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Publication numberUS1910740 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 23, 1933
Filing dateJul 19, 1932
Priority dateJul 19, 1932
Publication numberUS 1910740 A, US 1910740A, US-A-1910740, US1910740 A, US1910740A
InventorsBarsha Henry F
Original AssigneeBarsha Henry F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dental appliance
US 1910740 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 23, 1933. H BARSHA. 1,910,740

DENTAL AP PLI ANG E Filed July 19, 1952 Inventor; Jfenr g ['Barsha,

A ttorney.

Patented May 23, 1933 PATENT OFFICE HENRY F. BARSHA, OF LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA DENTAL APPLIANCE Application filed July 19, 1932. Serial No. 623,381.

In this specification, and the accompanying drawing, I shall describe and show a preferred form of my invent1on, and specifically mention certain of its more m- 5 portant objects. I do not limit myself to the forms disclosed, since various changes and adaptations may be made therein without departing from the essence of my invention as hereinafter claimed; and objects and advantages, other than those specifically mentioned, are included within its scope.

My invention pertains to appliances for use in the practice of dentistry; and particularly to such as are adapted for art1culating purposes, and for obtammg wax bites. Among its more salient objects are; first, to provide a greatly improved form of device that is adapted for holding art1culating paper-for insertion in the mouth of a patient; second, to provide a device of 'this nature that also is particularly well suited for holding thin sheets of soft wax, for obtaining bites; third, to provide means in such a device for firmly holding other materials, such as emery cloth, in a similar manner, so that, when inserted in the mouth of a patient, he himself may accomplish certain stages of grinding the teeth for articulating purposes, by the muscles of his own jaws; fourth, to providein such a device means for firmly grippin material of various thicknesses, varying from that of a single sheet of tissue paper to that of relative coarse emery cloth; and, fifth, to accomplish the stated and similar objects by means of a very simple, reliable, and relatively inexpensive construction.

My objects are attained in the manner illustrated in the accompanying'drawing, in which- Q Figure 1 is a perspective view of my complete invention, with a specially shaped and relatively thick sheet of material held thereby, readyfor insertion in the mouth of a patient for articulation, grinding, or similar purposes, or for obtaining the bite; and

Figure 2 is a side elevation of the device by itself.

Similar reference numerals refer to similar parts throughout both Views.

As indicated generally above, one of the principal purposes of the device is to secure an accurate knowledge of the relationship and relative position of the maxillary and mandibular teeth, for locating the high 5,, spots for the purpose of milling them. It is especially important to be able to accomplish this means of checking high spots in artificial dentures, whether complete plates, inlays, 0r bridges. It also is highly desirable to be able to check the entire month of a patient with one application of the recording material, in this manner. Heretofore this has been very difficult to accomplish, and has required great skill to prevent the recording material from becoming rufi'ied, twisted, or otherwise distorted, in applying it to, and removing it from, the mouth of a patient.

In order to secure the best results, it often is desirable for such purposes touse ma terial of different thicknesses, or in superposed plural layers, in a number of steps, completing the process by using a very thin sheet of material for obtaining the finished results.

In addition to the preparation of artificial dentures, similar methods may be employed for correcting the bite of pyorrhea patients.

In other cases of dental practice, it is necessary to obtain an accurate bite of a patient in wax, in centric occlusion. In such cases a sheet of wax commonly is used, and it is highly desirable to provide means 5 for holding the wax without distortion, in such a manner that the patient, in biting, can bite clear through the wax. It is particularly desirable for such purposes to have suitable holding means, especially when the wax sheets are to be rendered soft by heatmg.

It will appear from what has been said, and indeed it is a matter of common knowledge, that any appliance that is to be used for such purposes as those mentioned, must be both light and strong, and approximate the shape and dimensions of the natural dental arch of the patient in whose mouth it is to be used. It is also well understood that, in these operations, satisfactory results cannot be obtained without providing ample space for the patients tongue, since otherwise the resulting record will be more or less unnatural and distorted.

In view of the foregoing, I prefer to construct that portion of my appliance that is to be inserted in the mouth, in an arcuate form, roughly approximating the shape and dimensions of the natural dental arch of the patient, but somewhat larger than it. The device must be capable of firmly gripping material of various thicknesses,and be provided with a manipulating handle extending from the central part of the are.

A preferred form of my invention, selected for illustration, is made wholly of wire, of German silver or other suitable material, and of the proper gauge for securing the necessary mechanical strength. It comprises a lower forked member, having a handle 5 and a pair of tines 6. At the extremity of each 'of these tines, is an upstanding ear 7, adapted to form the leaf of a hinged joint; and a similarly shaped upper forked member, having a similarly dimension'ed pair of tines 8, and a backwardly extending arm 9. The extremities of the tines of the upper forked member are pivotally "connected to cars 7 at 10. An encircling ring 11 is adapted for being slipped over arm 9, so as to hold it in contact with handle 5.

I prefer to construct the upper and lower members of my device in such a manner that the opposed tines are slightly convex with respect to each other, so that, when closing pressure is applied by means of ring 11, the opposed pairs of tines will be firmly in contact and capable of exerting strong pressure against each other for gripping purposes. I also prefer to form arm 9 in such a manner that it is adapted to act in the manner of a wedge, so that the grip of the tines may be progressively tightened as the ring 11 is pushed up.

When the device described is closed, it will appear inside elevation as indicated in Fig. 2. The opposed tines, that in open position are convex with respect to each other, will become flattened out in contact by the action of ring 11, as indicated at 12. The wedge construction of arm 9, to permit this to be done, is clearly indicated in Fig. 2.

In the use of my device, I prefer to cut such material as articulating paper, emery cloth, or wax sheets, into horseshoe form, as indicated at 13. The resiliency of the material of the tines, and of arm 9, makes it possible to obtain a strong grip upon the interposed material, throughout practically the Whole extent of its periphery; and this grip ping action is exerted upon the material without in any way distorting it. The

horseshoe shape of the material provides v claim ample space for the tongue, so that natural records may be made by the patient.

It is preferable to construct ears 7 as integral parts of the lower member of the device, and to have the upper tines pivoted thereto. In this manner the tines, in closing, have to come together in proper relation, and there will be no tendency for the gripped material to be buckled or shifted during the clamping.

Having thus fully described my device, in a manner that Will be readily understood by those familiar with the art involved, I

1. A device of the character described, comprising; a pair of superposed forks h'av ing arcuate tines pivoted together at their respective extremities, the opposed tines being slightly convex with respect to each other; and means for compressing the opposed tines against each other in such manner that their contacting surfaces will be flattened out. p

2. A device ofthe character described,

comprising; a pair of superposed forks 'having arcuate tines pivoted together at their respective extremities, the opposed tines being slightly conex with respect to each other; means for compressing the opposed tines against each other in such manner that their contacting surfaces will be flattened out in one plane, each of said forks having portions extending laterally from their centers; and a ring surrounding said portions, and adapted to hold them together.

8. A device of the character describ'ed,- comprising; a pair of superposed forks having arcuate tines pivoted together at their respective extremities, the opposed tines being slightly convex with respect to each other; means for compressing the opposed tines against each other in such manner that their contacting surfaces will be flattened out in one plane, each of said forks having portions extending laterally from their centers; and a ring surrounding said portions, and adapted to hold them together; one of said portions being disposed in a plane at a slight angle to that of the other, to adapt it to act as a wedge where engaged by said ring. H

4. A device of the character described,

comprising; a pair of superposed forks with arcuate tines swlngably connected at their respective extremities and having sfuper- .posed portions extending rearwar ly from the centers of the tines; and a ring surrounding said rearwardly extending portions whereby the opposed tines may be compressed together.

5. The construction set forth inclaim 4 wherein the tines are of resilient material and slightly convex with respect to each other, so that they may be compressed to contact in a single plane.

ass

6. The construction set forth in claim 4 wherein the tines are of resilient material and their opposed portions are slightly convex with respect to each other so that they may be compressed to contact in a single plane; the rearwardly extending portions being in diverging planes, whereby they are adapted to cooperate with an encircling ring in the manner of a Wedge, for forcing the opposed tines together.

HENRY F. BARSHA.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3118230 *May 25, 1962Jan 21, 1964 Dental articulating devices
US4185384 *Sep 12, 1977Jan 29, 1980Leopold P. LustigDental adjustment devices
US5026278 *Feb 23, 1990Jun 25, 1991Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyDental impression tray with flange
US5028232 *May 3, 1989Jul 2, 1991Snow Michael DApparatus and method for calibrating physiologic dental occlusion and determining optimal individual orthodontic appliance prescription
US5181849 *Jan 10, 1992Jan 26, 1993Callne Lars EArticulating paper holder
US5211559 *Jun 2, 1992May 18, 1993Gillette Canada Inc.Dental treatment tray for holding medicament gel
US6723103 *Sep 6, 2002Apr 20, 2004Elizabeth Ann EdwardsRongeur and rongeur cleaning method
EP0001253A1 *Sep 12, 1978Apr 4, 1979Leopold Paul Dr. LustigTooth marking device
Classifications
U.S. Classification433/38, 433/71, 433/42, 433/70, 433/159
International ClassificationA61C9/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61C9/00
European ClassificationA61C9/00