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Publication numberUS1918519 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 18, 1933
Filing dateJul 16, 1930
Priority dateJul 16, 1930
Publication numberUS 1918519 A, US 1918519A, US-A-1918519, US1918519 A, US1918519A
InventorsWilliam J Clements
Original AssigneeClements Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vacuum cleaner
US 1918519 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 3- w. J. CLEMENTS VACUUM CLEANER Filed July 16, 1930 2 Sheets- Sheet 1 i E M 66 a w n. w 0 I 4 a & ll: 6

July 18, 1933.

w. J. cLEMENT's 1,918,519

VACUUM CLEANER Filed July 16, 1930 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented July 18, 1933 UNITED; STATES PATENT OFFICE WILLIAM J CLEMENTS, OF RIVER FOREST, ILLINOIS, ASSIGNOR '10 CLEMENTS MFG. (30., OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, A CORPORATION OF ILLINOIS VACUUM CLEANER Application filed July 16,

. claims.

I illustrate my invention more or less diagrammatically in the accompanying drawings, wherein-- Figure 1 is a side elevation;

Figure 2 is a detail of the handle;

Figure 3 is a section on the line 33 of Figure 2;

Figure 4 is a section on the line l& of Figure 3;

Figure 5 is a section similar to Figure 3 with parts in different positions;

Figure 6 is a section on the line '6-6 of Figure 1;

Figure 7 is a section on the line of Figure 6;

Figure 8 is a side elevation of the structure shown in Figure 6;

Figure 9 is a view similar to Figure 8 with parts in a different position;

Figure 10 is a similar view with the parts in a still different position;

Figure 11 is a section on the line 1111 of Figure 6; and

Figure 12 is a detail.

Like parts are indicated by like symbols throughout the specification and drawings.

Referring to the drawings, A generally indicates a vacuum cleaner structure which includes a motor housing A and a fan chamber A Since the motor and fan do not of themselves form any part of the present invention, motor and fan are not indicated in detail. A indicates a conductive connection for the motor which may be plugged in as by the plug A into the switch box A, A indicating a switch whereby the current may be turned on 1930. Serial No. 468,312.

and off. A is a forward extension of the fan chamber, which may be removable therefrom and which may include the downwardly extending and laterally expanded inlet and brush containing nozzle A rotatable within which is any suitable brush A", which may be driven by the belt A. from the motor rotated spindle A.

The motor is supported for example upon a pair of wheels B mounted on or beneath the fan casing. A pair of wheels 13 are rotatably positioned within the nozzle A. B "indicates a rear wheel for supporting the opposite end of the motor housing. It may be mounted upon the lever B adjustable as by the thumb screw B, whereby the vacuum cleaner as a Whole may be rotated about the wheels B, to raise or lower the height of the nozzle A The supplemental wheels B within the nozzle serve to limit the downward movement of the nozzle toward the floor and to prevent its being positioned in such close proximity to the floor as would prevent proper suction. In the position in which the parts are shown in Figure 1 the cleaner has in effect a five point support. Tilting the lever B in one direction or the other may lift the rollersB 1 or the rollers B from the floor, but it cannot be effective to thrust the lower edge of the nozzle A lower than the position in which it is shown in Figure 1. y

D generally indicates a handle structure which includes a lower handle portion 1), V

whichmay be of metal and formed inone piece; It terminates in the lower fork D rotatable upon the pin D which is shown in detail in Figure 12 and is shown as having aknurled head D and a spring D which prevents unintended axial movement of the pin. Mounted on the interior of the fork D is a lug D which is adapted to be engaged by the fork D of the lever DTwhich is rotatably mounted on the bushing D which surrounds the pin 1') and is fixed in relation to the housing D Coiled about the bushing D is the coil spring D one end of which abuts against the interior of the housing wall, as shown in Figure 11, the other end of which engages a pin or lug D upon the lever D The spring normally tends to move the lever D? in clockwise position as shown in Figures 8 to 11, thus tending to throw the lever into the position in which it is shown in dotted line in Figure 8 or the full line in Figure 11. T husthe effeet of the spring, and the lever D, is to move the fork D into upright position, thus maintaining the handle in the positionv in which it is'shown in Figure 1. moves in a slot D in the housing D, the slot being proportioned to serve as a limit to limit the forward or rearward movement of the lever D. At one limit the handle is in the full line position of Figure 8 and at the other limit it may take the dotted line position of Figure 8.

Positioned in the housing D is a sliding pin E which may slide in the interior bearT ing E and in the exterior bearing E formed,

in the wall of the housing. Movement may be controlled as by the upwardly projecting handle or stop member E which passes through a slot E in the housing top. Note that said slot is centrally offset as at E the spring E tending 'to hold the member E in said offset portion, and also frictionally to prevent movement of the member E and the pin in any setting. When the member E is in the position in which it is shown in Figures 6 and 7 the lever l) and the handle are freely movable. When the member E? is in intermediate position in the offset E the end of the pin E projects outwardly through the aperture E a suflicient distance to engage the fork D as shown in Figure 10 to limit the downward movement of the fork to the full line position of Figure 10. Otherwise the movement of the fork or handle is not controlled or impeded; When the member E is moved farther, to the right i hand end of. the slot E referring to its position in Figure 7, then the end of the pin E projects outwardly so far through the aperture E that it can penetrate the aperture E of the-\ofi'set portion or lug E of the fork D, at that time effecting a positive locking function and preventing any move-, ment of the fork D? or the handle. The parts are shown in this locking position in Figure 9,

As shown in Figure 1 thelower handle portion D extends upwardly a substantial distance from the fork D Mounted in the upper end thereof is a spring leaf G fixed at one end as at G, the free end being aligned with anaperture G Adjacent such aperturea cam member G is pivoted and is provided with a manual or finger controlled handle G. (it indicates an upper handle member cut away as at G to provide a flat face opposed to the spring G. This flatface G .is of substantial length. to permit a substantially longitudinal adjustment of the v handle. The operator may clamp the cam. (Si by. use of the member G at any position The lever I ing adapted to serve as limit means for limalong the flat portion G thus adjusting the handle as to height.

It will be realized that whereas I have described and shown a practical and operative device, nevertheless many changes might n be made in the size, shape, number and disposition of parts withoutdeparting from the V spirit of my invention. I therefore wish my description and drawings to be taken as in a broad sense illustrative and diagrammatic rather than as limiting me to my specific showing.

The use and operation of my invention are as follows: Y

Referring to the structure shown in de- 8( tail in Figures 6 to .12 I employ a ready looking means, including the pin E, which has three positions or adjustments. At one adjustment, as shown in Figure 7, it has no effect whatsoever upon the movement of the handle, which-may be swung freely by the operator in employing the device. The pressure of the spring D on the lever D normally holds the handle in upright position,

but its pressure is insufficient to hamper the ac operator in depressing the handle. When the pin E is in intermediate position, with the member E engaging the offset E of the slot E then the projecting end of the pin limits the downward movement of the han- 9. dle. The purpose of-this is to permit the operator readily to tilt the vacuum cleaner as when lifting it over the edges of rugs and the like. A further movement of the pin E permits a positive locking of the handle in IC an intermediate depressed position, the pos tion in which it is shown in Figure 9. A rigidmounting of the handle in relation to the cleaner is useful for many purposes. for example for permitting the cleaner to be 10 readily manipulated in cleaning stairs or in lifting it from one level to another.

The handle is adjustable as to length by employment of the structure shown in Figures 2 to 5 inclusive and including an upper 11 handle member G longitudinally slidable in the lower handle D The spring leaf G and its controlling cam Gr provides locking means operable at any point-along the flattened portion (it of the member G thus permitting a 11 very substantial adjustment of the length of the handle.

I claim:

1. In a vacuumcleaner, a cleaner body, a handle pivoted in relation thereto, means 15 tending normally to move said handle into a generally upright position', including a lever, an operative connection between said lever and said handle, and yielding means tending normally to rotate said lever in a predetermined direction, and a housing within which said lever is pivoted, said housing being apertured to permit the lever to extend therefrom, opposite ends of said aperture beiting the are through which said lever and handle may rotate.

2. In a vacuum cleaner, a cleaner body, a housing positioned upon said body, a handle pivoted in relation to said housing, the axis of rotation of said handle passing through said housing, means tending normally to move said handle into a generally upright position, including a lever pivoted within said housing and an operative connection between said lever and said handle, and yielding means tending normally to rotate said lever in a predetermined direction; in combination with a locking element, associated with said housing, and means for moving it, said element being adapted, when in one position to restrict the rotation of said handle to an are less than its normal maximum arc of possible rotation.

3. In a vacuum cleaner, a cleaner body, a housing positioned upon said body, a handle pivoted in relation to said housing, the axis of rotation of said handle passing through said housing, means tending normally to move said handle into a generally upright position, including a lever pivoted within said housing and an operative connection between said lever and said handle, and yielding means tending normally to rotate said lever in a predetermined direction; in combination with a locking element associated with said housing, and means for moving it, said element being adapted, when in one position, to prevent rotation of said handle.

4. In a vacuum cleaner, a cleaner body, a housing positioned upon said body, a handle. pivoted in relation to said housing, the axis of rotation of said handle passing through said housing, means tending normally to move said handle into a generally upright position, including a lever pivoted within said housing and an operative connection between said lever and said handle, and yielding means tending normally to rotate said lever in a predetermined direction; in combination with a locking pin slidably mounted in said housing, and means for moving it, including a handle element projecting upwardly through the housing, the housing being slotted, said pin being adapted, when in one position, to restrict the rotation-of said handle to an are less than its normal maximum arc of possible rotation, and being adapted when in another position, to lock the handle against rotation.

5. In a vacuum cleaner, a cleaner body, means for positioning said body, in predetermined position, upon a generally horizontal supporting surface, a handle pivoted in relation thereto, the weight of the handle being i'nsuflicient of itself to tilt the cleaner body. yielding means tending normally to move said handle into generally upright position, and means for limiting the are through which said handle may be moved, and means for locking the handle at a predetermined position within the are.

6. In a vacuum cleaner, a cleaner body. means for positioning said body, in predetermined position, upon a generally horizontal supporting surface, a handle pivoted in relation thereto, the weight of the handle being insufficient of itself to tilt the cleaner body, yielding means tending normally to move said handle into generally upright position. and means for limiting the are through which said handle may be moved, and additional means for limiting the movement of the handie to an arc less than the maximum arc of movement of the handle, and means for locking the handle at a' predetermined position within the maximum arc.

WILLIAM J. oLnMnN'rs'

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2691790 *Nov 9, 1950Oct 19, 1954Edward O'shei WilliamWindscreen wiper
US2727762 *Oct 11, 1954Dec 20, 1955Hoover CoTube couplings
US2739331 *Jan 30, 1953Mar 27, 1956Morris GoodmanGolf club attachment
US2879528 *Apr 23, 1953Mar 31, 1959Walter S FinnellFloor working machine
US3046041 *Oct 14, 1960Jul 24, 1962Giugher Mfg CompanyClamping arrangement
US3123108 *Feb 1, 1961Mar 3, 1964 Radial arm saw
US3142857 *Feb 19, 1962Aug 4, 1964Mefina SaVacuum cleaners
US3204272 *Dec 28, 1962Sep 7, 1965Electrolux CorpFloor treating device with articulated handle
US3239243 *Apr 1, 1963Mar 8, 1966Electrolux AbLocking means for telescopically fitted members
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US3404427 *Nov 18, 1966Oct 8, 1968William V Mack IncAdjustable extension-handle
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US8702339Jun 24, 2011Apr 22, 2014Manic Nomad, LLCClamp
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Classifications
U.S. Classification403/66, 403/104, 403/321, 403/109.5, 15/DIG.100, 15/410, 15/144.4, 403/374.5
International ClassificationA47L9/32
Cooperative ClassificationA47L9/325, Y10S15/10
European ClassificationA47L9/32C