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Publication numberUS1912174 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 30, 1933
Filing dateFeb 27, 1929
Priority dateFeb 27, 1929
Publication numberUS 1912174 A, US 1912174A, US-A-1912174, US1912174 A, US1912174A
InventorsAlvin Bisch
Original AssigneeRalph Rocco
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Device to train aviators or for amusement purposes
US 1912174 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 30, 1933. A. BISCH I DEVICE TO TRAIN AVIATORS- OR FOR AMUSEMENT PURPOSES 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Feb. 27, 1929 May 30, 1933. A, BISVCH 1,912,174

DEVICE TO TRAIN AVIATORS OR FOR AMUSEMENT PURPOSES Filed Feb. 27. 1929 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented May 30, 1933 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE ALVIN BISCH, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, ASSIGNOR OI ONE-HALF TO RALPH 30000,

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS DEVICE TO TRAIN AVIATORS OR FOR AMUSEMENT PURPOSES Application filed February 27, 1929. Serial No. 842,959.

The present invention is directed to a device which is adapted for the use of training aviators and familiarizing them with the controls of a conventional type of aeroplane, or may be used as an amusement device in which the operator of the same may manipulate the controls for guiding the aeroplane without the danger of a crash.

One of the primary objects of the present invention is to provide a device in which a captive aeroplane is permitted to move bodily with respect to a revolving frame structure so that the o erator thereof can uide, dip or dive, and asa wide range of control of the aeroplane within the range of the flexible cable connecting the plane to the revolving structure.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved aviator training device in which the operator thereof. may be taught how to manipulate the controls of the conventional type of aeroplane, namely, the ailerons, the rudder and tail control.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved aviator "training or amusement device in which the conventional type of aeroplane is complete in every respect with the exception that it is minus the propeller and motor, and is held in captivity or connected with the revolving frame structure with a flexible cable, which may be shortened or lengthened for varying the range or free movement of the aeroplane, with respect to the revolving structure. 1

These and other objects are accomplished by providing a construction and arrangement of the various parts in the manner hereinafter described and particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

Referring to the drawings, Fig. 1 is a fragmentary side elevational view of my im-"- proved aviator training or amusement device showing the manner in which the aeroplane is attached thereto.

Fig. 2 is a top plan view of the same. Fig. 3 is an enlarged, fragmentary, cross sectional view showing the main bearing for ing shaft 19. I The the vertical shaft and the power mechanism for driving the same.

Fig. 4 is an enlarged, cross sectional view of one of the arms or beams showing the manner in which the cable is suspended over a sheave in a pivoted bracket.

Fig. 5 is an enlarged top plan, detailed view of the anti-friction hearing for the main drive shaft, and

Fig. 6 is a fr entary, cross sectional view of the nose racket of the aeroplane showing the swivel connection between the cable and the aeroplane.

The primary purpose of the present invention is to provide a device for the training of aviators or a.- device which may be. used as an amusement device, in which'the controls for iding the aeroplane may be manipulated y the operator for deflecting the aeroplane up and down, and in and out of its course, which it would normally describe by reason of the centrifugal force and movement of the revolving structure, without the fear of a crash.

In carrying out my invention, I have shown the same as comprising a substantially vertical standard frame structure, generally indicated by the reference character 10, which may be suitably embedded in a base of con-. crete, so as to insure a firm foundation. This frame structure comprises four converging cornerfposts 11, which are arranged inthe form 0 a pyramid, and are preferably made of four angle irons 12 which in turn are braced together by a plurality of angularly cross bars 13. These posts are further braced together by transverse frame members 14 and cross braces 15, which are arranged at suitable spaced apart distances throughout the entire length of the posts 11. The upper ends of these posts 11 are secured together by a bearing plate 16 in any well known manner, which is provided with a downwardly extending bearing portion 17 having a bore 18 therein. Extending vertically through the bore 18 of the bearin 17 is a vertically revolv- Taottom end of the shaft is journaled in' a bearing 20 formed in the horizontal platform 21, secured in any well known manner tothe inclined posts 11. Se-

cured to the lower end of the shaft 19 adjacent the bearing 20 in any well known manner is a worm wheel 21 which in turn meshes with a worm 22 secured to a shaft 23. The shaft 23 is mounted in suitable bearings (not shown) which in turn are secured to the platform 21. Secured to the shaft 23 is a spur gear 24 which in turn meshes with and is operatively driven by a second spur gear 25. This spur gear 25 is secured to a shaft 26 of an electric motor 27. The motor 27 is mounted on the platform 21 of the device. Revolvably mounted on top of the standard 10 is a revolving head or frame structure generally indicated by the reference character 28 which comprises two spaced apart hub plates 29 and 30. Secured to these hub plates by means of rivets 31 are four arms generally indicated by the reference character 32. Each of these arms 32 comprises four angle iron members 33 which are secured to the hub plates 29 and 30, and are held relatively spaced apart by these hub members, but converge toward their outer ends as clearly shown in Fig. 2, and have their outer ends secured to bearing brackets 34. The bearing brackets 34 are secured by means of rivets 35 to the outer ends of these arms. These angle irons 33 are suitably braced together by a plurality of cross braces 36 which extend substantially throughout the entire length of these arms and reinforce and strengthen the arm structures of this revolving head. Each of the hub plates 29 and 30 are provided with hubs or sleeve portions as shown at 37 and 38 respectively, which have vertical bores therein for receiving the shaft 19, and are secured thereto by means of bolts or pins 39 and 40. Mounted between the lower hub plate 30 and the bearing plate 16 is a roller bearing generally indicated by the reference character 41 which comprises a retaining ring 42 and .anti-fric tion bearing rollers 43 of any well known construction. The outer ends of these arms 32 and the revolving head 28 are further reinforced and strengthened by thrust cables 44 and 45 which have their outer ends secured in an L shaped bracket 46, which in turn is secured to the outer ends of each of the arms 32 by means of the rivets 35. Extending vertically upward at apoint substantially in the center of each of these arms, are substantially upwardly converging thrust braces 47 secured to the upper end of the arms in any well known manner. The thrust cables 44 and 45 are connected in any well known manner as shown at 48 to the upper ends of these thrust braces 47. The cable 44 extends through a sleeve 49 mounted in an aperture 50 located in the upper end of the shaft 19, while the thrust cable 45 extends through a second sleeve 51 extending through an aperture 52 arranged below and transversely with respect to the first aperture 50 in the upper end of the shaft 19. Mounted in the bearing brackets 34 of each of the arms 32 is a swiveled sheave bracket 53 which is journaled in the bore 54 formed in the bracket 34. The swiveled or sheave bracket 53 is provided with a shoulder 55 which is adapted to engage the outer end of the bracket 34. The swivel bracket 53 is prevented from displacement from the bracket 34 by means of a nut 56 which is mounted in threaded engagement with the threaded portion 57 of the inner end of the sheave bracket 53. Positioned between the nut 56 of the inner shoulder of the sheave bracket 53 is a Washer 58. J ournaled within the swivel or sheave bracket 53 on a pin or shaft 59 is a sheave or pulley 60 over which is trained a flexible cable 61 forming the connection between the aeroplane and Windlass hereinafter described. The sheave bracket is provided with a longitudinally extending bore 62 through which the cable 61 extends. The sheave bracket is provided with a funnel like shield portion 63 which is arranged at substantially right angles to the bearing portion 54 for forming a uide for the cable 61 and preventing the ca le from displacement from the sheave 60.

In order to reinforce and further strengthen the revolving head or structure 28 on the standard or frame 10 I have provided inwardly converging brace members 64 which are secured in any well known manner as shown at 65 to the under side of each of the arms 32 at a position directly below the thrust members 47 The inner ends of these angularly disposed brace members 64 are provided with bifurcated portions as shown at 66 which have journaled therein on pins 67 grooved rollers 68 which are adapted to engage and ride on a curved track 69, which in turn is secured to the platform 21 in any well known manner. These inclined brace members 64 are further braced by thrust posts 70 which are secured to each of the inner ends of the arms in any well known manner as shown at-71. The lower ends of these thrust posts are secured to the inner ends of the arms 64 as shown at 72. Mounted on each of these thrust posts 70 as shown at 73 is a Windlass which is capable of being operated by a crank 74. The cable 61 is connected to the windlass 73 so that the cable may be wound thereon in shortening the range of movement of the aeroplane with respect to the outer or free ends of the arms so that the range of freedom of the aeroplane with respect to the arm may be varied. The cable 61 is trained on a sheave 75 which in turn is journaled on a pin 76 secured to each of the arms 32.

Each of these arms 32 are further reinforced and braced with respect to each other by thrust cables or rods 77 and 78.

The aeroplanes used in connection with my.

improved aviator training or amusement device are of the conventional form of aeroplane except that they are minus the usual propeller and motor, ut are provided with the usual fuselage 79, wings 80, ailerons 81, rudder 82 and tail 83. These movable direction controlling parts of the aeroplane are under the control of the operator in the seat of the aeroplane and operate in every respect and detail as a conventional type of aeroplane. In order to insure a proper landing 19 of the aeroplane on the ground when the revolving head ceases to turn, I have tended a sgecial form of landing gear, whic is prefera ly located on the rear end as shown at 84 of the aeroplane, and may comprise the usual rubber tired wheels or iron skids.

The front end of each aeroplane is provided with a metal 110% bracket 86 which has a long extending bore 87 therein, which in turn receives a'swivel eye bolt 88. The inner 90 end of the eye bolt is provided with an antifriction ball bearing generally indicated by the reference character 89, and is held secured therein by a nut 90 mounted in threaded engagement with the threaded rtion 91 of the 8 eye bolt 88. The front on of the nose is similarly provided with an anti-friction bearing 92 which is mounted in a suitable recess 93 in the front end of the nose bracket 86. The eye bolt 88 is provided with the usual eye 94 in which the free end of the cable 61 is attached in any well known manner.

In order to provide a position for the operator of the device for viewing the operation of the four planes and in manipulating the windlames of each of the aeroplanes, I have provided a circular platform 95 which. extends around and is secured to the inner anle members 64 in any well known manner. urrounding this platform is a suitable hand rail 96.

The operation of my improved aviator training and amusement device is as follows: When each of the aeroplanes attached to each of the arms 32 are provided with a passenger, the electric motor 27 may be thrown into operation by operating the switch, and throu h the driving mechanism previously descri d, the shaft 19 is revolved in a clockwise direction, as when viewing Fig. 2, and when suflicient speed has been attained by the revolving head, each of the aeroplanes will leave the ground, at which time the controls of each of theplanes may be manipulated by the passenger in the aeroplane so that the plane may dive or rise, or be diverted from its natural course in following the outer end of the free arm of the revolving structure. This permits the operator thereof to learn the effects of manipulating the control of the aeroplane in such a manner that he will become familiarized with the operation of the controls and within a short time will be capable of manipulating the controls of a regular aeroplane.

It will also be noted that by having the front end or nose of the aeroplane connected to the revolving arm, that the possibihty of a crash is entirely eliminated and especially so when the lengt of the cable which flexibly connects the aero lane to the structure may be drawn inward toward the arm for reducing the ran 0 freedom of the aeroplane. This is done 0 course through the operatlon of the windlass 73 by the operator on the platform 95 of the device.

In landing the cable which connects the aeroplane to the arm of the revolving structure is of sufiicient length to maintain the fuse age of the plane at substantially a horizontal position when the rear skids engage the ground, so that a perfect landing is assured when the revolving head comes to a sto I I the above specification, I have pointed out wherein my improved device may be used as a training device for aviators and as an amusement device, but it will also of course be understood, that a miniature structure of this same device may be built so as to employ the same principles described and claimed herein as a toy.

While in the above specification I have described one embodiment of my invention, it will of course be understood that the same is capable of modification, and that modification may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as expressed in the following claims. I

What I claim as my invention and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A device of the class described comprising a rotary frame, said frame being supported a considerable distance above the ground, a cable suspended from said frame, an aeroplane connected at one end only to the free end of said cable, and means mounted on said rotary frame for adjusting the length of the cable between said frame and said aeroplane.

2. A device of the class described comprising a rotary frame, said frame being supported a considerable distance above the ground, a cable suspended from said frame, an aeroplane connected at one end only to the free end of said cable, and a windlass mounted on said rotary frame and connected to the other end of said cable whereby the length of the cable between said frame and said aeroplane may be increased or diminished.

3. A device of the class described comprising a rotary frame having a plurality of outwardly extending arms at a considerable distance above the ground, a single cable suspended from each of said arms, an areoplane connected to the free end of each cable whereby passengers in the aeroplanes may operate the controls of the aeroplanes for deflecting them out of their normal course, and windlasses mounted on said rotary frame and having the inner ends of said cables connected thereto, for winding the cables thereon, for

increasing or decreasing the range of movement of said aeroplanes with respect to said arms.

4. A device of the class described comprising a rotary frame, arms projecting radially from said frame at a position a considerable distance above the ground, a laterally pivoted sheave swiveled to the outer ends of each arm, a single cable trained over said sheave and suspended therefrom, an aeroplane connected at its forward end to the outer end of said cable, and a Windlass mounted on said frame and connected to the inner end of said cable whereby the aeroplane may be adjusted to or from said arm.

5. A device of the class described comprising a rotary frame, said frame being supported a considerable distance above the ground, a cable suspended from said frame, an aeroplane connected to the free end of said cable and a swivel connection mounted in said aefiplane and forming a connection with said ca e.

6. A device of the class described comprising a rotary frame structure having an outwardly projecting arm, the outer end of said arm being supported a considerable distance above the ground, an adjustable cable mounted in said arm having one end suspended therefrom, a sheave swiveled on the outer end of said arm over which the cable is trained, an aeroplane having its forward end connected to the free end of said cable, and a swivel eye bolt mounted in the forward end of said acre plane and forming the connection between said aeroplane and said cable.

7 A device of the class described comprising a rotary frame, said frame being supported a considerable distance above the ground, a cable suspended from the outer portion of said frame, an aeroplane connected at one end only to the free end of said cable and controls carried by said aeroplane for deflecting said aeroplane with relation to said frame.

8. A device of the class described comprising a substantially vertical standard, a rotary structure mounted thereon, an aeroplane, a single cable for connecting said aeroplane to said rotary structure, and controls carried by said aeroplane for maneuvering said aeroplane bodily in every direction with respect to said structure and out of the normal path set up by the centrifugal force of the revolving aeroplane within a certain predetermined range.

9. A device of the class described comprising a substantially vertical standard, a rotary structure mounted thereon, an aeroplane, a single flexible means connecting said aeroplane with said rotary structure, and controls carried by said aeroplane whereby said controls may be manipulated to move the aeroplane bodily with respect to said rotary structure in every direction. and out of the normal path set up by the centrifugal force of the revolving aeroplane within the range of said flexible means.

10. A device of the class described comprising a substantially vertical standard, a rotary structure mounted thereon, an aeroplane movable means connecting one end only of said aeroplane with said rotary structure, and controls carried by said aeroplane for maneuvering said aeroplane during the rotation of said rotary structure.

11. A device of the class described compris ing a substantially vertical standard, a rotary structure mounted thereon, an aeroplane, a flexible cable connecting the front end of said aeroplane with said rotary structure, and

controls carried by said aeroplane for actuating said aeroplane in all directions with respect to said rotary structure within the range of said flexible cable.

In testimony whereofI have signed my name to this specification, on this 21st day of February A. D. 1929.

ALVIN BISCH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3991487 *Feb 3, 1976Nov 16, 1976Bede James RFlight training assembly
US4790755 *Jun 26, 1986Dec 13, 1988Rene LeducAircraft pilot-training apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification434/55, 472/27, 472/33
International ClassificationG09B9/12, G09B9/02
Cooperative ClassificationG09B9/12
European ClassificationG09B9/12