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Publication numberUS1915757 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 27, 1933
Filing dateDec 15, 1930
Priority dateDec 15, 1930
Publication numberUS 1915757 A, US 1915757A, US-A-1915757, US1915757 A, US1915757A
InventorsPierce Raymond C
Original AssigneeGen American Tank Car Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Car
US 1915757 A
Images(5)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 27, 1933.

R. c. PIERCE CAR 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 3M m r w w m) NW NW w z: 1 a, Q 1% W m H M W a M. .m N Wm WM M. N NH. M W k nw. QW W QM W m \wawi wh W 1 NR June 27, 1933.

R. C. PIERCE 5 Sheets- Sheet 2 jzveza an Original Filed D50. 15, 1930 jqymzzdffz'erc 'e.

June 27, 1932.. I R E 1,915,757

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0ri'gin.1 Filed Bat. 15, 1930 5 Sheets-Sheet a R. C. PIERCE June 27, 1933.

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Original Filed Dec. 15, 1930 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 g bwm zw za-z. v

Patented June e UNITED sTA r OFFICE- RAYIvIoNn o. PIERCE, or cnIeAed'ILEINoie, ssmNoR '10 GENERAL AMERICAN TA K CAR ooRroa rIoN, or' cmcaeo, ILLINoIaa conroRA'rIoN or WEST VIRGINIA Application filed December .15, 1830,.8er1a1 No. 502,585. Renewed November 26, 1932.

My invention relates more particularlyto lar line '5 on Fig. 1 and viewed in the direccars for transporting in bulk relativel fine tion of-the arrow. j material such as for examplepulverize coal, Figure 6 is a broken enlarged sectional cement, soda ash, pulverizedclay, flour, sulview of the suction-nozzle referred to, the r fur, grains and seeds. section being taken at the line 6 on Fig. 7 and According to prior practice the common viewed in the direction of the arrow. procedure is to load such material into sacks, Figure 7 is a broken section taken at the bXes,-0r barrels weighing usuallyfrom fifty line 7 on Fig. 4 and the line 7-7 on Fig. 2 and pounds to four hundred pounds each- Sand viewed in the direction of the respective arlii in such packaged condition t ucked into the rows.

cars in which the material is to beshi'pped, Figure 8 is a view like Fig. 7 of a modificaand in some instances the material has been tion of the structure of the preceding figures.- loaded in bulk into paper lined boxfcars. Figure v9 is a section taken at the lrregular The shipping of such material either in line 9-9'on Fig. 8 and viewed in the direction I45 packaged condition or in bulk in box cars as of the arrows.

stated involves relatively great expense in v Figure 10 is an enlarged section taken at the loading and unloading of the cars due the irregular line 10- 10 on Fig. 8 and viewed to the high cost of labor required and in the in thedirection of the arrows. case of packaged material the additional ex- Figurell is a view in longitudinal ectionpense for the-packages. a1 elevation of one of the similar ends of a One of my objects is to provide for the 4 car constituting another embodimentof the more expeditious d economical t ansport invention as to certain features of the latter; tion of ladings of the character above re; and ferred to. Figure 12, a section taken at the line 12 on Another O jec i tOPI V BM V i p Fig. Y11 and viewed'in the direction of the and relatively inexpensive construction of rrow,

car suitable for the transportation of such Referring to the construction of car shown ladings. in Figs. .1 to 7 ,inclusive, 13 represents the un- An h li bj i t m i the amount derframe of th'ecar which may be of any deof labor required in the loading of such masirable construction that shown being of the terial into cars and the unloading thereof; common center sill type comprising, generaland Other 0b1e0ts W111 be manlfestfrom the stated a center upported H following descrlptlon. at its ends on bolsters which in turn are Referring th accompanying draw supported on trucks in accordance with comf 1n A mon practice the" wheels of whichare reprelgure 1 1s w partly 1n side elevation Sented at v A and partly'im" ltudmalf i t The car also comprises a cylindrical tank lway i utmg'o'ne 0 t 18 em 0 represented'at 17 supported on its side on the of my invention. v A

4 Figur'e2 'i s'a plangsectional view taken at the line 2-.5-2of 1 and viewed in the direction of the arrows Figure 3- is an enlarged plan sectional viewio'f thegui'de for the nozzle of a suction monly p lde underframe, the tank-17 being constructed of sheet metal in accordance with the common practice of manufacturing tank cars as combols ters 15 and extending lengthwise of the i conveyor for 'U.se in unloading the car, The tank 17 may be held on the underframe I Figure 4 is a enlarged cross sectional view against shifting thereon in any desirable manofthe oar taken at the line 4 on Fig. 1 and ner as for example byanchors 18 shown as vie ed iii-the direction of the arrow. located adjacent the mlddlg ofthe tank, the :Figuire 5 is' a broken fragmentary plan ends of which latter are freetosllde on the sectional view of the-car takenlat the irregubolsters l5 and are engaged bands 19 anchored to the underframe and extending over the tank at its opposite ends.

The top of the tank 17 adjacent its center and also to one side thereof is provided with manholes 20 and 21 equipped with removable closures 22 and 23, respectively, of any suitable construction. At intervals along the top of the tank loading-hatches 24 are provided each of which is equipped with a removable closure such as that represented at 25 of one of the hatches.

Located inside the tank 17 and extending lengthwise thereof throughout its length at opposite sides of its median line are slope sheets 26 which inclineupwardly and outwardly from the median line of the tank as shown, the lower edges of these sheets forming, in combination with upwardly converging plates 27 at the median line of the car, hopper shaped troughs 28; the slope sheets26 being preferably backed at intervals along their length by angle plates 29 secured thereto by the rivets 30 and bearing against the inner surface of the tank l7, for the purpose of preventing the deforming of the sheets 26 by the weight of the lading imposed thereon as hereinafter described; and theplates 27 extending from the ends of the tank to points short of the vertical plane in which-the manhole 22 extends, as represented in Figs. 1, 2 and 7. f

The tank 17 which is thus constructedto present a bottom of general hopper form, is provided with conveyors shown as of the screw type for moving the lading of fine material loaded into the tank as hereinafter described, from opposite ends of the tank to a point midway between its ends and in vertical alinement with the manhole 20.

In the construction shown one set of screw conveyors comprising a right and left-hand .screw is located in each trough 28, the screws of each set thereof being represented at 31 and 32 and secured to a shaft 33 extending lengthwise of the car and journalled in bearings'34 and 35. The bearings 35 are secured, as by the rivets 36, to one of the end walls of the tank 17 which latter is preferably apertured, as represented at 37, to permit of the expeditious installing of the screw conveyors in the tank and their removal therefrom, if desired.

The two shafts 33 are connected together by a sprocket-drive comprising a chain 38 engaging sprockets 39 on the shafts 33 which drives these shafts in the same direction so that the screw elements on these shafts operate'to convey the lading from opposite ends as above stated.

Inasmuch as the lading is superposed on the screw conveyors it is desirable that these conveyors be relieved of at least a portion of the dead weight of the lading and to this end the tank 17 is preferably provided at intervals with members 40 having upwardly of the car to a point midwaybetween its ends gearing represented generally at 42, with one of the shafts 33, the inlet of the motor 41 being represented at 43 and its outlet at 43 In the case of the car now being described, it is contemplated that the unloading thereof be effected by means of suction conveyor apparatus or pressure-conveyor apparatus installed at the place where the car is to be unloaded. The conveyor apparatus shown is of a common form of the suction type which as commonly provided comprises a suctionnoz'zle represented at 44 and carried on the lower end of a pipe 45 through which the suction is exerted to convey through the pipe 45 to a point of discharge the material in which the nozzle 44 is partially submerged.

outwardly inclined as represented at 48 and connected with the tank as for example by the rivets shown at 49, bands 50 surrounding the rods 47 and secured thereto serving to hold the latter in the desired spaced relation. The nozzle 44 is movable up and down I between these rods grouped as stated the point to which it may be lowered being determined by any suitable stop means as for example those shown and comprising a strap member 51 embracing the guide rods 47 adjacent their lower ends and extending into the path of downward movement of the nozzle 44.

As will be unders ood from the foregoing description the lading to be charged into the tank 17 may be introduced therein through any one-or all of the above described openings in the top of the tank either by spouting it into the tank or otherwise discharging it into the tank.

In the unloading of the car the suction-nozzle 44 is introduced through the manhole 20 into the material in the tank which, under the operation of the suction apparatus, is withisposed in a triscribed are set into operation and operate toeifect a continuous feed of the'material froniop'posite ends of the car to the center thereof where it may be operated on by the suction apparatus to discharge it from the car it being undersiood that by constructing the car as shown the lading is steadily moved from the end portions of the car io an unloading point where the material is subjected to the suction apparatus for removing it from the car. i

The suction action produced in the pipe and exerted against the lading in the unloading operation may be augmented as by supplying air pressure to the interior of the tank at the top' thereof through a pipe 17 leading from any suitable source of air under pressure and opening at 17 b into the tank 17. or by leading the exhaust air from the airmotor 41 through the pipe 43 into the top of the tank, or by a combination thereof; the pipe 17 also communicating with pipes 17 which open into the spaces between the slope sheets 26, and the side wall of the tank 17 for equalizing the air pressure on opposite sides of the slope sheets.

Furthermore, if desired, the unloading of the tank may be effected through the conveyor pipe 45 by air pressure, instead of suction, introduced into the tank and exerted against the lading, as for example through the pipe 17 aided, if desired, by the exhaust air pressure from the motor 41 entering the tank through the pipe 43 It is also contemplatedthat, if desired, the unloading of the car may be effected by discharge through a lower outlet in the tank 17 preferably with the aid of compressed air. As illustrative of a construction by which such. discharge of the material may be effected, reference is made to the construction shown in Figs. 8, 9 and 10 of the drawings which illustrate a car which may be unloaded either by suction conveyor mechanism as described of the car of the preceding figures, or by gravity discharge aided by air pressure.

' he car of Figs. 8, 9 and 10 is of the same construction as that shown in Figs. 1 to 7,

inclusive, except for the addition of a discharge opening 52 in the bottom of the tank 1'? midway between its ends and controlled by cosure mechanism represented generally at 5 iihe closur'e means 53 above referred to are shownas comprising a plate 54, forming a gate, slidably mounted in guides 55 for movement into and out of a position for preventing the discharge of the material through the outlet 52, the gate 54 being shown as pivotally connected at one end 56 with a link 57 pivoted at 58 to a reciprocablysupported rack 59 actuated by means of a pinion 60 secured to a shaft-61 suitably journalled on the underframe of the car and extending at one end into a position in which it is accessible for operation as for example by a crank handle 62 thereon.

The means for supplying air p-ressure'to the interior of the tank for forcing the lading therefrom through the outlet 52 comprise the pipe 17, which may be supplemented if desired by the exhaust air pressure supplied to the tank from the air motor 41 through the pipe 43.

It will be understood from the foregoing description that the lading in the particular construction just described may be removed either by means of the suction or pressure conveyor mechanism introduced into the tank 17 through the manhole 20 in which case the outlet 52 would be closed, or by gravity, aided by air pressure, in which latter case the outlet 52 would be open and the compressed air introduced into the interior of the tank above the lading would operate to forcibly drive the material through the outlet 52 to which it is steadily moved by the action of theconveyors.

Referring now to the construction of car shown in Figs. ll'and 12, it comprises an underframe indicated generally at 66 and corresponding with the underfranic of the constriu-tion of Figs. 1 to 7, inclusive. the underfranie having superposed thereon a cylindrical tank 67 one end only of which is shown in Fig. 11, the other end thereof being of similar construction..

The tank 67 contains slope sheets 68 which extend crosswise of the tank and converge downwardly to an outlet (59 at the bottom of the tank this outlet being shown as provided with valve mechanism represented at 70 forming a removable closure for the outlet. Other downwardly con erging slope sheets 71 are positioned in the tank these slope sheets. extending lengthwise of the tank and from one to the other of the. slope sheets (38 and tern'iinating adjacent the outlet 69 whereby this part of the tank 67 is caused to present a compartment 7 2 of general hopper form, in vert' .al alinement with the outlet 69, to which the fine material to be carried therein is supplied in any suitable way through an opeiing 72 in the top of the tank 67 preferably in vertical alinement withthe outlet 69. Of course, it will be understood that in the particular construction now being described the hopper construction 72 is provided at each end of the tank.

it being further understood that if desired the number of the hopper-compartments 72 may be varied.

In the case 'of the construction just described it is desirable where the lading is of such'chara-cter that it tends to pack and which might cause arching thereof over the outlet 69 preventing discharge of the material therethrough, means be. provided for loosening the material. In the construction shown compressed air is used for this purpose, the air being supplied to the lower portion of the hopper compartment 72 through openings 74: in the slope sheets 71., these openings communicating with pipes 75 leading from any suitable source of air under pressure.

While I have illustrated and described certain constructions embodying features of my invention, I do not wish to be understood as intending to limit it thereto as the same may be variously modified and altered and the invention embodied in other forms of structure without departing from the spirit of my invention.

What I claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is:

1. A car comprising a substantially cylindrical tank supported on its side and having an opening between its ends through which the material may be removed, and slope sheets in said tank extending from the sides of the tank in downwardly converging relation and forming a hopper compartment therein substantially vertically alined with said opening.

2. A car comprising a substantially cylindrical tank supported on its side and having a closure-contr0lled outlet in its bottom between its ends, and slope sheets in said tank inclining upwardly and outwardly away from said outlet and extending to the sides of the tank.

3. A car comprising a substantially cylindrical tank supported on its side and having a closure-controlled outlet in its bottom between its ends, and slope sheets in said tank inclining upwardly and outwardly away from said outlet and extending to the sides of the tank, certain of said sheets extending lengthwise of said tank and others of said sheets crosswise thereof.

4. A car comprising a substantially cylindrical tank supported on its side and having an opening midway between its ends through which the material may be removed, slopesheets in said tank extending lengthwise thereof at its opposite sides and upwardly diverging, said slope sheets being spaced apart at their lower ends, members extending lengthwise of the tank and located be tween said slope sheets adjacent the bottom of said tank and forming with said slope sheets troughs at opposite sides of the median line of said tank and screw conveyors in said troughs for moving the lading from opposite ends of the tank toward the center thereof.

5. A car for transporting lading having a container portion in which the lading is carried and provided with an opening in its top, said container portion having a substantially horizontal bottom, a conveyor pipe extending downwardly through said opening into said container portion and laterally immovh, eanna? able, and means in said'container portion adjacent the bottom thereof for conveying the lading in said container portion to said conveyor pipe.

6. A car for transporting lading having a container portion in which the lading is carried and provided with an opening in its top, said container portion having a substantially horizontal bottom, vertical pipeconveyor guide-means in said container portion in line with said opening, and means in said container portion adjacent the bottom thereof for conveying the lading in said container portion to a conveyor pipe positioned by said guide means.

7. A car for transporting lading having a container portion in which the lading is carried and provided with an opening in its top, said container portion having a substantially horizontal bottom, vertical pipe-conveyor guide-means in said container portion in line with said opening, and a stop for preventing the seating of said pipe on the bottom of said container portion. a

8. A car comprising an underframe, a substantially cylindrical tank supported on its side on said underframe and extending wholly beyond said underframe and having an opening midway between its ends through tank andforming with said slope sheets troughs at opposite sides of the median line of said, tank and conveyor means in said troughs for moving the lading from opposite ends of the tank toward the center thereof.

9. A car comprising'a substantially cylindrical tank supported on its side and having an opening midway between its ends through which the material nfay be removed, slopesheets in said tank extending lengthwise thereof at its opposite sides and upwardly diverging, said slope sheets being spaced apart at their lower ends, members extending lengthwise of the tank and located between said slope sheets adjacent the bottom of said tank and forming with said slope sheets troughs at opposite sides of the median line of' said tank and conveyor means in said troughs for moving the lading from opposite ends of the tank toward the center thereof.

10. A car comprising a substantially cylindrical tank supported on its side and containing an outlet, and slope sheets in said tank extending lengthwise thereof at opposite sides of the median line of the tank said sheets extending from the sides of the tank in downwardly converging relation.

RAYMOND C. PIERCE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2464183 *Jul 30, 1943Mar 8, 1949Nat Fitch CorpPneumatically unloadable shipping container
US2691455 *Apr 8, 1949Oct 12, 1954Babcock & Wilcox CoLocomotive tender with material handling equipment
US2796185 *Feb 8, 1955Jun 18, 1957Fruehauf Trailer CoMaterial handling system for tanktype vehicles
US2988235 *Dec 4, 1957Jun 13, 1961Koehring CoPortable batching apparatus
US3139286 *Nov 13, 1961Jun 30, 1964Johnson Ronald DTank truck hopper body formed with arcuate surfaces
US3252431 *Mar 30, 1964May 24, 1966Union Tank Car CoRailroad hopper-type tank car
US3659747 *Mar 4, 1970May 2, 1972Teichgraeber James AAutomatic feeder
US4286916 *Jul 17, 1979Sep 1, 1981Evans Gerald PPower operated mechanisms for actuating swinging arms
US5275487 *Sep 4, 1992Jan 4, 1994The Maitland Company, Inc.Hazardous waste transportation and disposal
US5340213 *Dec 30, 1993Aug 23, 1994Sumter Transport, Inc.Agitation system
US5385402 *Aug 23, 1994Jan 31, 1995Sumter Transport, Inc.Hazardous waste transportation and disposal
US5489152 *Sep 15, 1992Feb 6, 1996The Maitland CompanyHazardous waste transportation and disposal
US5626423 *Jan 30, 1995May 6, 1997The Maitland CompanyApparatus and method for transporting and agitating a substance
US5851068 *May 2, 1997Dec 22, 1998The Maitland Co.Intermodal transportation of sedimentary substances
US6333446Apr 20, 1993Dec 25, 2001The Maitland Company, Inc.Hazardous waste transportation and disposal
US6375222 *Jan 24, 2000Apr 23, 2002Wade Services, Inc.Mobile storage tank having a double wall construction
US6557896 *Oct 30, 2000May 6, 2003Allan William StobartRoad and rail tankers
US6641297Nov 5, 2001Nov 4, 2003Robert M. RumphHazardous waste transportation and disposal
US6793250Mar 17, 2003Sep 21, 2004Allan William StobartRoad and rail tankers
US7108285May 4, 2004Sep 19, 2006Allan William StobartRoad and rail tankers
US8474892Jun 13, 2012Jul 2, 2013Pinnacle Companies, Inc.Lifting apparatus and method
US8534480Jun 13, 2012Sep 17, 2013Pinnacle Companies, Inc.Tank segment connection apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification414/526, 280/839, 105/358
International ClassificationB61D5/00
Cooperative ClassificationB61D5/004
European ClassificationB61D5/00B2