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Publication numberUS1913066 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 6, 1933
Filing dateSep 9, 1931
Priority dateSep 9, 1931
Publication numberUS 1913066 A, US 1913066A, US-A-1913066, US1913066 A, US1913066A
InventorsCarter Fred M
Original AssigneeCarter Fred M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Portable insulated building
US 1913066 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 6, 1933. F. M. CARTER PORTABLE INSULATED BUILDING Filed Sept. 9, 1931 3 Sheets-Sheet l jj'ediil. L'artcr June 6, 1933. M, CARTER 1,913,066

PORTABLE INSULATED BUILDING Filed Sept. 9 1951 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 June 6, 1933.

F. M. CARTER PORTABLE INSULATED BUILDING Filed Sept. 9, 1931 I5 Sheets-$heet In 0677 to r jp d 27. Carter Patented June 6 1933 PATENT OFFICE FRED M. CARTER, 01 CONCORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE PORTABLE INSULATED BUILDING Application filed' September 9, 1931.

This invention relates to buildings suitable for use as overnight cabins for tourists, or for other uses such as hereinafter described, and has particular reference to structures of a type capable of being easily shipped in units from the place of production to any location for setting up and use, or to be moved from one location to another.

One of the objects of my invention is to 10 produce such buildings which are low in cost and yet provide places of residence which will be comfortable owing to their being insulated against heat and cold, and rainproof, and as nearly sound proof as possible.

Another object is to provide such buildings which are frameless and yet capable of withstandin inclemencies of weather.

Another ject is to provide such buildings made of sections or units which are easily connectible together to set the buildingsup for use, or which can be readily disconnected to facilitate transportation from one. location to another. a \Vith said objects in view, and others hereinafter explained, my invention consists in the construction and combinations of parts substantially claimed.

Of the accompanying drawings Figure 1 is a perspective view of one of my improved cabins.

Figure 2 represents a transverse section of the same. Fi ure 3 represents a section on l1ne3-3 of Flgure 2, and partly broken out.

Figure 4 represents a section. on line 4-4 of Figure 2.

Figure 5'iis a the floor units.

Figurev 6 represents a section on line 66 of Figure 1, on a larger scale. Figure 7 is a perspective view of one of the wallunits. -Figure8 is a similar view of roof units.

. Similar reference'characters indicate similar parts or features in all'of the views.

'-.-.For convenience of'explanation, the structure of the floor will be first described. I Said floor, when thecabin'iS rectangularwand of perspective view of one of as hereinafter described and.

one of the Serial No. 561,831.

equal dimensions from front to rear and laterally, comprises four units which are uniform in size and shape. Each unit (Fig. 5) consists of boards 10 the ends of which are nailed. to four marginal or base frame strips or sills 11, the latter having holes 12 for bolts presently described.

Such material as referred to for the sheets 13,. 14, is non-metallic and requires no special treatment of any kind to prevent or restrict the transmission of heat. In other words, it is inherently heat-insulating material.

Thewalls are com osed of. sections or units each of which Fig. 7) comprises a single outer sheet 13 and a single inner sheet 14, with intervening spacing strips 15 and intervening marginal strips 16. The sheets 13, 14, are of inherently insulating material such as Masonite or J M board, and the intervening strips 15, 16, may be of wood. Said strips not only provide for holding the sheets 13, 14, apart to provide air spaces in all of the wall units, but also ensure such strength in the units as to require no framework for the walls of the building. The inner and outer sheets and the intervening wood strips are held in their relative assembled positions by nails or brads.

The upper and lower strips 16 have bolt holes 17 (Fig. 7),, and bolts 18 (Fig. 2) pass through the holes in the lower strlp 16 and throu h the holes 12 of the floor sills 11. And t e upper margins of the wall units are similarly secured by bolts 19 to long strips 20 which maintain the wall units 1n close edgewise relationship. Long outer strips 21 (Figs. 1 and 2) are also preferably employed, the bolts 19 passing also through holes in said long strips. To'aidin retaining the wall units in edge. wise relationship, and to cover anycrevices that might exist between "their jabuttingf; edges,vertical batten strips 22 are secured to the margins" of suchabutting "units" screws 23' passing. through the margins of the sheets 13 into the strips 16 (Figs. .lafidf The roof is composed of-sections or uni each of which, like the wall units, consists of two sheets of insulating material similar to the sheets of the wall units, said sheets being spaced by, and strengthened by, intervening wood strips, said sheets and strips being united by nails or brads, all substantially the same as the wall units. The roof units are illustrated at 24 in F igures 1, 2, 4 and 8. Each has a pair of longitudinal struts 25 bolted to it, the ends of said struts being bevelled or notched to fit other parts hereinafter described. Said struts extend along the side margins of the units except the end units each of which (Figs. 4 and 8) has one of the struts some distance in or away from the margin.

Those struts 25 which are marginal are secured to the marginal struts of the adjoining roof units by bolts 26 (Figs. 2 and 4) while the outer struts of the two end units are secured by bolts 27 to the upper margins of the triangular wall units28 (Figs. 1, 2 and 4). Said triangular units 28 are made of material like the units described inconnection with Figure 7 and need no repetition as to their structure.

.As illustrated by comparing Figures 2 and 4, the lower ends of some of the roof struts 25, at opposite sides of the cabin, are congscted together by horizontal bracing strips The lower ends of all of the struts 25, except the outer-most ones of the end roof units, are notched to fit over the long connecting strips 20 of the wall sections or units, and then when the various units are assembled, they are connected together as by hooks 30.

A suitable ridge-covering member is indicated at 31 in Figures 1 and 2, said member being secured by any preferred means. In practice it may sometimes be desirable to employ strips covering the crevices between the roof units, similar to the batten strips 22 em loyed for the wall units.

hen the various units are assembled by the bolts'and hooks described, either before complete assembly or after it, the entire cabin may be mounted in any preferred way, as on posts not necessary to illustrate. And inner sills2may be fitted as indicated at 32 in Figure Some of the wall units are cut out to provide openings for the fittin of windows and a door, which fitting may e efl'ected in any preferred manner.

The building or cabin as a whole is practically frameless and is therefore easily portable in that the various units are readily transportable from one place to another and capable of being set up for occupancy without requiring any 'carpenters work or skilled labor. Therefore if occasion arises for. moving it from one location to another, the cost of transporting it is farless' than would be j required if it had to be moved while in set up condition.

As stated above, the building is practically frameless. This is because the strips 15, 16, are sufficient to effect ample support for the Walls of the structure, and said walls alone, with no additional framing, support the roof. And since said strips are concealed between the sheets 13, 14, the structure as a whole presents perfectly smooth walls bothinside and outside. The said strips serve two purposes. They maintain the two sheets 13, 14, smoothly apart to provide permanent air spaces, and also render entirely unnecessary the employment of any such framework as required inthe usual lightly-constructed buildings.

While I have referred to the structure as being especially suitable for cabins to be occupied as temporary residences, it is to be understood that the same structure is useful for garages, bath-houses, booths for country fairs, etc. Therefore it is to be understood that the term cabin is employed in a generic sense applicable to any building regardless of what is to be accommodated therein.

Having now described my invention, I claim 1. A portable building comprising rectangular floor units having marginal sill stri s providing spaces below the flooring, the wa ls being composed of a plurality of sections each of which consists of'a pair of thin sheets of fibrous insulating material having spacing members at its margins,the sections of each wall having their upper edges bonded together in edgewise abutting relationship by inner and outer strips and bolts exten ing through said strips and the marginal spacing members of the sections, the lower edges of the sections of each wall being bonded together by outer strips and bolts extending through said outer strips and the lower marginal spacing members of the sections and the sill strips of the floor units.

2. A portable building comprising rectangular floor units having marginal sill strips providing spaces below the flooring, the walls beingcomposed of a plurality of sections each of which consists of a pair. of thin sheets of fibrous insulating material having spacing members at its margins, the sections of each wall having their upper edges bonded together in edgewise abutting relationship by inner and outer strips and bolts extending through said strips and the marginal spacing members of the sections, the lower edges of the sections of each wall being bonded together by outer strips and bolts extendingthrough said outer strips and the lower marginal spacing members of the sections and the sill strips of the floor units, and batten strips overlapping the abutting edges of the wall sections. a

3. A portable building comprising rectangular floor units having marginal sill strips providing spaces below the flooring, the walls being composed of a lurality of sections each of which consists o? a pair of thin sheets of fibrous insulating material spaced apart by wood strips at the margins thereof and by vertical wood strips in locations between said margins, said insulating material and the marginal strips being secured tightly together to provide airtight spaces in the sections, the sections of each wall having their upper edges bonded together in edgewise abutting relationship-by inner and outer strips and bolts extending through said str'fis and the marginal spacing members of t e sections, the lower edges of the sections of each wall being bonded together by outer strips and bolts extending through said outer strips and the lower mar 'nal spacing members of the sections an the sill strips of the floor units.

In testimony whereof I have aflixed my signature.

FRED M. CARTER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2850171 *Apr 13, 1953Sep 2, 1958Mader Cabinet Works IncShelf-type display rack
US2901781 *Jan 16, 1958Sep 1, 1959Solomon Sha AgBuilding elements
US4412601 *Apr 17, 1981Nov 1, 1983Cooper Gary DElevator storage system
US4553276 *Mar 9, 1983Nov 19, 1985Fiat Products IncorporatedSectional modular shower cabinets and method and apparatus for making and installing them
US4904017 *Feb 26, 1985Feb 27, 1990Monon CorporationTrailer construction
US5826379 *Dec 30, 1992Oct 27, 1998Curry; PaulHighly wind resistant pre-assembled relocatable building structure
US6073404 *Dec 12, 1997Jun 13, 2000Norfleet; GeorgeModel building
US6108990 *May 15, 1998Aug 29, 2000Klamer; Steven M.Connector for building panels
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/270, 52/461, 119/491
International ClassificationE04B1/343
Cooperative ClassificationE04B1/34315
European ClassificationE04B1/343C