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Publication numberUS1915805 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 27, 1933
Filing dateJun 5, 1930
Priority dateJun 5, 1930
Publication numberUS 1915805 A, US 1915805A, US-A-1915805, US1915805 A, US1915805A
InventorsSutcliffe Arthur G
Original AssigneeIlg Electric Ventilating Compa
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Radiator
US 1915805 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 27, 1933. A 5 SUTCLIFF'E 1,915,805

RADIATOR Filed June 5, 1950 Patented June 27, 1933 ARTHUR e.

SUTGLIFFE, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, ASSIGNOR TO ILG ELECTRIC VENTILAT- ING COMPANY, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, A CORPORATION OF LOUISIANA 1 RADIATOR Application filed June 5,

radiator, and, therefore, when air passes over I a radiator at a high velocity it increases the efficiency of the heating surfaces. Blast heating radiators of this type are quite extensively used for the heating of factories, work shops, and in other similar situations. Howi ever, the novel features of the present inven- 29 tion hereinafter described are not limited to their use in a blast heating radiator, but may usefully be employed in radiators of other types. i e The present invention is embodied in a radiator comprising a plurality of tubes, and duplicate endwise reversed upper and lower longitudinally tapered headers into which the ends of said tubes are connected. These radiators are frequently mounted quite close to a wall, floor or ceiling of the room; and the invention provides means by which the steam supply and exhaust pipes may be led into the radiator headers from different directions as the circumstances of each installation may require.

The invention, its novel structural features, and the benefits and advantages attending the same will all be readily understood by' persons skilled in the art from the following description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which I have illustrated a simple and practical embodiment of the invention, and wherein- Fig. 1 is a side elevation of the complete radiator unit. r

Fig. 2 is an enlarged vertical longitudinal section, broken out, through the upper portion of the radiator.

Fig; 3 is a vertical transverse section taken on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2.

1930. Sam 110359303.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary plan View of one of the punched radiator fin strips.

Referring to, the drawing, 10 designates the upper hollow header of the radiator and 10 the lower hollow head, these parts being structural duplicates relatively inverted both vertically and horizontally as will be apparent from Fig. 1. 11 and 11 designate the upper and lower headerplates, and 12 designates-each of'one or more rows oftubes, p-refi erably of copper,the upper and lower ends of which are tightly fitted into holes in the upper and lower header plates. 13 designates each of a group of closely associated fins that are mounted on the tubes 12.

Each of the headers 10 and 10 is a hollow casting preferably of the longitudinally tapered form shown in Fig. 1 and formed with a marginal flange 14 that seats on the marginal portion of the header plate, with an interposed gasket 15 to insure a steam tight 3o1nt,and isattached to the header plate by screws 16. Each hollow header is provided with avertical threaded opening 17 at the high end of its top wall, and a similar horizontal threaded opening 18 of the same dianieter as opening 17 in the high vertical end Wall thereof. This construction provides a double entrance header, whereby steam may be allowed to flow in from either a vertical or .a horizontal pipe, and similarly exhaust from the lower header'lO. This allows the heating surface to be put close to a wall, floor or ceiling, depending upon which position is most desirable or convenient, If the unit is mounted close to the ceiling, the top opening 17 is closed by means of a plug 19, and a steam connection is then made by screwing the steam supplypipe 20 into the opening 18 in the end wall. If, on the other hand, it is m'ore'desirable or convenient to mount either or both ends of the unit close to a wall, the opening or openings 18 are closed by the plug 19, and the steam pipe is screwed into the vertical opening 17 As above stated, the radiator tubes 12are pressed tightly into holes in the header plates 11 and 11; and into the ends of the tubes are forced internal orificebushings 21, preferably countersunk or internally flared at their outer ends as shown at 21, to reduce resistance to the flow of steam, which bushings aid in sealing the joints of the tubes in the header plates against leakage through expansion and contraction, and also increase the frictional grip of the tubes on the plates.

On the tubes 12 are mounted in closely spaced relation a group of radiator fins, each consisting of a sheet metal strip 13, a fragment of which is shown in plan View in Fig. 4. Through this strip are punched holes 22 each of a diameter slightly less than the external 7 diameter of the tubes, and these plates are described structure is symmetrical throughout and can be assembled either end up, with the horizontal pipe leads, when used, entering from either the right or the left, as may be most convenient. The double entrance header feature, especially when combined with endwise reversible upper and lower headers, thus well adapts the structure to situations where the supply and exhaust steam pipes are most conveniently led in from above and below or from either end.

I claim:

A radiator comprising a plurality of tubes, and duplicate endwise reversed upper and lower longitudinally tapered headers into which the ends of said tubes are connected, said upper header being formed with a vertical opening in its top wall and a horizontal opening in its high end wall for optional connection thereto of a. flow pipe, and said lower header being formed with a vertical opening in its bottom wall and a'horizontal opening in its high end wall for optional connection thereto of a flow pipe.

ARTHUR G. SUTCLIFFE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2491576 *Aug 11, 1945Dec 20, 1949Thermal Liquids IncLiquid heating system
US2556632 *Aug 5, 1948Jun 12, 1951Powell William LRadiator
US2735698 *Aug 1, 1952Feb 21, 1956 Header plate-tube joint for heat-
US3073575 *Sep 5, 1957Jan 15, 1963Gea Luftkuhler Ges M B HAir-cooled surface condenser
US3270807 *May 1, 1964Sep 6, 1966Paul E SteadmanHeat exchanger having distribution tube internal flow directors
US4093024 *Jun 15, 1976Jun 6, 1978Olin CorporationHeat exchanger exhibiting improved fluid distribution
US4109711 *Nov 17, 1975Aug 29, 1978Olin CorporationHeat exchange panel
US6802364Sep 25, 2000Oct 12, 2004Iowa State University Research Foundation, Inc.Method and means for miniaturization of binary-fluid heat and mass exchangers
US7066241Jul 19, 2004Jun 27, 2006Iowa State Research FoundationMethod and means for miniaturization of binary-fluid heat and mass exchangers
US7896065 *Sep 30, 2004Mar 1, 2011Behr Gmbh & Co. KgCharge-air cooler for motor vehicles
US8033326Dec 20, 2007Oct 11, 2011Caterpillar Inc.Heat exchanger
US9383042 *Mar 29, 2013Jul 5, 2016Hanon SystemsTank and spout interface for heat exchanger and its manufacturing
US20050006064 *Jul 19, 2004Jan 13, 2005Iowa State University Research Foundation, Inc.Method and means for miniaturization of binary-fluid heat and mass exchangers
US20060215365 *Mar 10, 2006Sep 28, 2006Cooler Master Co., Ltd.Monitor heat dissipator
US20070114013 *Sep 30, 2004May 24, 2007Behr Gmbh & Co. KgCharge-air cooler for motor vehicles
US20070235174 *Dec 20, 2006Oct 11, 2007Dakhoul Youssef MHeat exchanger
US20070261836 *Jun 1, 2005Nov 15, 2007Behr Gmbh & Co.. KgHeat Exchanger with an All-Metal Construction, in Particular an All-Aluminium Construction
US20080149318 *Dec 20, 2007Jun 26, 2008Caterpillar IncHeat exchanger
US20130257040 *Mar 29, 2013Oct 3, 2013Visteon Global Technologies, Inc.Tank and spout interface for heat exchanger and its manufacturing
US20140202660 *Jan 16, 2014Jul 24, 2014Robert D. SeligmanCooling system and a method for its use
US20140202672 *Jan 22, 2013Jul 24, 2014Visteon Global Technologies, Inc.Heat exchanger manifold improvements for transient start-up
Classifications
U.S. Classification165/137, 165/146, 29/890.47, 165/151, 165/174, 237/68
International ClassificationF28D1/04, F28D1/053
Cooperative ClassificationF28D1/05333
European ClassificationF28D1/053C6