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Publication numberUS1913447 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 13, 1933
Filing dateApr 14, 1930
Priority dateApr 14, 1930
Publication numberUS 1913447 A, US 1913447A, US-A-1913447, US1913447 A, US1913447A
InventorsGilliland Glen C, Higgins Frederick G, Huffman Ford L, Huston Arch C, Percy Simonsen Irving, Schrodeck Edward F
Original AssigneeHuston
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tube forming machine
US 1913447 A
Abstract  available in
Images(8)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 13, 1933. A. Q HUSTON ET AL 1,913,447

TUBE FORMI NG MACHINE Eiled April 14; 195o 8 sheets-sheet 1 June 13, 1933. A. c. Hus'roN 'Er AL TUBE FORMING MACHINE Filed April 14, 1950 8 Sheets-Sheet 2 Hmm m 7% 6 w .Zw W ma fw y y Mw? wf awa 4 w fw June 13, 1933. A. c. HusToN Et A.

TUBE FORMING MACHINE Filed April 1 4, 1930 8 Sheets-Sheet 3 ay. i.

fnf/26g.

June 13, 1933.

A.'c. HUsToN Er AL 1,913,447-

TUE FORMING- MACHINE z Filed April 14, 1950 8 Sheets-Sheet 4 7272???? Loy TUBE FORMING MACHINE MMM June 13, 1933.

A. HusToN Er AL TUBE FORMING MACHINE Filed Apil 14, 1930 8 Sheets-Sheet 6 Q @NN A. c. HUsToN ET AL 1,913,447

TUBE FOHMING MACHINE June 13, 1933.

Filed April 14. 195o a sheets-sheet 7 June 13, 1933.- Afg. HUSTQN Er AL I 1,913,447

TUBE FORMING MAHINE Patented .im 1 3, 1,933

UNITED s'm'rl-a'sl PATENT OFFICE ma c. nusron, mvnm me: smoNsnN, @LEN c. GILLILAND, roar I.. Hmm,

raanmcx G. mueras.` um nnwm r. scnaonncx, or Los aNGELEs, cauroman; sam snronsmt, GILLILAND, Huisman, HIGGINS AND scnnonncx, As-

SIGNQBS T MID HUBTON TUBE rosanna nacnnm Anuman mea april 14, reso. serial in. 444,081.

This invention relates in general to tube forming machines, and is particularly concerned with ymachines fbr manufacturing spirally wound tubing such as paper soda 5 straws, and the like. Although the lnventlon in various of its aspects is applicable to the manufacture of spirally wound tubing in general, it has at present its widest usage in the making of soda straws, and will thereforeA be described hereinafter as embodied in a machine adapted forthis purpose.

Among the foremost objects of the. lnvention is to provide a machine capable of .forming smooth-cut straws of accurately uniform length at a high rate of production. It may be mentioned preliminarily that d iliculty 1s commonlyencountered in the making of pa per straws in cutting them smoothly and into even lengths, due primarily to-the facts that the straw must be severed while moving falrly rapidly, and that usually its rate of movement is not uniform due toslippagethatnecessarlly takes place in the winding operatlon. Various types of tube cutting devices are in use which are designed particularly for the purpose of severing the straw while it is being advanced as formed, and in' such a ,manner as to cause it to be cut 'smoothly and prevented from buckling as a result of the cutting operation.Y so Typical of such cutting devices are some which cause a sharp blade to traverse the path of the straw at such a high rate of speed as to sever the straw so as to not interfere with its advancing movement, and others which cause a cutter to move along with the straw and at the same rate of speed, during the cutting operation, the cutter'in this later type remaining relatively stationary longitudinally of the straw, while severing it. -The cut-oil mechanism in the present machine is of this latter general type, the cutter being' caused to be intermittently moved into and out of the path ofthe straw to sever same, and to move with the straw and at exactly the same rate of 4 speed, while severing it.

In order for the straw to b severed with the desired smoothness by a traveling cutter moving along with the straw, it is desirable that the cutter and straw move together at the same rate, otherwise a rough cut will result. Heretofore it has been proposed to time the movement of the cutter with the operation of the tube winding mechanism. The latter consists, in the usual machine for makmgspirally wound tubing, in a winding element, such as an endless tape, for winding the strip stock from which the straw is formed, about a mandrel, the winding element serving to advance thestraw from the mandrel as' it is formed, aswell as to effect the winding thereofs' In this operation however, a certain amount of slippage, and which it magebe mentioned is desirable, always occurs tween the winding element and the strawbeing formed on the mandrel, with the result that the rate of propulsion of the formed straw will vary somewhat. 'Variation inthe rate of propulsion 'of the formed straw of course results in variation of the relative speed of the cutter and straw, thus making it virtually impossible to cause both to move at the same uniform speed, which is a necessar requisite for smooth cuttin This diiliculty is overcome in accorrance with the present invention by causing the 75 formed straw and cutter to travel together at the 'same speed while the cutter is moved into the path of the straw tosever it, by' op-v erating t e cutter in timed relation to a suitable mechanism for feeding or releasing the strip stock to the winding mechanism, instead of timing the operationof the cutter with that of the winding mechanism, as pre` viously practiced. Sincey it is readily possible to feed the strips to the Winder at a constant rate, by proper regulation of the novement of the cutter, the latter may be caused to travel. at exactly the same rate as the formed straw. In the present machine for v'certain advantageous reasons the winding 9A y ment mechanism preferably is operated in a mancutter is operated in Atimed relation with the rate of feed, the relative movement between the cutter and formed straw is independent .of whateverfslippage that may occur in the winding operation.

As previously mentioned, in usual machines of this character the `winding element comprises an endless tape wound about the mandrel. Although in the broader aspects of the. invention, any suitable form of winding or tube forming means. may be used in the .present machine, the improved winding device will be preferred over the usual winder such asan endless tape for various reasons which /will hereinafter appear. The present type of Winder may be generally described ascomprising a pairof rollers disposed at opposite sides of the mandrel and mounted angularly with relation thereto, the rollers being adapted to be rotated so as to cause the strip stockto be spirally wound on the mandrel and the formed tube to be propelled to the cutting device. The winding rolls are ycapable of adjustment so as to vary the rate of advancement of the tube in the mandrel to vary toa certain degree the pitch of the wind and also to wind tubes of various diameters.

As will later be more fully explained, the

winding mechanism, bypvirtue of itscapability of varying the pitch of the wind, also is capable, within certain limits, of varying fthe speed at which the formed tube is ad.

vanced. This feature is of advantage in that the timing of the feed release with the cutter operation'need not necessarily be so precise that the movement of the formed tube, as governed by the rate of feed release, will berexactly that of the cutter, since 'the Winding mechanism may be adjusted tot regulate the movement of the tube to a nicety such that its travel will correspond to that of the cutter travel. In other words, the winding mechanism may serve the purpose of a secondary or final means for controlling the rate of movement of the tube in-accordancefwith that of the cutter.

We have also provided what broadly may be considered a carrier which is adapted to receive the severed tubes directly from the cutter mechanism, and to move the severed tubes transversely out of the path of the advancing tube being formed. The .characteristics of operation of the carrier are such thatimmediately, or soon after a tube is severed, that tube is advanced ahead of the subsequent tube being formed, a rate of moveeater than that of 'said tube being forme and without interfering with its advancing movement. The carrier serves also asl a heater whereby the straws after having been paraiined, are automatically maintained for a predetermined length of time atV a temperature such as will allow the paraffine to thoroughly permeate the straws and thereby render them liquid proof and resistant to hotliquid. The combined heater and carrier thus operates to automatically take the straws directly from the cut-oli:l and heat them for a certain length of time before delivering them to the finished straw container.

The above and additional features and objects of the invention will be understood most readily and discussed to best advantagel in the following detailed description of a machine representing a typical and preferred embodiment of the invention. Reference is had for `purposes of description to the accompanying Fig. 5 is a plan View of Fig. 4; i Fi -6 is an enlarged section on line 6 6 of Fig. 4, showing particularly the gearing -of Vthe maindrive shaft with the winding roller and feed release shafts;

. Fig. 7 isvan enlarged fragmentary section ony line 7 7 fof Fig. 5,'showing the winding roller mounting'and the roller drive shaft; Fig. 8 is a fragmentary View on line 8 8 of Fig.' 6, showing the cutter operating cam wheel in end elevation;

Fig. 9 is an enlarged fragmentary section taken longitudinally through the cut-od dey vice as indicated by line 9 9 of Fig. 5;

F ig. 10 is a section on line 10 10 of Fig. 9, the cutter being shown advanced into severing position ;I

Fig. 11 is a section on line 11 11 of Fig. 6;

Fig'. 12 is a fragmentary enlarged side ele vation of one of the winding rollers and its mounting, as viewed on line 12-12 of Fig. 5;

f Fig. 13 is an elevational view as indicated on broken line 13 13 of Fig. 5;

Fig. 14 is an enlarged fragmentary section on line 14-14 of Fig. 1

Fig. 15 is an enlarged section through the /parafiine container indicated on line 15 15 of Fig. 4; f

Fig. 16 is an enlarged plan view of the cutoil' device and the heater and heater operating other parts associated therewith in corresponding positions; i

Fig. 17 is similar to Fig. 16 but illustrates the parts in changed positions after the straw has been severed;

Fig.; 18 isa side velevation of the carrier andL its operating mechanism, as viewed from the front of Fig. 16, on line 18,-18;

Fig. 19 is a sectional end elevation taken on line 19-19 of Fig. 16;

Fig. .20 is a fragmentary venlarged section on line 20-20 ofFig. 16, showin the escapement and heater-operating ratc et gears in one position; and y Fig. 21v is a section similar toFig. 20 illustrating the gears in changed position.

Referring first to Fig. 1, the machine may be characterized generally as comprising, the feed release and adhesive applying mechanism generally indicated at 20; the winding mechanism 21 for forming the strip stock released from the mechanism 20 into spirally wound straws; the cut-off mechanism generally indicated at 22, which operates to sever the formed straws into equal lengths; and the carrier and heater 22a wherein the severed and externally parained straws are subjected toheating for a suitable period of time. The feed release and adhesive applying mechanism 20, is supported on a table or. bed 23,

which extends angularly with relation'to bed 24 supporting the winding, cut-off and carrier mechanisms, the parts being arranged in this manner in order to enable the strip stock to be taken s'traight'from the feed release to the mandrel .and at the proper angle relative thereto. The inventionwill perhaps bemost clearly understood by describingthe various parts of the machine in the order `in which they operate'upon the strip, stock, beginning with the feed release and adhesive applyingl mechanism; then describing the winding and 4 cut-oil:l mechanisms, and finally the automatically operated heater and carrier.

It will be understood that any suitable means may be used for feeding or releasing the strip stock to the winding mechanism, it only being required that the stock feed or release mechanism, `whichever'it may be con'- sidered, be capable of feeding the strips at a constant rate and of' operating in timed relation with the cutting mechanism. The release mechanism hereinafter described is u. therefore to be considered merely as `typical of any suitable means for feeding or releasing the strips at a constant rate.

1 Referring particularly`to Figures 2 and 3 of the drawings, double rolls of the strip stock are carried on reels` 26 mounted on a support 27, the strips 40 and 41 beingledv from the reels between a pair of friction rollers 28 and 29. Roll 28 is carried on shaft 30 which isl driven by way of shafts 33- and 34 through bevel gears 31, 31a and 32, 32a. Gear 32ais carried on the end of sleeve 53 fwhich is jour-.

frictionally release the'strips.

It will suffice tostate at this point that shaft 33, and7 therefore rollerl,28, is operated in timedrelation with the cut-off mechanism 22,

further details of the shaft drive being described at a later point. Roller 29 is carried on an eccentric extension 36a of shaft 36 (see Fig. 14) and is operated to be thrown into and out of such close; proximity to roller. 28 as to frictionally hold the `strips therebetween, by rotating shaft'j36. Thus during operation,

the strips are advanced betweenthe rollers -due to the rotation of roller 28, and at the exact' peripheral speedof rthe latter. The

feed of stock to the Winder may be stopped at will however, by swinging roller 29 to the dotted position 29a, as described, so as to Shaft 36 may be rotated, and roller 29 swung from operating position to the dotted line releasing position 29a, by operating arm 37 secured to shaft 36, by wayA of rod 38 and lever 39. Lever 3.9 is'preferably loc-ated nearv the winding and cut-off 4mechanism in order` thatshould the stripsl or formed tube become fouled at any time during their passagcthrough the Winder and cut-off, the operator will be able to stop the feed without having v'to shut down' the entire machine. v v

In order to. prevent' slippage of the strips between the rollers, one or both of the rollersmay be provided with a peripheral facing of rubber or other suitable material. In the From the lfeed release mechanism described, the strips 40 and 41 pass through guides 42 and 43 over an adhesive applying present case, the power roller 28 isentirelyfv I' roller 44, the lower portion of which is immersed with-in a heated body of adhesive contained in the glue pot 45. The adhesive is heated and maintained at the desired fluiditv by means of anelectrical heatingelement 46 extending within water'jacket 45a surrounding the glue pot, the jacket being supin the adhesive at one side of the partition so that as the roller is'rotated, it tends to cause the adhesive to circulate around the partition as indicated by the arrows. Rollerl 44 may' be operated in any suitable manner,

for example by means of pulley 50 on the roller shaft 51, the pulley being driven by vbelt 52 extending around sleeve 53. The

strips pass from the adhesive applying roller 5 44 over a scraper 54 which serves to remove excess adhesive from Athe strips, the removed adhesive .dropping back into the glue pot. It is of considerable importance that the adhesive applied to the strips have justthe right moisture content at the point at which the strips are wound together on the mandrel, in' order for the straws to be properly formed. So subject is the adhesive to moisture changes between the applying `roll 44 and the mandrel, due to changes in atmospheric temperature and humidity, that it becomes desirable to provide means for varying, in eiect, the j time during which the coated strips are exposed to the air, in\accordance with 'atmospherigc conditions. For this purpose, we mount the described strip release mechanism and glue pot on a frame F which is supported on rollers R on top f bed 23. Thus by turning handle lever H which operates one of the rollers, the frame F and all parts supported thereon may be moved longitudinally on the bed so as to vary the distance of roll In order to permitv 44 from the mandrel. such movement of the frame, rod 38 ismade in relatively longitudinally movable sections 38a,38b, the latter ,slidably terminating in a sleeve 380 secured to section ,38a by set screw 38d. 'The feed release and adhesive applying mechanisms may be operated from shaft 33 regardless of the positionof frame F on the bed, since sleeve 53, journaled in the end members of the frame, and from which both said mechanisms are driven, is

,4o slidable longitudinally on the shaft spline .One of the strips 40 is passed over al roll 55, see Fig. 13, which serves to coat the reverse side of the strip with paraiiine, the strip being twisted in its travel from roll 44,` as indicated in Fig. 1, so as to present the side not coated with adhesive, to the paraiine ap-d plying roll. As shownin Fig. 13, the latter vhas its lower portion submerged within a -50 parafline bath in container 56, the paraiiine being heated by means of heating element 57 in the lower portion of the container. Strip V40 is then wound about the mandrel with the parained side adjacent thereto.

r511i Strip 41 is passed beneath a guide 58 and 05 the mandrel 'consists of a, horizontal, rod extending longitudinally of bed 24 and terminally carried onpost 61. The mandrel preferably is warmed by .an internal electrical heating element having lead wires 62, this being desirable in order to promote free sliding of the parailined inner surface of the straw on the mandrel, and to accelerate setting of the glue, due to the moisture being driven out by the heated mandrel.

In the broader aspects of the invention any suitable windingmechanism may be employed which will operate to wind and ad- Vance the formed tube on the mandrel at a rate atleast equal to, and preferably have a tendency to advance the tube at a rate greater, .than that permitted by the feed release. As previously mentionedhowever, the illustrated type of Winder has numerous advantageous features which render it preferable over the heretoforeused devices.

The winding mechanism comprises'a pair of rollers 64 and 65 mounted at opposite sides of the mandrel and inclined relative thereto 1n opposite directions. Each of the rollers is supported on a carrier or yoke65b and rotatably mounted on pintle shaft 66 journaled in bearings 67 and 67a in the upper and lower portions of the yoke. The yoke and roller assembly is supported on a slide rest 68 which has an integral post 69 within which a trunnion 70 on-the yoke is journaled, the trunnion normally being clamped within the post by means of screw 71 so as to pr'event turning movement of the yoke. Slide rest 68 is adjustable laterally of the mandrel between guide strips 72, and is lixedrin adjusted posltion by means of lock nuts 73 on rod 74 extending through bearing 75. As shown most clearly in Fig. 7, thebottoin face of the base portion 65a of the yoke is cylindrically shaped longitudinally of the slide rest, and is seated within a correspondingly shaped recess 76 in the latter, the'center of curvature of the recess being about the axial center of trunnion 70 so as to permit the yoke to bear flush against the slide;v rest for all positions of lateral adjustment. Thus by virtue of the capability of the yoke for adjustment about its trunnion, the position of inclination pf the roller relative to the mandrel may be adjusted as desired. For all positions of the' rollers relative to the mandrel, their center of bearing against the mandrel will-be in line with the axis of trunnion 70. It may be mentioned that as the rollers are brought toward positions of parallelism with the mandrel, the tendency is for them to advance the straw at a greater rate than when moved toward positions of greater angularity with the man'- drel, and to increase the pitchv of the wind..- As will readily appear, the rollers, in pro-v ducing their winding action on the strips, move angularly in opposite directions relative to the mandrel.

10 the limits of pitch variation which can be broughtv about by adjustment of the rollers,

the speed of advancement of the formed tube may be regulated accordingly. The lock nuts on rods 74 are adjusted so as to cause the rollers to bear more or less snugly against the straw so as to insure that the strips being fed to the mandrel will always be taut. On the other hand however the engagement of the rollers with the straw will be such as to permit a certain 'amount of slippage therebetween in accordance with the differential in rate at which the strips are released and that at which the rollers tend to advance the straw, due to the fact that most generally the rollers will tend to advance the straw at a greater rate than that permitted by the feed release.

, The Winder rollers preferably are provided with bearing surfaces 77 of a fairly soft rubber in order to insure the required fric.- tional engagement with the A'straw and to provide a greater surface contact rollers and straws. Although th pressure of the rollers against the surface of the straw will be such as to permit slippage therebetween, it will be suicient to cause the rubber I bearing surfaces 77 to fit around and grip a considerable surface area of the straw, tlere.-

i by firmly pressing the strips together to form some instances it may be desirable to provide more than Atwo windin rollers arranged about the mandrel, but or inarily in the mak- 'ing of small tubes such as soda straws, two oppositely arran ed rollers of the character described will su ce.

Each of the winding` rollers 64. and is driven by way of what may be termed flexible shafts 79 and 80 journaled at their'lower ends in brackets 81 and 82,'respectively, depending from the .underside of the supporting bed 24. Each ofthe roller drive shafts is made up of upper and lower sections inter- 6 5 thel main drive shaft of the machine as will Ween the a compactly wound straw. By maintaining" as previously descri be described. The upper ends of shafts 79 and extend through openings 87 and 88 in the bed 24 and slide re'st 68, respectivel and i carry bevel gears 89, the shank or nec rtions of which are journaled in the yoke ase 65a as indicated in Fig. 7. Gears 89 mesh with bevel gears 89a keyed to the winding rollershaft 66. A

A main drive shaft 90 journaled in hangers 91, 91a, 915,v and 910, is driven by motor'92 by way of chain 93-and the gear box conventionally indicated at 94, the Shaft being rotated in the direction ofl arrow R, see Fig. 8. Rotatably mounted on the drive shaft is a master gear 95 having a tapered portion 95a, giving it the characteristics of` both a spur and bevel gear. During normalwoperation of the machine, gear 95 is driven from shaft 90 by way of the ratchet mechanism generally indicated at 96, comprising a ratchet gear 97 (see Fig. 11) which is keyed to the shaft and caused to enga e the pawls 98 carried on the back side of a ange 99 integral with gear 95,

when the drive shaft rotates in the dlrection of arrowvR. It may be mentioned that'the ratchet connection between gear 95 and the drive shaft is emplo ed in order tov enable manual operation o the feed release and winding mechanism without operating the lc ut-oif, as will presently bel described. l

gears 85 and 86, respectively. The relative .positions ofthe latter gears of course remain constant since whatever adjustment of the winding roll mountings may be made, is taken care of by the universal joints 84 and 84a. n I

The feed release operating shaft 33 extending longitudinally along the side of bed 23,

n also in the glue ot su porting frame F ged. haft 33 is driver from the main drive shaft by way ofbsvel is ournaled beneath bed 24 in hanger '106' gear 105 ,meshing with the beveled or tapered portion of gear 95.A

'The straw passes from the mandrel 'as at 113 to expose substantially half the diameter of the straw to the cutter, as will more fully-be explained hereinafter,

The cut-oil mechanism, generall designated at 22, comprises a rotating disk cutter 114 mounted on shaft 115 carried on a supporting yoke 116. yCutter 114 (preferably, though not necessarily, is rovide with very small saw teeth 114a. 'Yo e 116 is shaped to provide arms 11611., 1166, within which `are contained tle shaft thrust bearings 117 and i through a guide tube 110 mounted on' a suit-` able support 111, thev tube havinga, flared or 118. Any longitudinal play that may develop in the cutter shaft may be taken up by plug 119 threaded in arm. 116m and bearing against the thrust bearing 117. It will suice to state at this point that the cutter and yits supporting yoke is intermittently freely longitudinally -on the \shaft so thatv during reciprocating movement of the shaft, the pulley remains substantiallyin one position relative to the motor without causing dellection of the belt in the direction of lmovement of the shaft. Belt 121 is Sulliciently flexible so as to permit lateral movement of the shaft away from the motor as the cutter is brought into the path of the straw. s

v The cutter shaft carrier 116 is mounted upon what may be^termed a compound slide rest, having such characteristics as will vpermit the cutter to travel along with the straw and to simultaneously move transversely into the paththereof, that is within guide tube yrecess 113,l during the cutting operation.

The compound slide rest comprises a carriage block 125 conlined between'guide pieces 126 extendin longitudinally of the supporting bed-24, b ock'125 bein adapted to intermittently move reciproca ly between guidesl 126 in a Ipath parallel with cutter shaft 115 and the path of movement of the straw. A

vsecond slide rest, movable transversely of the direction of movement ofblock 12,5, is provided by the base portion 127 of yoke 116,

said base being -seated `within transverse groove 128 formed in the carriage block. The upper slide rest is held within groove 128 by means of' pieces 130 extendmg within grooves 131 in the side of base 127. Relative transverse movement between the upper and lower slide rests is resisted by spring 132 inserted within grooves 1331- and 134 formed in the top and bottom surfaces of block 125 and base 127 respectively.. Spring 132 is confined between stop lugs 135 and 136 projecting within the grooves, and which serve, should the hereinafter described cam arm 153be removed, to limit the travel of the upper slide rest, and therefore the cut- 140 projects upwardly above the top surface of supporting bed 24 through opening 143, so as to bring shoulder 141 and the inner end of the wheel adjacent the end of block- 125. A cam follower roller 144 is mounted on `pin 145 in the end of block 125, 'and is caused to bear against cam face 141 and end portion 140e of wheel 140 throughout rotative movement of the latter.k Roller 144 is urged against the `cam face 'on wheel- 140 by the action of spring 146 placed about a longitudinal reciprocating guide rod 147 joined Fat 148 to slide block 125, and lextending through bearings 149 and 150. Spring 146 is conlined between the stationary bearing 149 and collar 151, theflatter being adjustable longitudinall on rod 147 so as to regulate the tension o the spring.

The operation of the lower slide rest wheel facer 141 at a point C furthest istant from the end e of; the cam wheel. suming the cam wheel to rotate in the direc-` tion of arrow R,as shown in Fig. 8, upon rotation of the cam through the angular distance between points C and A, the latter lbeing the point at which cam face141 conforms to the end face-140a of the cam'wheel, slide rest 125 is moved the full length of its travel to the left, carrying with it the cutter 114 at the same rate of movement as the straw. During travel of the cam past the roller between points A and B, the slide rest` remains stationary at the end of its travel, and thereafter as the cam `rotates a distance corresponding to the spacing between points B i and C, the slide rest, under the action of spring 146, returnsto its original position to the right.

`. The transversely moving-upper slide rest 127 is o rated by wav of arms 153 andA 154 mounte on a rock. shaft 155 journaled in hanger 156, see Figs. 4 and 6.P Terminally carrled on arm 154 is a roller 157 which rides the peripheral surface of wheel 140-to the right of cam shoulder 141, roller 157 being urged into engagement with the surface of the cam wheel by-sprin'g 158 attached to the armand the-cam shaft hanger 915. Arm 153 also carries aterminal .roller 159, see Fig.

` maintain roller 159 at all times in. engage-- '1,913,447'fV f l 10, which bears against the side' edge iof the upper slide rest 127, spring`132 operating to ment with said upper slide rest.

0n the periphery of cam wheel 140 is a raised surface 160, see Fig. 8, which, when brought past roller 157, causes arm 154 to swing outwardly and arm 153 to swing inwardly in` a reverse direction to move the upper slide rest. Cutter 114 is thus moved into the path of the straw in the position.

shown in Fig. 10', and is maintained in this position throughout the greater portion of the travel of the lower slide rest toward the left. The pointD at'which arm 154 is initially vswung outward 'to move the cutter into severing position will be located at such a point that the inward movement of the cutter will occur slightly after the starting of the movement of the lower slide rest toward the left, or in other words soon after the start of travelof lthe cutter `with the straw. The period of .time during wh1ch t h e c utter is maintained in its severing position -will be substantially the same or slightly less' than the time interval during which the lower slide rest is ca used to move to the leftf and the cutter to travel with the straw. Point E, will be so' located as to cause the cutter to moved out of the path of the'straw substantially at, or ver soon before the limit of its movement with the stra-w. y i

As hereinabove explained, -in order to as-v sure that the straw will be smoothly cut, it

is essential that the cutter 114 travel at ex- 'A the same rate of speed as the straw actly r during the cutting operation. Due to the fact that the cut-olf mechanism and the feed" release are both operated from thesame drive shaft 90 as described, it will be noted -that the two mechanisms, are operated in certain timed relation.v Thus by the proper design of cam 141 in accordance with the operation of the feed release through gears 31, 32 and 105, cutter 114 may be caused totravel at precisely the same rate of movement as the straw.

As previous explained, the advancing movement of t e straw from the mandrel may be controlled by varying the pitch of the wind by adjusting the winding rollers, as lwell as by controlling the rate of feed release, Therefore, should there exist a dif ferential in the rate of travel of the cutter,

Aand the rate of advancing movement of the straw, due to inaccuracies in timing the operation ofthe feed release with that of the cutter, the speed of movement of the straw L manually twist the strips'for a few turns maybe adjusted to a nicety, and to'correspond exactly with the cutter'travel, by'

about the mandrel and to feed them between necessity for having to operate the entire machine while such preliminary adjustments are being made, means is provided for manually and selectively operating the Winder and feed release to start the straw on the mandrel. For this purpose an auxiliary shaft 162 operated byl hand wheell 163 is geared to shaft 100 as at 164. By turning wheel'163, the winding rollers Aare operated throughgears 85, 102 and 86, 103, and the feed release "through gears 95,101and 105, v

as previously, described. However, since in this case gear 95 is driven by gear 101, instead ofby the drive' shaft through the ratchet mechanism 96, gear 95 may turn-about shaft 90 without" rotating the latter and without causing the cut-off mechanism to \operate.

In passing between the winder and ,cut-oil mechanisms the straw is externally coatedwith vparailin by the device generally indicated at 165, and shown in detail in Fig. 15. The device 165 comprises a container 166 within which is a body of melted paratlin 168 heated .by an electrical heating element 169 flows to a brush 171 which engages the outer surface of the straw S. The delivery of pa'raiin to the brush may be re ulated by suitable valve means as at 172. ue to the straw being continuously rotated as it ,is ad? vanced, its entire exterior surface Willa be cpated with par-ain in-moving past brush 1 1.

We have provided, in combination with `the hereinabove described parts, a carrier theA subsequent advancing straw beingl` formed. The carrier also has the characteristics of a heater, whereby the severed straws are heated for a predetermined period of time suilicient to cause the exteriorly andv internally applied par-alim to permeate the straws and thereby give them a maximum' degree of waterproofness. The combined carrier and heating device comprises an -intermittently rotatable cylindrical cage, generally indicated at 174, having axial trunnions n17 5, 176, journaled in bearings 177 and 178,-'respectively- A. suitable heating e1es ment, not shown, is provided within the heat- 'er cylinder 174, the heating element having leads communicating with surfaces 179 on trunnion 176, and 'to which current is supplied through brushes 180. Cylinder 174 will be maintained at a temperature such that ,during the/period within which the straws are subjected to heating, as will be herein-V afterdescrib'ed, the parailin will be caused to thoroughly and evenly permeate the straws.

5 'the Winder rollers. In order to obviate the In the surface of cylinder 174 is formed 130 i a series of longitudinal lutings or grooves 181 which are adapted to successively receive the straws as they are advanced from the cutoff, asfwill presently appear. The position of the carrier relative to guide tube 110 is such that one of the grooves 181, for example. groove 181a`in Fig. 16, will be in div rect .alinement with the guide tube, so that the straw being advanced from the cut-oilv carrier cage is intermittently revolved in the direction of arrow X, see Fig. 19, an angular distance l corresponding to the spacing be- VAtweeny grooves 181, and in a manner such that after one of the severed straws is advanced into one of the grooves 181, the carrier is instantaneously revolved so as to bring the next groove into alinement with guide tube 110 so as to be in position to receive the f next straw. Due to the fact that the straws are being formed and advanced at a fairly fast rate, it is necessary that the cage be rapidly, and in fact almost instantaneously, revolved between the described intervals of rotation, in order to prevent a subsequent straw, after one has been advanced into one of grooves 181, from becoming fouled by engaging a rib 183 between that groove and the next succeeding. We have accordingly provided what may be termed a trip, or snapacting mechanism for intermittently and rapidly actuating the carrier in the manner described, and have 'also provided a similar type of mechanism for advancing each severed straw into the carrier grooves ahead of the subsequent straw being formed.

The carrier is intermittently rotated by means of an arm 185 pivoted for horizontal swinging movement on pin 186, the arm car.

rying on its. end 185a a' pivoted pawl 187 which engages ratchet gear 188 carried on the end of trunnion 176. Pawl 187 is maintained in engagement with ratchet teethv by spring 189, as shown in Fig. 19.- Arm 185 is operated to actuate the heater cage by means of spring 190 attached to the. outer end of the arm. The pitch o the teeth ratchet 188 will Carrier 174 is operated in timed relationA with the operation of the cut-off mechanism,

by actuating arml85 in accordance with the movements of guide rod 147, which, it will be recalled, reciprocates with the described slide rest block 125.v Rod 147 carries a collar 191 upon which is mounted a supporting arm 192 extending above and parallel with saidv rod toward the cut-olf mechanism. When 'rod 147 isin its furthest position to the right,

- Upon subsequentl movement of rod 147 to the left, collar`19l is moved away from the arm so as to put the latter under the influence of spring 190, which tends to swing the arm about pivot 186 and to rotate the ratchet 188 yand the carrier in the direction of arrow X.

Such movement of the carrier is prevented however; until rod 147 reaches substantially the limit of its travel to the left, by the escapement means, hereinafter described. At the point at which ratchet 188 is released by the escapement mechanism, arm 185 is suddenly swung by the action of spring 190 to the position shown in Fig. 17, the ratchet simultaneously being rotated the pitch distance of the teeth. rlfhe position to which arm 185 is swung is limited by the adjustable stop 194. Due to there being a constantly applied force tending to swing the arm in operatingthe ratchet, that is, by the action of spring 190, at the point at which the ratchet is released by the escapement, the carrier is, literally, snapped from one position to the next with a rapid speed of movement. Upon return movement of rod 147 tothe right, co1

lar 191 engagesarm 185, returning "it to the position of Fig. 16 and bringing pawl 187 into engagement with the next ratchet tooth. Y Carried on trunnion 176 at the inner side of bearing 178 is a second ratchet gear 195, the tooth pitch of which is twice that of ratchet 188', so that for each of the described intermittent movements of i;heilatter, ratchet 195 will be rotated half the pitch distance of its teeth. The operation of ratchet 188 is controlled byl an intermittently rotated escapement gear 196 mounted on vertical shaft 197, and having vertically spaced, down- 196a, 1961;, one ofwhich is engaged by one of the teethof ratchet 195. Escapement gear 19'6 has an integral lower ratchet gear 198, `the tooth 4pitch of which corresponds with the horizontal or radially angular pitch of the downwardly facing teeth 196a and.196b, so that as the escapement is rotated the pitch distance of the teeth of ratchet 198, the escapement gear will turn, for example, from fr the position shown in Fig. 20, in which the ratchet tooth 195e engages one of the lower teeth 1966, to that of Fig. 21 wherein tooth 195a is brought into engagement with an adjacent upper tooth 196m Upon subsequent movement of the escapement gear from the position of Fig. 21, ratchet tooth 19511 will be released from tooth 196a and the following ratchet tooth will become engaged by the next lower escapement tooth. The vertical pitch or spacing of the downwardly facing loa ratchet 195 to rotate half its pitch distance for each -turn of the escapement gear. Ratchet 188 is thereforev permitted to turn the pitch distance of its yteeth for each movement of the escapement gear.y

Gear 198 is intermittently loperated by means of a p a-wl arm 200 pivotally mounted at 201 on the under side of'supporting arm 192, arm 200 being adapted to intermittently f engage ratchet 198 upon movement of guide rod `147 to the left, as will presently appear.' Arm 200 normally is positioned in engagement with stop pin 202 by spring 203, joined to the forward end of the pawl and to arm 192. j f

We will now describe briefly the operation of the escapement mechanism in combination with the hereinabove described carrier actu` ating arm- 185. Uponmovement of rod y147 tothe left, pawl arm V200 is brought into engagement with ratchet 198, turningthe escapement gear 196 so that at substantially the end of movement of' rod 1/47,'ratchet 195 will be released bythe escapement so as to permit ratchet 188 to turn as described, ,and therefore to permit the carrier to rotate a distance corresponding to' the spacing of its longi- I tudinal surface grooves. In order to prevent back lash, or reverse rotation of'ratchet 188, a detent 205 mounted in post 206, see Fig."19, is provided, its action being to snap in behind the successive ratchet teeth and thereby prevent reverse movement. Upon return Inovment of guide rod 147 to the r1ght,arm 200 is permitted to pass by the ratchet and to thereafter resume its'normal position, prior to subsequent movement to the left, as will be readily understood.

As previously mentioned a secondary snap acting mechanism is Vprovided for advancing a severed straw into the carrier ahead of thel straw being formed, in orderjto provide a time interval for turning movement of the "cage to prevent the on-coming str aw from engaging one of the ridges 183 during turnving movement of the cage, and also to prewhich projects through an opening 211, see

l Fig. 18, in the side of cover 182, and into engagement with the straw being advanced intogroove 181er..y Placed on rod 207 isa v spring 212 which is confinedA between nut 213 threaded on the rod anda vertically extending arm 214 attached at its base at 215 to the lower cutter slide rest 125. lThus as the cut.

: olf mechanism assembly is moved to the left,

arm 214 puts spring 212 under compression, 'the latter thereby exerting a thrust on rod .207 tending to move it inthe direction of movement of the straw being advanced yiiizto groove 181e. K Y

Rod 207 is releasably locked againstrsuch movement by dog 217 pivotally mounted onounted on the vunder side of arm 192 and' adjustable longitudinally thereof is a dog actuating arm 218, projecting beneath rod 207 so as to engage the lower end of the dog vas rod 147 is moved to the left.

after the straw has been severed by cutter 114. Thus at the point at which rod 207 is' released by theaction of dog 217, the rod is suddenly thrown forward under the action of spring 212, and the severed straw is simultaneously carried forward by the flexible arm 210. Due to the compression and sudden release of spring 212, the rate `at which the straw is advanced into the cage will of course be much greater than its normali rate of I' movement under the influence of the Winder, andtherefore there will be aconsiderable gap between the severed straw and the following straw being formed.y Immediately after the severed straw has been advanced into the cage grooves in the manner describe-d,lv the carrier.

will be rotated under the action ofthe escapement mechanism as previously described, to bring the next oove 181 into straw receiving position. s rod 147 is returned to its 'starting position to the right, armv218 is brought to engage nut 213 and to thereby move rod 207 to the right until it again becomeslocked by the action of dog 217..

In case the severed straws are not. ad-

vanced entirely within the grooves of the carrien cage Iby the action of arm 210, means ma be ,provided for pushing the. projecting en s of the straws into the cage as the latter rotates. For this purpose we have illustrated a circular gathering flange 220 secured to thercover 182 at the forward end thereof,

fiange 220 gradually curving inwardin the direction of rotation of the carrier. Thus as thel carrier rotates, the projecting straws are moved entirely within the grooves by engagement with flange 220 as will be readily understood from the illustration in Figs.v 1 6 and 17. As shown in F ig. 19, an opening 221 yis formed `longitudinally in bed 24 beneath the rear side ofthe carrier. The straws are carlaol ried around in the cage to a point. above opening 221, and are then permitted to d rop out of the carrier through the opening into a suitable container, not shown, beneath thel supporting bed 24. y l

It is tovbe understood that although the mechanism first described has the combined advantages of a carrier and heater, and preferably it will be utilized for both such purposes, its operation as a carrier is lindependent ofits function as a heater. In other words, should it be desirable to dispense with the heating operation, or to heat the straws subsequent to their being discharged from the carrier, the carrier may be used, as such, in the absence of provision for heating it. Therefore, we do not limit the invention to the use of a heated carrier, but prefer that it be regarded as optional Whether or not the carrier be heated.

We claim l. In a-tube forming machine,` means for continuously forming and advancing a tube,-

- means for intermittently cutting the formed tube into equal predetermined lengths, means for feeding stock to said tube forming means, and means for operatingsaid feed means in timed relation to the operation of saifd cutting means.

2. In a tube forming machine, means forl continuously forming and advancing a tube, means for intermittently cutting the formed tube into eqilal predetermined lengths, means for feeding stock to said tube forming means, and means for operating said feed means in timed relation to the operation of said cut- -ting means, said forming means tending tol advance the tube at a permitted by said stoc feeding means.

In a tube forming machine,means for continuously forming and advancing 'a tube, a cutter for intermittently severing the formed tu'be into equal lengths and adapted to travel with the tubeduring the cuttingJ severing operation, means for operating said cutter in timed relation Withsaid feed release, and means to cause the cutter and formed tube to travel at the same speed. l

5. In a tube forming machine, means for continuously winding and advancing a tube, means for feeding strip stock to saidy tube winding means' at a constant predetermined rate, said winding means tending to advance reater rate than thatv the tube at a greater rate than that permitted by the stock feeding means, and said winding means being adjustable to vary the pltch of the wound strips. v

6. In a tube forming machine, a mandrel, means for continuously forming a spirally wound tube on said mandrel andfor advancing the formed tube from the mandrel, means for feeding strip stock to said tube forming means at a constant predetermined rate, said forming means tending to advance the tube at a greater rate than that permitted by the stock feeding lneans, said winding means being adjustable to vary the pitch of the Wound strips, a cutter, andmeans fo'r operating said cutter in timed relation to said feed means. l

7. In a tube forming machine, a mandrel, means for continuously Winding a tube on said mandrel and for advancing the formed tube from the mandrel, a pair lof feed re-v ,of rollers ldisposed at opposite sides of said mandrel and adapted to Wind said strip stock on the mandrel to form the tube, said rollers being positioned voppositely angularly relative to the mandrel, and means for rotatably driving said rollers in opposite directions relative to the mandrel.

9. In a tube forming machine, a mandrel, means for continuously winding strip stock into a tubeon said mandrel and for advancing the formed tube from the mandrel, a disk cutter for intermittently severing the formed tube into equal predetermined lengths and adapted to travel with the tube during the.

cutting operation, means for releasing strip stock tosaidwinding means at a predetermined rate, said Winding means tending to advance the tube at a greater rate than 'that permitted by said stock releasing means, and meansfor operating said cutter and the stock releasing means in timed relation.

- l0. In a tube forming machine, a mandrel,

means for feeding strip stock to said mandrel and a pair of rollers disposed at opposlte sides of said mandrel and adapted to Wind said strip stock on the mandrel to form and advance the tube, a cutter' adapted to sever the formed tube into predetermined lengths, and means for operating said cutter 1n timed relation to said. stock feeding means in timed relation to cause the cutter t and tube to travel at the same rate.

means for feeding strip stock to said4 mandrel, and a pair of 'winding rollers rotatably mounted at opposite sides of "said mandrel and arranged oppositely angularly relative thereto, yand means for rotatably driving the strip engaging surfaces of said rollers in opposite directions relative to the mandrel,

said rollers being adaptedA to engage and jwind said strip stock on the mandrel and to rotate and advance the formed tube-thereon.

13. In a tube forming machine, a mandrel, means for feeding strip stock to said mandrel, and a pair of .winding rollers rotatably mounted at opposite sides of said mandreland arranged oppositely angularly relative thereto, and `means for rotatably drivingV the strip engaging surfaces of said rollers in opposite directions relative to the mandrel, said rollers being adapted to engage and wind said strip stock onthe mandrel and to rotate land advance the formed tube thereon, and said rollers having yieldable peripheral surfaces. 1

14.' In a tube forming machine, a mandrel, means for feeding strip stock to said mandrel, and a pair of winding rollers rotatably mounted at'opposite sides of said mandrel `and arranged oppositely angularly relative thereto, and means for rotatably driving the strip engaging surfaces of said rollers in opposite directions relation to the mandrel, said rollers being adapted to engage and wind said strip stock on the mandrel and to rotate and advance the formed tube thereon, and each of said rollers comprising a body mounted on a shaft and a removable rubber work engaging `ring .carried on said body.L

15. In a tube forming machine, a mandrel,

means for feeding strip stock to said mandrelhy a pair of winding rollers rotatably mounted at opposite sides of said mandrel and arranged oppositely 'angularly relative thereto,

and means vfor rotatably driving the strip engaging surfaces of said rollers in opposite directions relative. to the mandrel, said rollers being adapted to engage and wind'said strip stock on the mandrel and to vrotate and advance the formed tube thereon, and means for adjusting said rollers laterally of the mandrel.

16. In a tube formin machine, a mandrel, means for feeding strlp stock to said mandrel, a pairof winding members `mounted at opposite sides'ofsaid mandrel and arranged oppositely angularly relative thereto, said members being adapted to engage and wind said strip stock on Athe mandrel and having strip engaging surfaces movable angularl in opposite directions relative to the man rel, drive means for said members, and means for adjusting the positions of angularity of said surfaces with relation to the mandrel.

17. In a tube forming machine, a mandrel,

y means for feeding strip stock tosaid mandrel, 12. In a tube forming machine, a mandrel,

f i 18. In an automatic tube forming machine,

means for continuously lforming and advancing a tube, means for intermittently cutting the formed tube into equal predetermined lengths, means for feeding stock to said tube forming means in timed relation to the operation of said cutting means, and means for manually operatin and said stock feeingfmeans independently ofsaid cutting means.- y

19. In a tube forming machine, means for continuously forming and advancing a spiv strip stock to said tube forming means, sai formrally wound tube, means forvfeedin ing Ameans being adjustable to vary the pitch of the Wound strips, a cutter for intermit tently Severin the formed tube. into equal lengths and a apted to travel with the tube during the severing operation, and means for operating said cutter in timed relation with the operation of said stock feed means.

20. In a tube forming machine, means for continuously forming and advancing a tube, means for feeding stockto said tube forming means, a cutter for intermittently severing the formed tube into equal lengths and v adapted to travelvwiththe tube during the severing operation, and means for operating said cutter in timed relation with the operation of said stock feed means, the last mentioned means including cam actuated means for moving the cutter in the Adirection of movement of the tube, andv cam actuated means for moving the cutter laterally into 'and out of the path of movement o f the tube.

21. In a tube forming machine, means for continuously` forming and advancing a tube, means for feeding stock to said tube forming means, cutter means for severing the formed tube into equal lengths and comprising aldisk cutter and avslde rest'mounting said tube forming means for said cutter, and cam means for actuating said slide rest, operated intimed relation with the .operation of said stock feed means.

22. In a tube forming-machine, means for continuously forming and advancing a tube, means for feeding stock to said tube forming means, cutting means for severing the formed tube into equal lengths and comprising a disk cutter and a compound slide rest mounting for said cutter, said mounting embodying a supporting member slidable longitudinally of the path of movement of the tube and a second supporting member slidable laterally of said path, and means for operating said supporting members in timed relation to said Astock feeding means.

23. In a tube forming machine, means for continuously forming and advancing a tube,

means for feeding stock to said tube forming means, cutting means for severing the formed tube into equal lengths and comprising aldisk cutterand a slide rest mounting for said cutter, said mounting embodying a supporting member slidable longitudinally of the path of movement of the tube and a second supporting member slidable laterally of said path, yielding means resisting movement of said supporting members in .one direction of their respective travels, and cam means for operating said members in timed relation to said-stock feeding means.

24. In a tube forming machine, the combination comprising, means for continuously forming and advancing a tube,N a cutter mechanism adapted to intermittently sever the formed tube into equal lengths during its advancing movement, and a heated carrier adapted to receive a severed tube direct from said cutter mechanism and to move said severed tube out of the path of the advancing subsequent tube.

25. In a 'tube lforming machine, the com-V bination comprising, means for continuously forming and advancing a tube, a cutter mechanism `adapted to intermittently sever the formed tube into equal lengths during its advancing movement, a carrier adapted to receive a severed tube direct from said cutter mechanism and to move said severed tube out of the path of the advancing subsequent tube, and means associated With said carrier for heating the tubes received thereby for a pre'- determ'ined period of time.

26. In a tube forming machine,ithe combination comprising, means Jfor continuously forming and advancing a tube, a cutter mechanism adapted to intermittently sever the formed tube during its advancing movement, a carrier adapted to receive a severed tube direct from said cutter mechanism and to move said severed tube out of the path of the advancing subsequent tube, and means for advancing said severed tube to the carrier at a rate in excess of the speed of movement of the advancing subsequent tube.

27. In a tube., forming machine, the combination comprising, means for continuously forming land advancing a tube, a cutter mechanism adapted to intermittently sever the formed tube during its advancing move-l ment, 'a carrier adapted to receive a severed tube direct from said cutter mechanism and to move said severed tube out of theJ` path of the advancing subsequent tube, and intermittently operable means for advancing said severed tube to the carrier at a rate in excess pfbthe speed of movement of the subsequent 28. In a tube forming machine, the combination comprising, means for continuously forming and advancing a tube, a cutter mechanism adapted to intermittently sever the formed tube into equal lengths during its advancing movement, an intermittently operated carrier adapted to receive a s vered tube direct from said cutter mechani and to move said severed tube out of the path of the advancing subsequent tube, and means for advancing said severed tube to the carrier at a rate in excess of the speed of movement of said advancing subsequent tube.

29. In a tube forming machine, the-combination comprising, l means forcontinuously forming and advancing a tube, a cutter mechanism adapted to intermittently sever the formed tube into equal lengths during its advancing movement, van intermittently operated carrier adapted to receive a severed tube direct from said cutter mechanism and to move said severed tube out of the path of the advancingsubsequent tube, and intermittently operable means for advancing said severed tube to the carrier at arate in excess of the speed of movement of said advancing subsequent tube.

30. In a tube forming machine, the combination comprising, means for continuously forming and advancing a tube, a cutter mechanism adapted to intermittently sever the formed tube into equal lengths during its advancmg movement, a carrier intermittent-- ly operated in timed relation with the operation of said cutter and adapted to receive a severed tube direct from said cutter mechanism and to move said severed tube out of the path of the advancing subsequent tube, and means operated in timed relation with said cutter for advancing said severed tube to the carrier at a rate in excess of the speed ofbmovement of said advancing subsequent tu e.

31. In a tube forming machine, the combination comprising, means for continuously forming and advancing a tube, a cutter mechanism adapted to intermittently sever the formed tube during its advancing movement,

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2723605 *Aug 19, 1950Nov 15, 1955Stahl William FApparatus for making laminated tubes
US2931278 *Jul 12, 1957Apr 5, 1960Ignell Rolf LMethod and apparatus for the continuous production of drinking straws and the like
US3044372 *Jan 28, 1959Jul 17, 1962M D Knowlton CoMachine and method for making helically wound tubing
US3195428 *Jan 31, 1963Jul 20, 1965Tetra Pak AbMethod for reducing sliding friction
US6991682Jul 17, 2003Jan 31, 2006Paper Converting Machine CompanyApplicator plate for an adhesive applicator of a core-making machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification493/273, 493/288, 493/298, 83/318, 493/299, 493/274
International ClassificationB26D1/60, B26D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB26D1/60
European ClassificationB26D1/60