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Publication numberUS1912724 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 6, 1933
Filing dateNov 30, 1931
Priority dateNov 30, 1931
Publication numberUS 1912724 A, US 1912724A, US-A-1912724, US1912724 A, US1912724A
InventorsJoseph P Remington
Original AssigneeStokes & Smith Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for spreading fabrics
US 1912724 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 6, 1933. J. P. REMINGTON ,7 4

I METHQP AND APPARATUS FOR SPREADING FABRICS.

Filed Nov. 30, 1931 4 Sheets-Sheet l YINVENTOR.

' ATTORNEY. V

June 6', 1933. J =1 REMINGTON 7 1,912,724

I METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR SPREADING FABRICS Fiied Nov. 50, 1951 4 SheetsSheet 2 INVENTOR.

fi ATTORNEY.

June 6, 1933. REMlNGTCN 1,912,724

METdOD AND APPARATUS FOR SPREADING FABRICS Filed Nov. 30, 1951 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTUR.

- 2 ATTORNEY.

June 6, 1933.

J. P. REMINGTON 1,912,724

, METHOD AND APPARATUS, FOR SPREADING FABRICS Filed Nov. :50, 1931 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 fly aa}; 16 Fly I ,2 q INVENTPOR. BY a I 1 ATTORNEY.

Patented June 6, 1933 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE JOSEPH P. REMINGTON, OF IPIHZILADIELIE'HIA PENNSYLVANIA, AS SIGNOR TO! STOKES AND SMITH COMPANY, OF PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA, A CORPORATION OF PENNSYLVANIA METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR SPREADING FABRTCS Applicationfiled November 30, 1931. Serial No. 578,040.

My invention relates to a method of and apparatus for straightening, stretching or spreading cloth, or like yielding material, to reduce deformation thereof and extend the same to substantially its normal dimensions and specifically sheets, towels, napkins, or similar articles, particularly to prepare them for ironing by a mangle, or flat work ironer.

Heretofore in laundries, it has been necessary for operators to pick up the damp pieces individually, shake them to remove wrinkles 1 and then pile them in stacks. The operators pieces are not in proper condition for iron of the ironer remove the pieces from the stack, place them in succession upon the feedbelt of the ironer, and attempt to stretch or spread them sideways by hand. However, as the belt travels at high speed, these operators have insufficient time to maintain a continuous supply of pieces and to stretch them after being laundered a few times, the repcated stretching (in one direction only) so distorts them that it is impossible for the ironer operators to straighten them by hand durin the feeding operation, and the preliminary steps of shaking out and stacking by other operators are necessary. Even then, unless constant diligence "is exercised, the

ing and these preparatory steps are responsible for a large proportion of the cost of laundering.

In accordance with my invention the pieces are successively subjected to shaking by moving mechanical structure, specifically a paddle intermittently engaging and beat effective in, performing the preliminary operation of shaking and spreading the cloth throughout its entire width ensuring that its edges shall pass within the zones of influence of the blasts, and for straightening and unfolding the trailing end of the cloth. \Vrinkles or overf'olds not removed by the paddling action, or which occur after the paddling action, are removed by the fluid blasts, so that the paddle and blasts supplement each other in a particular manner to remove all wrinkles creases or overfolds in the pieces, The combined effect of these means enables a mangle, to which the pieces are fed, to iron perfectly; heretofore, the failure to remove all creases or overfolds caused the mangle to turn out imperfect work, often requiring the work to be done over.

In accordance with one form of mechanical beater structure, a paddle-like member has a vibrating or oscillating movement with a directional component generally in the direction of movement of that portion of the cloth engaged thereby, and assists in feeding the'cloth onto the conveyor or feed belt; specifically, avibrating paddle has an upward movement during each cycle of its operation, and intermittently engages and lifts the free or slack portion of a towel or other piece and creates slack in the form of a loop in the portion of the towel between the paddle and the place of meeting of the towel with a feed belt, which slack is taken up by the feed belt in its forward travel. This results in a series of lifting steps and assists in feeding the towel onto the feed belt instead of producing a back drag on the towel which tendsto retract it.

Specifically, and in accordance with a further modification, the portion of the piece subjected'to the mechanical beating action is simultaneously subjected to a fluid blast; specifically, and as shown, a paddle-like beater has means therein for directingfiuid blasts, as air, against the surface of the cloth engaged by the paddle.

Specifically, and in accordance with another modification, revolvable structure directs fluid blasts against the cloth pieces, either with or without applyin a beating or paddling action thereto, and t e structure has extending portions, 7 for example, ,opposed serrate e ges,

and for illustration of some of the forms,

it may take, reference is to be had to the accompanying drawings in which:

Fig. 1 in perspective illustrates the disposition of nozzle structure at the receiving end of the conveyor of a flat-work ironer in accordance with one modification of i the invention.

Fig. 2 is a plan view of an article of wash, as a towel, having wrinkles and turnedover edges.

Fig. 3 discloses the action of air blasts upon the towel of Fig. 2 in smoothing it and restoring it to its original size.

Fig. 4 is a modified form of the invention, employing mechanical shaking structure in the form of a rotating paddle in combination with air blasts.

in combination with 'mechanical shaker.

structure. I

Fig. 11 illustrates the action of the air blasts upon th edges of the pieces.

Fig. 12 illustrates a baflle late which may be used in combination with the air blasts.

Fig. 13 illustrates a modified form of paddle structure having nozzles therein for directing fluid blasts against the cloth;

Figs. 14 and Mai-are side and end views, respectively, of the paddle of Fig. 13 rotated through an angle of ninety degrees.

Figs. 15 and 15a are side and end views, respectively parts in section, of a further form of padd e structure;

Figs. 16 and 16ware side and end views, respectively, of rotatable fluid blast structure havmg certain advantages.

Figs. 17 and 17a show details of the paddie structure of Fig. 13;

Figs. 18 and 18a show structural details of the paddle of F i 15;

Fig. 19 is a detai of thefluid blast coupling of Fig. 13.

Referring to Fi 1, the roller or pulley 1 rotates with the s aft 2 driven from or in timed relation to the ironing rolls, not shown, of a flat-work ironer. The traveling surface which conveys or feeds the cloth pieces tothe ironer conprises feed-belt structure 3, which passes over the roller 1, and is shown asa single belt, although it is to be understood that it may consist of a series of narrow spaced belts. The roller 4 mounted upon shaft 5 which is journaled in the side frames of the machine, not shown, engages the articles and presses them against the belt 3, within a short time after they are laced thereonby the operator.

T e freshly washed flat-work, as towels, napkins, and the like, are so wrinkled that they must be smoothed before they come into engagement with the ironing r0 Is. As the feed-belt 3 moves at'a fairly rapid rate, for example, sixty feet per minute, it is impossible for the machine operators to keep an uninterrupted supply of pieces on the feed belt and also to smooth them. If the ironer operators take the time to carefully shake and stretch the pieces, the output of the machine is seriously curtailed. Other operators pick up the individual pieces and shake them to remove wrinkles in reparation for the machine operators. ince the pieces are fed in the same direction, i. e., lengthwise, through the ironer, after being laundered a few times they are considerably out of shape; specifically, they have been elongated to substantial extent, the pulling action which has increased their length also reducing their width, particularly near the center. F or example, towels after a few launderings, are much narrower in the middle than at the ends.

The machine operators prior to my invention picked the prepared pieces from the stack and placed them in turn upon the feedbelt and endeavored to smooth them further. In view of the aforesaid high speed of the belt, however, the attempts were in general unsatisfactory. If the speed of the machine were slowed down to'aflord a longer interval of time for smoothing, the cost of laundering was still further and substantially increased.

The towel T, Fig. 2, illustrates generally the appearance of flat-work ready for ironing. As indicated it may be full of wrinkles, the edges may be turned over or under as indicated at 17, and the ends may be far from straight.

To eliminate the preliminary steps of stacking, shaking and stretching the individual pieces, I employ blasts of air, preferably during the feeding of the articles.

- than the width of the towel T, or other article.

The blasts, as indicated, engage the slack portion of the piece immediately adjacent the place of its meeting with the feed belt,

and are directed substantially, at right angles to the direction of feed though there may be a reasonable variation. However, if the departure from this relation is made too great, difiiculty will be experienced by the g blast turning back t leading or trailing edges of the pieces. The air issuing from the jets causes the cloth,- because of its flexibility, to ripple or shake which removes all wrin--- kles. Further, the blast is sulficiently strong to actually stretch the cloth cross-wise. Al-

though the jets of air from the nozzles 9 are directed only against one side of the cloth, the blasts may, if desired, be stron enough to straighten out edges turned bac against the other surface because of the decided whipping action at the edges due to the waves or ripples in the cloth produced by the jets. Although a single pair of powerful jets 9 may be used, it is not desirable, for

the lighter fabrics, since unless the piece is accurately centered, there is a tendency tor the trailing end tocreep sideways on the belt. Preferably, therefore, the blast from the jets 9.is suitably moderate, to efiect removal of wrinkles and some stretching, (Fig. 3), and the blast from a second pair of jets 9' is utilized to complete the stretching and straightening out of edges turned back against the upper surface of the towel.

The blast from the 'e'ts 9' may be quite strong, since the towels in this. position are lying on the belt 3 and are disposed only slightly in advance of the roller 4. The second pair of nozzles, '9', may be carried by. the individual supports 8 adjustable along bar 6' transversely. of the feed belt 3.

In the construction here shown the blasts of air are directed nearly parallel to the surface of the cloth. This has a tendency to permit entrained air drawn from below the jets to tip the edge of the cloth and cause it to' ripple or shake. The angle at which the jet strikes the cloth may be varied 'tosuit conditions or double jets working simultaneously on both sides of the cloth may be used,

The air blasts are capable of substantially stretching the cloth cross-wise, for example, they may increase the width one-half to one c5 inch or more, the amount of stretching varying with different materials, force of the blasts, etc. For all practical purposes, however, it is only necessary for the cloth to be stretched or spread sufliciently to take out the slack in the cloth thus making all edges straight and of the same width. I

prefer to employ properly directed air lasts for this purpose because the pieces cannot be torn during the stretching operation as could readily happen if they were positively gripped by some mechanism and all pulled'out a definite amount. Further, the use of air requires only a small amount of mechanism occupying little space and permits facile and nice adjustment of the stretching force.

The air for the nozzles 9' is supplied from a header 12' through the flexible tubes 10' which slip over the nipples 11' in the header 12'. Similarly the air from the nozzles 9 is supplied from the header 12 through the individual flexible tubes 10,- connected to nipples 11.

The nozzles as previously stated, are adjustable to accommodate diflerent widths of pieces, and several sets of nozzles may be used, some of which may be differently spaced from the others to accommodatethe machine for simultaneous operation upon articles of difi'erent sizes. For example, referring to F i 1, the two right-hand sets of nozzles, 15 an 15' fed by flexible tubes 16 and 16 are set to smooth and stretch the wide towels T, while the left-hand nozzles 9 and 9' are more closely spaced tosmooth and stretch the narrower towels t.

The valves 18 and 18' are preferably provided in the connections from the headers 12 and 12 to the individual nozzles to permit regulation of the blast in accordance with the weight or size ot" the articles; for exam. le, the blast for the heavy towel T may e substantially higher than the blast for the small towels t, handkerchiefs, etc.

The supports 13 and 13' adjustable along bars 6 and 6' carry the baffles 14 and 14' to prevent adjacent air jets operating upon difl'erent pieces, (Fig. 1), from blowing up or turning back the edge of the other towel.

In operating an ironer utilizing my pneumatic spreader, the machine operator picks the pieces up from a mass of damp wash which need not be stacked nor shaken out as heretofore, and places them on the feedbelt 3-at a point above the jets 9 which instantly blast out the under-turned wrinkles 1'! in the pieces and stretch them sideways. As they travel forward on the belt they go under the second set of jets 9' which further stretch them and blast out any. overturned edges or wrinkles 17. Although the pieces lie flat on the feed-belt when subjected to the second set of air ets, the feedbelt does not interfere with the spreading factory or since the air blasts ripple the edges, lifting them from the belt. v

If the work is too dry for satisfactory ironing, suflicient moisture may be introduced mto the air blast to dampen'the work; for example, the blast may be of wetsteam.

On the other hand, if the work is too damp,

the blast may be of hot dry air.

It is also possible to stretch the pieces after ironin but this is not generally satiss esirable, as stronger blasts are required and there is strong tendency for the dry pieces to resume their original condition as soon as the blast stops. The articles while damp have considerable plasticity, are easily stretched by the blasts, and retain their stretched condition as the wet fabric has little elasticity. On the'contrary, the articles when dry possess little plasticity and considerable elasticity.

Fig. 4 shows a modified form of the invention in which mechanical beater structure in the form of a paddle-like member is employed at the receivingend of the conveyor, an

which acts upon the full width of the pieces, so that it may be used either to reheader 12' closed at one end in clamps 28 to the air jets 9' and 15.

place or supplement the first set of air jets shown in the modification of Fig. 1. The action of the beater shakes the cloth violently, simulating manual shaking and spreading of the pieces, and thus causes the cloth or pieces to expand sidewise and assume a normal flat and full extended position.

The roller or pulley 1 rotates with the shaft 2 driven from or in timed relation with the ironing rollers 20 of the flatwork ironer shown. A plurality of feed belts 3' are emp loyed, instead of the single wide belt of ig. 1, although it will be understood that a single wide belt may likewise be employed. The feed belts are moved forwardly in the direction of the arrows toward the ironing rollers 20 so that when the leading edges of pieces of cloth T, t, for example, damp wash, are laid on the belts, the ieces will be carried under the ironing ro lers and into contact with the steam chest surfaces 21 for ironing. Strings 22 are provided to prevent the pieces of damp wash from winding around the ironing rollers 20.

Two side frames 23, 23 are secured, as by la screws, to the floor, and carry two upper si e frames 24, 24 slidably mounted on the frames 23 for purposes of ad'ustment. A pair of arms 25, 25 are hin e at 26, 26 to the frames 24, and adjustably support the air blast mechanism consistin of a pipe or the cap 27 and connected at the other on (not shown) of compressed air. At convenientlocations along the pipe 12' are located the cocks or valves 18 for controlling the flow of compressed air through the flexible hoses 16, and thence through passa es he is carried forwar to a source The mechanical beater structure comprises the following: An angle-iron crossiece 31 is attached to brackets 32, 32 secure to and inte al with frames 24, the angle of the brac ets being suitable for sliding adjustment of the bearings 33, 33 of a mechanical beater in the form of a paddle 34, so that the paddle may be moved toward oraway from the cloth pieces to alter the magnitude of the paddling action. The. paddle is preferably made of non-corrosive metal, such as monel metal, or the like, and has shaft ends 35, 35 turned to fit the bearings 33. On one of the shaft ends (the right-hand end as viewed in Fig. 4), there is mounted a grooved ulley 36 which is driven through a belt 37 om a pulley 38 mounted on the shaft of the motor 39 secured to the frame piece 23. The paddle 34 preferably, although not necessarily, revolves in the direction of the arrow, or against the direction of feed of the pieces of damp wash, since, when revolving in this direction, it is more efii-- feed belts.

In operating the damp wash spreader, th operator picks up a piece of dam wash from. the supply W in the hamper laces it on the feed belts stretching the eading edge sidewise and la ing it on straight and properly centered tween the air b asts. As soon as the operator releases the piece, its strai ht extended leading edge by the feed belts, and since the free or unsupported portion of the piece is now' hanging vertically it comes into contact with the paddle 34, the revolvin edges of which intermittently engage and beat out the wrinkles and extend the piece sidewise with much the same movement, but more efliciently, as is customarily done in both shaking and spreading by hand.

As each piece is advanced by the belts, it comes under the air blasts 9' or 15', and is further stretched and spread, and the overfolds or oven-turned edges unfolded by the violent rippling action of the air blasts, so that the piecesare continuously prepared for the ironing o ration. Havin laced the leading edge 0 one piece on the ,and.

ts, the no operator immediately picks up a second piece and lays it on the belts with its leading edge as close to the trailing edge of the previous piece as possible. The spacing between the pieces may be very small, for example, an inch or so of open space need only be left between pieces, as the operators have none of the customary shaking and spreading to do, but have only to lay the leading edge of each piece properly on the belts.

Fig. 5 illustrates a modified form of paddle structure having serrated edges so as to wipe downwardly upon longitudinal creases in the cloth. Since the operator who places the damp wash on the feed belts stretches it sidewise to its full extent at its leading edge, all longitudinal creases in the unstretched portion of the piece lead diagonally toward the center line of the cloth and toward the trailing edge, and therefore the serrated edges of the paddle tend to stretch the cloth sidewise from the center line. The serrations on opposite edges of the paddle may be staggered, if desired, to increase'this action.

Fig. 6 shows a paddle 41 having bristles 42 inserted in its edges to brush the cloth while shaking and spreading it.

Figs. 7,8 and 9 illustrate a modified form of the shaking mechanism; which may be employed where comparatively little back drag on the cloth is permissible. In this modification, the shaln'ng or beating structure comprises the rectilinear slide bar 43, Fig. 7, which is mounted in guides in the side frames of the conveyor, Fig.8. The slide bar 48 has shaft section 44 extending therethrough, and a connecting rod 45 connects the shaft section with an eccentric 46 mounted on a bearing pin 47 secured to and extending from said frame 2;).- Botatable with the eccentric 46 is a grooved pulley 48 which is driven by a belt 49 running over a pulley on the shaft of a motor 39. The action of the paddle in its upward movement during each cycle of its operation engages and lifts the trailing or slack portion of the towel and creates slack in the form of a loop in the portion between the paddle and the place of meeting of the towel with the feed belt, which slack is taken up by the feed belt in its forward travel. This results in a series of lifting steps and assists in feeding the towel onto the feed beltinstead of tending to. retract it.

ig. 10 illustrates the use of positive feeding means, such as the roller 50, where material of considerable weight and length is to be shaken and spread. The roller is mounted in slide bearings 51 attached to the side frames of the ironer, and the roller is preferably covered with felt and cloth so that there will be no danger of injury to the operators in placing the cloth on the feed belt. The roller 50 has suliicient weight to cause heavy pieces to be carried along by the feed belts, even though there may be considerable back drag from the paddle 34.

Fig. 11 illustrates the action of the air jets, such as the jet 15', on the edges of the damp wash pieces, and shows how the pieces are raised up and'rippled by the air blast. If the .air blast were to force the cloth pieces down against the feed belts, there would be very little effective rippling action unless excessive air volume and pressure were employed, and therefore the jet of Fig. 11 is inclined divergent from the plane of the cloth for maintainin a difference in pressure on opposite surfaces of the cloth, and thereby cause rippling of its edges to remove overfolds therein.

Fig. 12 is a modification of the arrange-v ment of Fig. 11, in which a baflie plate 52 operates in conjunction with the air blast 15 to create a difference in pressure on opposite sides of the piece T to effect ripples adjacent its edges and so remove wrinkles, creases or overfolds therein.

Figs. 13 and 14 illustrate a combined paddle and blast structure in which fluid blasts, as of air, are applied to and directed against that portion of the piece at the time subjected to the beating action of the paddle edges. The paddle comprises a hollow shaft or pipe 53, closed at one end by. a cap 54, and having a coupling 55 connected to its other end for supplying compressed air or other suitable-fluid under pressure thereto from a supply line 56. Secured to opposite sides of the .pipe 54, as by welding, are metal vanes 57, shown in detail in Figs. 17 and 17a, for producing the paddling action. Secured to and in communication with the hollow shaft 54 are nozzles 58 and 58' which direct the fluid blasts outwardly toward the edges of the pieces, so that the same portion of the cloth is simultaneously subjected to mechanical beating and air blast action. The paddle structure revolves in the bearings 33, and is driven through pulley wheel 36 Fig. 15 illustrates a modified form of combined paddle and blast structure, in which vanes 59 have serrated edges 60, these edges being in opposed relation from the centers of the cloth pieces to prevent retraction or shrinking back of the pieces as they are smoothed out and expanded by blasts of air, or other fluid medium, issuing through a multiplicity of small bores 61, shown in section at the left hand end of the paddle. The serrated vanes, without bores, may be secured to the pipe 53, and the bores conveniently drilled at the properi angle through the vanes and pipes. 18a show details of the foregoing construction.

Fig. 16 shows a form of revolvable blast structure which does not have a paddlmg l Figs. 18 and 'in roller towel cabinets.

' tion of the pleces as they are smoothed out and expanded by the blasts of air, or other fluid medium, issuing through bores 61 spaced about the shaft 53, as shown in Fig. 16a.

Fig. 19 shows details of the coupling 55 .of F 1g. 13, in which a gland member 64 is screwed into the bearings 33', and engages a packing ring 65 to provide an airtight connection between the shaft 53 and the coupling.

It will be understood. that, for various purposes, any of the foregoing structures of Figs. 13 to 16 inclusive may be used alone, without additional blasts, with, or to replace, any of the mechanical heater or blast structures illustrated in theother figures of the drawings. It will also be understood that any of the forms of paddles illustrated, or other analogous mechanical beater structure, may be equipped with fluid blast means to give the combined beating and blast action disclosed.

Although the invention has been specifically described and illustrated for preparing individual towels or the like for ironing,

it can be utilized to advantage for stretching cloth or other yielding material in more or less continuous lengths, such as toweling in thirty-foot lengths commonly used It is also within the scope of the invention to utilize the air blasts to smooth and stretch cloth for purposes other than ironing, as forexample, .printin or filling, and the like.

For revity in the appended claims, the

term air is used in a generic sense and comprehends other gases, or vapors, for example steam, either wet or dry, and the term. spreading is used in the sense of smoothing, flattening, stretching, removal of wrinkles, creases, overfolds or turned over edges, "and expanding to normal dimensions.

V The feature of using air blasts to spread pieces upon the conveyor, per se, and broadly in combination with means for a itating or shaking the slack ends of t e pieces, is claimed in my aforesaid coperiding a .plication which also includes claims speci c to the use of air blasts for agitating the slack ends.

What I claim is:

1. In the art of laundering, the method of preparing pieces of wash for ironing, which comprises supporting the leading edge of a piece and advancing it toward the ironer, causing a mechanical beater intermittently to engage the free portions of the piece while in transit, and subsequently directing a fluid blast outwardly towards the edges of the piece transversely of its direction of movement, to remove wrinkles, creases or overfolds therein.

2. An apparatus com rising means for feeding cloth, structure or directing a fluid blast adjacent the surface of the cloth while fed by said means, the blast moving outwardly towards the edge of the cloth transversely of its direction of feed, and mechanical structure for engaging and beating said cloth as it advances toward said feeding means to remove wrinkles, creases or overfolds therein.

3. An apparatus comprising means for feeding cloth, mechanical structure intermittently engagingand beating a portion of said cloth while fed by said means, and means for simultaneously applying and directing a fluid blast to said portion engaged by the mechanical beater, the blast moving outwardly towards the edge of the cloth, to remove wrinkles, creases or overfolds therein.

4. An apparatus comprising means for feeding cloth, structure for directing a fluid blast adjacent the surface of the cloth while fed by said means, the blast moving outwardly towards the edge of the cloth to produce rippling transversely of its direction of feed, and a rotatable paddle-like member intermittently engaging and beating the cloth in transit in advance of said blast for removing wrinkles, creases or overfolds therein. t I

5. The combination with meansfor feeding cloth, of structure for directing a fluid blast adjacent the surface of the cloth while fed by said means, and outwardly towards an edge of the cloth transversely to its direction of feed, bafile structure, and means for disposing it with its baflling surface ap-' proximately parallel to and spaced from said surface of the cloth on the side of, said blast opposite to the cloth to create a difference in pressure on opposite sides of said surface of the cloth to causerippling at its edges.

6. The method of spreading cloth articles 7 which comprises dampening them, supporting the leading end of an article and advancing it along a ath, shaking the trailing slack portion 0 the damp article while in transit,,and simultaneously directing a blast against said slack portion outwardly toward opposite edges thereof to produce recting a blast outwardly toward the side edges of the article to produce ri pling transversely of its movement in sai path.

8. The method of spreading cloth articles which com rises dampening them, spreadin one e ge of the damped article and brlngin it intoconveyin engagement with a traveling surface to e ect advance along a path, directing a blast outwardly toward opposite edges of the article while in transit, and beating the trailing portion of the piece to unfo d it and to ensure that the edges thereof pass within the zone of influence of said blast. j

9. The method of spreading cloth articles which com rises dampening them, spreading one e geof the damped article and brmgin it into conveying engagement with a trave ing surface, and'int'ermittently applying to the trailing portion of the artic e a force which spreads the article and which has a component acting, in a direction to assist advancement of said portion toward said surface.

10. The method of spreading cloth articles which comprises dampenin them, spreading'one edge of the dampe article and bringing it into conveying engagement with a traveling surface, directing a blast outwardl toward opposite edges of the ar-- ticle whi e .in transit to remove folds and wrinkles therefrom, and intermittently applying a force to the trailing portion of t e article to assist its advancement, and to ensure that the edges ofsaid portion shall pass through the zone of action of said blast.

11. Apparatus for spreading damp cloth articles comprising means for conveying the articles substantially free of restraint, nozzle structure disposed to direct blasts against opposite edges of the arti les transversely of their movement by said 0 nveying means, and means adjacent the receiving point of said conveying means foragitating the trailing portions of said pieces and ensuring that the edges thereof shall be acted upon by said blasts.

12. Apparatus for spreading damp cloth articles comprising means for conveying the articles substantially. free of tension, nozzle structure disposed to direct blasts against opposite edges of the articles transversely of component of motion in the direction of movement of articles to assist advancement of their trailing. portions and repeatedly striking said portion to faciiltate the action of said blasts.

14. Apparatus for spreading damp cloth articles comprisin means for conveying the articles substantia ly free of tension, nozzle structure disposed to direct blasts against stantially free of tension, nozzle structure disposed to direct blasts against opposite edges of the cloth transversely of its movement, and heater structure for shaking the cloth in advance of the action of said blasts.

16. Apparatus for spreading 'damp cloth comprising means for feeding the cloth substantially free of tension, nozzle structure disposed to direct blasts against opposite edges of the cloth transversely of its movement, and heater structure, for shaking the cloth in advance of the action of'said blasts having while in engagement with the cloth a component of motion assisting feeding of l the cloth.

17. Apparatus for s reading damp cloth articles comprising l elt structure upon which an operator places the spread edge of an article otherwise wrinkled and folded, beater structure adjacent the receiving point of said belt structure for shaking out the trailin portion of the article during its advance y said belt structure, and nozzles beyond said receiving point directing blasts against gplplosite edges of the articles to remove wries and folds and to restore the article to substantially its original dimen-' sions.

JOSEPH P. REMINGTON.

their movement by said conve ing means,

and heater structure adjacent t e receiving point .of said conveying means for shaking the trailing portion of said pieces to facilitate the action of" said blasts. 13. Apparatus for spreading damp cloth articles comprising meansfor conveying the articles substantially free of tension, nozzle structure disposed to direct blasts against opposite'edges of the articles transversely theirinovement by said conveying means, and beater structure adjacent the recelvmg point of said conveying means having a 1

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Classifications
U.S. Classification38/8, 26/DIG.100, 26/99, 26/98, 271/195, 38/143, 38/2, 26/87, 38/144
International ClassificationD06F67/04
Cooperative ClassificationD06F67/04, Y10S26/01
European ClassificationD06F67/04