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Publication numberUS1912454 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 6, 1933
Filing dateMar 3, 1932
Priority dateMar 3, 1932
Publication numberUS 1912454 A, US 1912454A, US-A-1912454, US1912454 A, US1912454A
InventorsHutter William H
Original AssigneeHutter William H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Acoustic apparatus
US 1912454 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 6, 1933. w. H. HUTTER ACOUSTIC APPARATUS Filed March 1932 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 J J) 1921/67: Z07.-

Zdllz'am M,

June 6, 1933. w. H. HUTTER ACOUSTIC APPARATUS 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March 3, 1952 Patented June 6, 1933 UNITED STATES WILLIAM H. HUTTER, OF FORT WAYNE, INDIANA ACOUSTIC APPARATUS Application filed March 3,

This invention relates to acoustic apparatus and includes among its objects the provision of novel and improved acoustic apparatus suitable for use in conjunction with 5 a radio set or with any other suitable source for delivering energy to be converted into sound, whereby the acoustic or sound emitting apparatus may be attached to or form members of the radio cabinet or may be constructed as one or more units positionable in desired locations and operable by and controlled from the remotely located radio set; whereby the sound is diffused or distributed instead of being projected in one or more definite directions; whereby the quality and fuilness of tone of the sound are improved by novel. means; and whereby, in general, to provide such novel acoustic apparatus which is adapted to resonate over substantially the entire audible frequency range and to respond with fidelity to the sound vibrations from such converters as loud speakers.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following drawings, in which similar characters of reference indicate similar parts throughout the several views.

In the drawings:

Figs. 1 and 2 are perspective views of complementary acoustic units embodying some of the features of my invention;

Figs. 3 and 7 are perspective views of complementary acoustic units embodying other features of the invention;

Fig. at is a perspective view of novel complementary acoustic units similar to those shown in Figs. 1 and 2, illustrating a use thereof;

* F ig. 5 is a perspective view of a multiple acmistic unit of the type adapted to be remotely positioned in respect of the source for supplying the sound convertible energy; and

Fig. 6 is an elevation of a unit similar to that shown in Fig. 5, but employing a single I sound converter or loud speaker to resonate the unit.

In order to accomplish the foregoing objects, I employ acoustic apparatus includdescription, and from the accompanying 1932. Serial No. 596,471.

.nected to, for example, a radio, a phonograph, or a combined radio and phonograph, such as shown at 14 in Fig. 1. lVhere more than one loud speaker 12 is employed in the acoustic apparatus, they may be so arranged and connected that they have the proper phase relation.

The particular size and shape of, and means for obtaining the desired resonance characteristics in the columns 11, and the location of the columns are unimportant, it being only important that the resonance 70 characteristics of each column approximate those of the associated speaker. For example, as shown in Figs. 1 and 2, the columns may take a generally rectangular shape adapted to serve as front and back, top and 75 bottom, or other opposite sides or walls of the radio cabinet 14, see Fig. 4. On the other hand, as shown in Figs. 3 and 5 to 7, the columns may be separate from and even remotely positionable in respect of the source of energy for conversion into sound and may be substantially tubular in shape. These columns also illustrate in Figs. 3 and 7 the complementary units which may be positioned at desired locations, and the multiple units with one (see Fig. 6) or more (see Fig. loud speakers 12 for providing a large baflie area for the sound and for diffusing the sound to attain a space effect as distinguished from the discordant blasts so noticeable and undesirable in known acoustic apparatus.

Illustrative of the means for obtaining the desired acoustic characteristics, the columns 11, as shown in Figs. 5 and 6, may be of different lengths and different sizes, and a loud speaker, associated with each column, is adapted to resonate its associated column (see Fig. 5), or a single loud speaker adapted to set up substantially all of the vibrations for the fundamental tones and overtones of substantially all qualities is associated with a plurality of such columns of differentsizes and lengths. (See Fig. 6.)

As shown, however, in Figs. 1, 2 and l, I may select a loud speaker res )onsive to relatively high frequencies and a speaker of relatively low frequencies and mountthe former near an end of a side wall 15, and the latter near an end of a side wall 16 of a column ll, by means of a clampi 1''; ring 17 and screws 18. The side wall 15 carrying the high frequency speaker is provided with a plurality of a, ertures 15 about the periphery of the speaker in order to eliminate sounds of low frequency and to establish an equilibrium of air pressure at opposite sides of the speaker.

Now to this side wall 17 carrying the high frequency loud speak-er. I attach a channel 21 of a suitable sounding board material. such as straight n'rain spruce, provided with. a sound insulating" gasket- 22 of rubber or felt. This channel has a hard and well polished finish and of course is susceptible to various modifications in shape and construction, such as cross-bracing, sectionalization. and aperturino; in order to provide the column with resonance characteristics approximating: those of the associated loud speaker and in order to improve the quality of sound emanating therefrom.

A channel 23 of heavier mater al is suitably attached to the side wall 16 carrying the low frequency loud speaker to provide a column adapted to be resonated by such a sneaker. This column is lined with a suitable sound damping material 2%, such as felt o acoustic celotex. and may be provided with. drapes 25 arranged to hang from near the top of the column inwardly thereoi to absorb sounds of high frequency.

The columns shown in Figs. 3 and 7 may be constructed to resonate at high and lower frequencies. respectively. as described above.

i ls already mentioned. he instant invention contemplates an improved wal for radio cabinets. As shown. in Fig. 4. a high frequency column such as the one shown in Fig. I may form one side of the radio cabinet 14. and a low frequency column such as that shown in Fig. 2 may form the opposite side of the cabinet 1%,. hen so arranged. I overcome cabinet reverberation and the effects of cabinet resonance by cross-bracing between the side walls 15 and 16. As illustrated, the control panel 26 as well as the supports for the radio units may serve this function.

The aco c columns may be provided with a cover 2? naving' a plurality of sound escape apertures or louvers 28 behind which I arrange tine silk to produce a finished appearance. lVhere desired, the columns may also be provided with openings or slits 29 of de sired shapes and designs to relieve the air at the mouth of the speaker.

Thus it will be seen that I have provided acoustic apparatus suitable for use in conjunction with a source from which energy may be supplied for conversion into sound and sound conversion apparatus for convert-- ing such energy into sound, the conversion apparatus being associated with resonating columns providing a large baflle area to cause diffusion and distribution of the sound from the conversion apparatus and adapted to provide side walls of a radio cabinet or to be remotely positioned in respect thereof.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States, is:

1. In acoustic apparatus, a plurality of sound cmiverters adapted to resonate at ditlcrcnt frequencies and a sound column for ea h said converte' adapted to be resonated by the associated converter to the exclusion of the other converters.

In acoustic apparatus for sound producing: means. a sound converter responsive to relatively high frequencies. a sound converter responsive to lower frequencies, and. means associated with the first said converter to eliminate sounds of such lower frequency.

2-3. In acoustic apparatus for sound producing means, a sound converter responsive to relatively high frequencies, a sound converter res 'ionsive to lower frequencies. and means associated with the second mentioned sound converter to absorb sounds at relatively high frequencies.

4:. In acoustic apparatus for sound producing: means, a sound converter responsive to relatively high frequencies. a sound converter responsive to lower flfBQHGllOlQS, and means associated with each said sound converter for eliminating the frequencies at which the other said sound converter resonates.

The combinatioi'x of energy emittilu up paratus adapted to emit energy for conversion fato sound with sound converting means adapted to convert the energy emitted by said apparatus into sound. and sound ditl'using means associated with said sound cmivertinp, means and remotely posit oned in respect to said energy emitting apiimratus.

6. The combination of sound producing means including a source of energy with a phirality of acoustic columns remotely positioned with respect to said, source of one: y and adapted to ditl'usc the sound from said sound producing means.

7. An acoustic apparatus "tor radio sets comprising a relatively high frequency loud speaker, a low frequency loud speaker, and an acoustic column carrying each said loud speaker and adapted to resonate therewith.

S. The combination of a radio receiving set with an acoustic column at opposite sides thereof adapted to resonate at different audible frequencies.

9. The combination of a radio receiving set with a relatively high frequency acoustic column forming a side of said radio receiving set, and a low frequency acoustic column forming the opposite side of said radio receiving set.

10. The combination of a radio receiving set with a relatively high frequency acoustic column forming a side of said radio receiving set, a low frequency acoustic column forming the opposite side of said radio receiving set, and means extending between said acoustic columns preventing cabinet re verberation.

11. In acoustic apparatus for radio receiying sets, a plurality of tubular columns adapted to resonate a different frequencies and a loud speaker associated with each said tubular column and adaptedto resonate it.

12. In a radio receiving set, a tubular acoustic column and an associated loud speaker remotely positioned in respect of said radio receiving set and adapted to convert energy from said set into sounds of high pitch, and another tubular column and associa-ted loud speaker adapted to convert energy from said set into sounds of lower pitch than that of the first said column and associated speaker.

13. An acoustic apparatus adapted to be used as a side of a radio cabinet, comprising a side wall, a loud speaker carried therein near an end thereof, and a channel member of a material resonating at the frequencies of sounds from said loud speaker and secured to said side wall.

1 1. A side wall of a radio cabinet and a loud speaker carried in said side wall, in combination with a channel member secured to said side wall and constructed of sounding board material.

15. A side wall of a radio cabinet and a loud speaker carried therein, in combination with a channel secured to said side wall and. a sound damping lining in said channel.

16. A side wall of a radio cabinet and a loud speaker carried therein, in combination with a channel secured to said side wall, a sound damping lining in said channel, and sound absorbing means carried between said channel and said side wall.

In witness whereof, I hereunto subscribe my name this 26th day of February, 1932.

WILLIAM H. I-IUTTER.

DISCLAIMER 1,912,454.-William H. Hatter, FortWayne, Ind. Acous'rrc APPARATUS. Patent dated June 6, 1933. Disclaimer filed September 13, 1935, by the patentee.

Hereby enters this disclaimer to that part of the specification which is in the following words, to wit:

Claim 2means associated with said converter to eliminate sounds of such lower frequency, except where said means to eliminate said sounds of such lower frequency directly affects the sound per se, as distinguished from energy convertible into sound.

Claim 3means associated with the second mentioned sound converter to absorb sounds at relatively high frequencies, except where said means to absorb sounds at relatively high frequencies affects the sound per se, as distinguished from energgi convertlble mto sound.

aim 4'-meansassociated with each said sound converter for eliminatin the frequencies at "which the other said sound converter resonates except where sai means is for eliminating sound frequencies as distinguished from energy frequencies convertible into sound.

Qflici Gazette October 8, 1935.]

DISCLAIMER 1,912,454.W'illiam H. Hatter, Fort-Wayne, Ind. Aoous'rrc APPARATUS. Patent dated June 6, 1933. Disclaimer filed September 13, 1935, by the patentee.

Hereby enters this disclaimer to that part of the specification which is in the following words, to wit:

Claim 2means associated with said converter to eliminate sounds of such lower frequency, except where said means to eliminate said sounds of such lower frequency directly affects the sound per so, as distinguished from energy convertible into sound.

Claim 3means associated with the second mentioned sound converter to absorb sounds at relatively high frequencies,. except where said means to absorb sounds at relatively high frequencies affects the sound per se, as distinguished from energy convertible into sound.

Claim 4means associated with each said sound converter for eliminating the frequenciesat-Which the other said sound converter resonates except Where sai means is for ehmmating sound frequencies as distinguished from energy frequencies convertible into sound.

[Oficial Gazette October 8, 1985.]

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2619866 *Jun 30, 1950Dec 2, 1952Kenneth J BaileyAcoustical appliance
US2627931 *Dec 3, 1949Feb 10, 1953Stromberg Carlson CoMeans for improving frequency response of sound systems
US2670053 *Feb 7, 1950Feb 23, 1954Benedict DomsCabinet for loudspeakers and the like
US2694462 *Sep 19, 1951Nov 16, 1954Frank RobbinsAcoustic system for loud-speakers
US2718272 *Dec 29, 1950Sep 20, 1955Rca CorpDynamic microphone
US2768702 *Feb 7, 1952Oct 30, 1956Larmer Lowry Charles ArielSound reproducing systems
US2810448 *Dec 27, 1954Oct 22, 1957Dijck Willem J D VanLoud-speaker enclosure
US3329236 *Jun 3, 1966Jul 4, 1967Arden DavidSpeaker neclosure
US4869340 *Jun 17, 1988Sep 26, 1989Coudoux Christian AVery high performance loudspeaker enclosures
DE1020678B *Sep 9, 1954Dec 12, 1957Georg HeymannGeraet fuer natuerliche, plastische Wiedergabe von Sprache und Musik
EP0101031A2 *Aug 5, 1983Feb 22, 1984Alkoto Ifjuság EgyesülésArrangement for sound sources avoiding acoustic short circuits in loudspeakers
WO1998002014A1 *Jul 7, 1997Jan 15, 1998Bonfils AlanMethod and apparatus for reproducing sound by natural filtering of sound waves
WO2002009472A1 *Jul 24, 2001Jan 31, 2002Coudert LaurentIntegral diaphragm with amplified mechanical resonance
Classifications
U.S. Classification181/146
International ClassificationH04R1/28
Cooperative ClassificationH04R1/2842, H04R1/2857
European ClassificationH04R1/28N11L