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Publication numberUS1910789 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 23, 1933
Filing dateFeb 21, 1931
Priority dateFeb 21, 1931
Publication numberUS 1910789 A, US 1910789A, US-A-1910789, US1910789 A, US1910789A
InventorsBrady Charles V
Original AssigneeBemis Bro Bag Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container handle
US 1910789 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 23, 1933. C v BRADY 1,910,789

CONTAINER HANDLE Filed Feb. 2l, 1951 Patented May 23, 1933 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CHARLES V. BRADY, OF ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI, ASSIGNOR TO .'BEMIS BRO. BAG COMPANY,

OF ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI, A CORPORATION 0F MISSOURI CONTAINER HANDLE Application led February 21, 1931. Serial No. 517,400.

This invention relates to handles, and with regard to certain more specific features, to handles formed from strip fabric used on and to seam containers made from fabric and the like.

Among the several objects of the invention may be noted the provision of strong, flexible means on containers for providing a manual purchase, which means shall not be subject to tearing or excessive deterioration duringl ordinary handling; and the provision of means of the class described which shall be easily and economically manufactured and applied. Other objects will be in part obvious and i-n part pointed out hereinafter.

The'invention accordingly comprises the elements and combinations of elelnents, features of construction, and arrangements of parts which will beexempliiied in the structure hereinafter described,vand the scope of the application of which will be indicated in the following claims.

In the accompanying drawing, in which is illustrated several of various possible em` bodiments of the invention,

Fig. 1 is a perspective View of a partially i folded bag or container showing the application of the invention thereto, with one part `shown open for purposes of description; and,

Fig. 2 is a plan view similar tothe bag shown in Fig. 1, showing the bag closed and filled with material. j

Similar reference characters indicate corresponding parts throughout the several views of the drawing.

In the ordinary handling of lilled containers such as the bag shown in Figs. 1 and 2, the workmen or handler experiences diiculty in obtaining a hold on the bag suflicient to lift the same without the use of hooks or the like. The use of hooks tears the fabric, thereby allowing bagged materia-l to leak* out. Furthermore, their use may render the bag unlit for further service. To-overcome this difficulty, I provide strips or handles extending from the bag as shown in Figs. 1 and 2, which broadly, are formed by extending a fastening strip comprising a seam beyond the edge of a container.

Referring now more particularly to Fig. 1

there is shown at numeral 1 a container or bag formed from fabric 2 or the like, the longitudinal edges of the fabric 2 being juxtaposed and preferably joined in a lapped seam as shown at numeral 3. One end of the container or bag 1, the mouth, is left open as shown at numeral 5 to receive material to be bagged, and the other end 7 is closed by a strip 9. l

The lapped joint or seam 3 may be formed as described in my United States Patent No. 1,853,013, granted April 5, 1932, to provide a joint with an eliciency which may be greater than 100%; that is, the strength of the joint may be greater than the strength of the inaterial which forms it. As further described in the above-mentioned patent application, the joint 3 may be formed, if the outer material 2 is unlined, by overlapping the edges and applying a layer o f cement or adhesive material 11, comprising preferably process having the proper qualities.

The seam 3 is described only fork sake" rubber, gum, latex, asphalt or any adhesive v prior to the application to the bag, a layer I of the adhesve material 11.

After application of the cement 11, to the strip 9, but before the cement dries, the strip 9 is folded on itself along a longitudinal crease 8 with the cement 11 located on the inner surfaces of the strip.k As the stripl 9 is thus folded, juxtaposed edges 13 and 15 of the edge 7 of the bag 1, are included between the surfaces of the strip 9. Fig. 1 clearly shows the arrangement at the portion of the parts laid open." It is preferable that after, or at the time of applying the folded strip 9 to the juxtaposed edges 13 and 15 that the strip 9 be compressed and creased, either by rollers or otherwise, so that the cement 11 is forced into the fibres of the fabric 2 and so that the seam is made thin.

Ends 17 of the strips 9 are allowed to extend substantially beyond the edges of the bag 1 and as shown in Fig. 1, these ends 17 may also be folded along the crease 8 with cement 11 spread between the juxtaposed surfaces. These extended` ends 17 are then dou-d bled back or looped as at 18 to form the hanprises the outer layer of the fabric 2, or, the

strips 9 may be selected of a stronger material than the fabric 2, thereby providing stronger handles 17.

In use the workman may insert his hand into theloops or handles 18 and thereby obtain a secure hold. The loop handles 18 may also be grasped as a whole, and if such is the J case, an unusually strong and easily gripped lifting handle is provided.

As shown in Fig. 2 a strip 23, similar to the strip 9, is used to sealA the mouth 5, of the bag 1, after the container 1 is filled. Other" known methods, however, may be used to seal the mouth 5, sewing them together.

It is to be noted that the number ofhandles formed on the bag may be varied. Thus only one end of the strip 9 may be extended and looped back in the manner described. Or, the ends of the strip 28 (if such a strip is used to seal the mouth) may be extended, whereby, as many as four handles may be formed from the two strips 9 and 23.

An advantage of the invention is that the same strip or means, which is provided to seal the end or to provide a. seam for the I claim:

1. A bag having at least one opening, means for closing saidv opening comprising a strip folded over said opening when the opening is closed, adhesive sealing means between the bag and closing means, and at leastone extension from said bag formed by at least one continuous portion offsaid closing means and means for positively holding said closing means to the bag near the point from which it forms an extension, said extension of the closing means being looped back upon itself, the end thereof also being held by said positive holding means.

2. A bag having at least one opening, means for closing said opening comprising a strip folded over said opening when the opening is closed, adhesive sealing means between the bag and closing means, and at least one extension from said bag formed by at least one continuous portion V`of said closing means and means'for positively holding said closing means to the bag near the point from which it forms an extension, said extension of the closing means being looped back upon itself, the end thereof also being held by said positive holding means, said positive holding means comprising at least one member passing through the juxtaposed thickness of closure means and bagnear said point of extension.

3. A bag having at least one edge, means covering said edge comprising a strip folded over the edge, means for attaching said strip to said edge, and at least one extension from the bag formed by at least one continuous portion of said strip, said extending portion being looped back upon itself, and means joining the end of the loop portion with the strip itself.

In testimonywhereof, I have signed my' name to thisv specification this 19th day of February 1931.

CHARLES V. BRADY.

end of a container or bag, is' also utilized to provide a strong lifting handle, whereby a workman can easily obtain a good purchase on the bag orcontainer. In this way, the necessity for the use of hooks or the like, on bags is overcome.

-In view of the above, it will be seen that 3 the several objects of the invention are

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2527073 *Jun 3, 1947Oct 24, 1950Int Paper CoBag closure
US2527074 *Oct 15, 1947Oct 24, 1950Int Paper CoBag closure
US2586283 *Mar 25, 1949Feb 19, 1952Delmos Wynn HermanHandle for football dummies
US2620944 *Jan 21, 1949Dec 9, 1952William F StahlPlastic container
US2625318 *May 29, 1946Jan 13, 1953Union Bag & Paper CorpBag with handles
US2808091 *Jan 11, 1955Oct 1, 1957Taylor Provision CoBag
US2866489 *Nov 16, 1955Dec 30, 1958Horger Lewis BBag with tie cord
US3137438 *Aug 29, 1961Jun 16, 1964Milton Charles JDisposable container
US3199719 *Jul 2, 1962Aug 10, 1965Inland Steel CoContainer handle construction
US4479243 *Feb 17, 1983Oct 23, 1984Super Sack Manufacturing CorporationCollapsible receptacle with prefabricated lift loops and method of making
US4822178 *Jul 24, 1984Apr 18, 1989Standard Textile Company, Inc.Bag with dual purpose hook and loop fastener strips and method of making same
US4877336 *Mar 6, 1989Oct 31, 1989Paramount Packaging CorporationBottom loaded duplex bag having a handle and method of making same
US5112138 *Jun 8, 1990May 12, 1992Paramount Packaging CorporationResealable reusable flexible plastic bag with loop handle
US5507577 *Apr 11, 1994Apr 16, 1996Fowler; Charles A.Commercial laundry collection apparatus
US6353215 *Aug 13, 1998Mar 5, 2002Eric RevelsCarrying case and a method of making thereof
US8393110 *Apr 2, 2007Mar 12, 2013Thomas BallLive sport fish protection system
US20070169400 *Apr 2, 2007Jul 26, 2007Thomas BallLive sport fish protection system
Classifications
U.S. Classification383/6, 383/24, 383/78, 383/107
International ClassificationB65D33/10, B65D33/06
Cooperative ClassificationB65D33/10
European ClassificationB65D33/10