-with a rack lever and to knit the blank in zig-zag form by shifting the rack lever at the proper..in-. tervals whereby the side edges of the blank and of each transverse zone thereof will. be selvage edges requiring no binding to pre vent them from unraveling. Blanks knitted in this form will have the well known zigzag or herring bone stitch in which the ribs follow oblique lines parallelwith the margins of the respective zones and meet with those of the next zone to form a well defined transversely extending line produced by the reversal of the rack lever. Such blanks may be formed by knitting a continuous zig-zag strip and then cutting the strip as indicated at 5 and 6 in Figure 1, whereby to produce blanks having a pair of wide zones at each end and a single pair of relatively narrow interposed zones. f y 9;

.In order that such .blanksmay be cut from a continuous strip, it is obviousthatin the knitting of such a strip two pairs of con- .nected wide zones 'will be produced for every single intermediate pair of narrow 100 zones in order that the strip may be out between the pairs of wide zones, thus leaving a pair of wide zones at each end of the severed blanks. In each blank having the herring bone stitch the ribs in successive zones are pitched in the opposite direction from those in the adjacent zones and are substantially parallel in the alternate zones, of which there are three, and the ribs" of the middle zone are shorter in length than those in the other two.

Blanks having the form illustrated in Figure 1 are then folded in such a manner as to -bring the cut ends of the blank together in together to form the bottom of the toe portion, and. the adjacent margins 12 and 13 of'the wider zones 2 are also stitched together to form the upper toe-p0rtion of the foot covering having a longitudinal center line formed by these connected margins 12 and 13. The portions 1 of the blank will then form the ankle portion of the foot covering. 7

The opposite margin of the blank, i. e., the margin having the central triangular projection, may then be brought together and stitched together along the dotted line indicated at a in Figure 1 to form the heel of the shoe or slipper. The apices of the triangular projections will preferably be separated and pressed laterally to form a pair of heel wings 15.

It will be observed in Figure 1 that the dotted line a, representing the line of heel stitches, does not extend across the base of the triangular projection to the point where it meets the relatively small triangular pro-, jection 17 on the intermediate zones 3 and 4, but on the contrary the stitch line a subdivides the associated margin of the zone 2 leaving an inner portion 18 of substantially the same length as the sides of the tri-.

, angular projection 17 Therefore, when'the heel is formed, an opening is left along the marginal portions 18 which may be closed by the triangular projection 17, the side margins of which may be stitched to the associated marginal portions 18, thus supporting the projeption 17 in an upwardly curving position as best shownin Figure 4 and forming a rounded heel for the foot covering.

It will also be, observed that the end points 8 and 9 are stitched togetherto form the foot covering shownin Figure 3 along the dotted lines bb in Figure 1 and that these as lines are substantially parallel to the selvage margins 12 and 13 although slightly offset therefrom in the direction of the tips of the end points 8 and 9 of the blank. But when forming a foot warmer as shown in Figure 6 these end points 8 and 9 are preferably left unconnected. The binding is extended to the tips of the points on the cut side, and it is, of course, optional whether these pointed portions 8 and 9 are to be folded as shown in Figure 3 or allowed to project as shown in Figure 6. If folded, the tips of the points will also be preferably stitched to the side of the upper as indicated at 22 in Figure 3.

The width of the zones 3 and 4: determines the width of the sole or bottom of the completed article regardless of whether leather insoles or outsoles are applied to stifien or protect the sole portion.. By stitching together theside margins of the central notch and the inner side margins of the flanking points formed by the zones 1 and 2, a wide, short toe ortion is formed which ismuch more com ortablc and shoe like in appearanoe than the toe portions of ordinary knitted foot coverings. Therefore any ordinary insole 2-1 may be used, or an ordinary outer sole 25 may be applied, or, if desired, both may beuemployed as shown in Figure 7. The angles formed by the ribs at the junction of these zones with the zones 2 correspond in position with the junction of the sole and the upper of an ordinary shoe, and the reverse angles at the junction of zones 2 with the ankle zones 1 correspond generally in their position with the junction of the upper and the heel portions ofan ordinary shoe with its ankle portion. Therefore, the parts naturally assume a shoe shape to which the upwardly rounded heel base and the front and rear wingsare added features of attractiveness.

In case the device is to be used as a foot warmer to be worn over a shoe, the wings 15 will be stitched together only along their upper selvage margins 23, stitching along the line a being omitted, and the projection' 17 may be cut away to enlarge the opening 20 for the heel of the shoe between the lower selvage margins of these wings. If desired, a gore may also be cut in the zones 3 and 4 along the meeting line of said zones as indicated by the dotted lines c(l in Figure 1 to narrow the arch portion of the sole. The sidesof the gore may then be sewed together as shown at 24 in Figure 6. The selvage edges of the two portions 18 converge in front of the shoe heel when the foot warmer is in position for use.

It will, of course, be desirable to bind all cut margins not stitched to other margins. Such bindings are illustrated at 21 in Figure3.

While I have stated that the zones 1 and 2 are wider than the zones 3 and 4, it will be understood that this is a matter of prefends of the blank.

erence and that the width of these zones will depend to some extent upon the height of the foot covering to be produced. The zone 1 will ordinarily be narrowed to some extent when the binding is applied, but it may be made of any desired width in the process of knitting the strip from which the blank is to be cut. Ordinarily the selvage edges will be butted and overstitched to avoid the formation of a ridge, and obtain free flexibility along the line of connection.

I claim:

1. The method of making knitted foot coverings consisting in preparing a flat fabricated blank having parallel zig-zag side margins, said margins'having a-oentral triangular projection on one side and a corresponding notch on the other side, folding that side of the blank having a centrai notch and stitching its margins and the margins of the adjacent projections together to form a toe portion, folding the adjacent end projections of the blank in opposite directions and stitching them together along their fold lines, stitching the central projection on the other side of the blank to the side margins of the adjacent projections to form a heel, and stitching the end portions together along a line crossing such end projections to form a pair of rearwardly extending heel wings. I

2. The method of making knitted foot coverings consisting in first knitting a zigzag blank in a herring bone or zig-zag rib stitch having a central V-shaped notch on one side and a corresponding triangular projection on the other side, each flanked by outwardly projecting triangular notches and proje tions, folding the ends of the blank together, stitching together the sides of the projections intermediate of the end projections, laterally folding the paired points of the end projections and stitching them together along their respective lines of fold.

The method of making knitted foot coverings consisting in first knitting a zigzag blank in a. herring bone or zig-zag rib stitch having a central V-shaped notch on one side and a corresponding triangular proj eetion on the other side, each flanked by outwardly projecting triangular notches and projections, folding the ends of the blank together, stitching together the sides of the projections intermediate of the end projections, laterally foldingthe paired points of the end projections and stitching them together along their respective lilies of fold and providing a binding for the respective 4. The method of makin a knitted foot coveringconsisting in knitting a blank having a central V-shaped notch on one side and a corresponding projection on the other side, each flanked by relatively large V-shaped projections andvnotches inithe end portions,

side of the blank together to form a heel portion.

5Q The method of making a knitted foot covering consisting in knitting a blank having a central V-shaped notch on one side and a corresponding projection on the other side each flanked by relatively large V-shaped projections and notches, folding the blank to form its central portion into a sole-of a width corresponding to that of the central- V-shaped notch, stitching the sides of the notch and the adjacent projections together form a toe portion, connecting portions of the opposite side of the blank together to form a heel portion having projecting triangular wings, and applying a binding to the end margins of the blank.

6. The method of making knitted foot coverings consisting in knitting a continuous strip of herring bone fabric in pairs of zones having ribs pitched in opposite directions,

severing the strip between the pairs of zones I 7. The method of making knitted foot coverings consisting in knitting a continuous strip of herring bone fabric in pairs of zones comprising pairs of sole forming zones having ribs' pitched in opposite directions alternating with two pairs of relatively wide zones, each having ribs similarly pitched, severing the strip between the pairs of wide zones to form blanks each having a pair of wide zones at its respective ends and a pair of narrow zones in the central portion, folding and stitching together, intermediate of its end zones, that side of the blank having a central notch, stitching together the points of the end zones at a distance from their apices, folding and securing the apex portions upon the other portions of the end zones, stitching together the end projections on the opposite sides of the blank along lines running across the end projections, and then stitching the central projection to the adj acent side margins of the end projections to form a heel. i l

8. The method of making-knitted foot coverings consisting in knitting a side portion of rib stitch herring bone pattern then knitting a solo portion of rib stitch herring bone pattern with ribs'obliquely pitched in oppgsitedirections from the'center line of the sole, then knitting a second side portion corresponding to the first side portion in form and pattern, and then folding and connecting the respective halves of the side margins with each other.

9. A knitted foot covering having a herring bone sole portion withribs running in opposite directions from a longitudlnal cen-f ter line and sewed together in the toe portion, said covering also having a herring bone upper and ankle portion, the ribs of the portion forming the upper being relatively long as compared with those in the sole portion and those of the ankle portion havingupper ends covered by a hinder, the sides of the several portions being stitched together along the longitudinal center line of the toe portion and along the upwardly extending center line of the heel.

10. A knitted foot covering having a herring bone sole portion with ribs running in opposite directions from a longitudinal center line and sewed together in the toe portion, said covering also having a herring bone upper and ankleportion, the ribs of which are relatively long as compared with those in the sole portion and arranged with those pitched in one direction constituting the upper and those pitched in the other direction constituting an ankle encasing portion.

11. A knitted foot covering having a herring bone sole portion with ribs running in opposite directions from a longitudinal center line and separating from each other along oblique lines in the heel portion, said covering also having a. herring bone upper and ankle portion, the ribs of the upper being relatively long as compared with those in the sole portion, and the ankle portion having 'at the front a set of triangular extensions folded upon and stitched to the body of the ankle portion.

12. A knitted foot covering having selvage edges stitched together from a point underneath the toe portion of the sole around the center of the toe and upwardly to the ankle encasing portion and other selvaged portions connected with each other at the heel of said covering, the threads composing said covering being unsevered except at the margins of the ankle encasing portion.

13. A knitted foot covering having selvage edges stitched together from a point underneath the toe portion of the 'sole around the center of the toe and upwardly -to the ankle encasing portion and other selvaged portions connected with each othero' at the heel of said covering, the threads composlng said covering being unsevered except at the margins of the ankle encasing portion, said selvaged margins being also provided with triangular-projections at the front of the ankle and at the rear of-the heel.

14. A knitted foot covering having selvage edges stitched together from apoint underneath the toe portion of the sole around the centerof the toe and upwardly to the ankle encasing portion and other selvaged portions connected with each other at the heel of said covering, the threads composing said covering being unsevered except at the margins of the ankle encasing portion, the sole portion including a. pair ofzoncs having stitches running obliquely with reference to each other and reinforced by an unknitted sole member.

15. A herring bone stitched knitted shoe having toe and heel portions composed of triangular members with the selvaged margins of the toe portions butted and overstitched to form a flexible ridge free seam extending from the sole forwardly to the point of the toe and upwardly and rearwardly therefrom along-the center line of the instep.

16. A knitted zig-zag rib stitched foot covering having the ribs in the sole portion running obliquely in opposite directions from a longitudinal center line and also having an integrally connected upper in- 17. A knitted foot covering having a sole portion and an integrally connected upper with selvaged margins stitched together to form a toe having a central seam and other selvaged marginal portions connected with each other to form a heel, said shoe having the ends ,of all threads included in the ankle embracing portion.

' ELMER JOHA.

Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification66/177, 36/9.00R, 36/7.2, 36/11, 66/171, 12/142.00S, 36/11.5
International ClassificationD04B1/24, D04B1/22
Cooperative ClassificationD04B1/24
European ClassificationD04B1/24