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Publication numberUS1918754 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 18, 1933
Filing dateJan 23, 1932
Priority dateJan 23, 1932
Publication numberUS 1918754 A, US 1918754A, US-A-1918754, US1918754 A, US1918754A
InventorsWalter Johnson
Original AssigneeCharles E Perkins
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Puzzle
US 1918754 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 18, 1933. w JOHNSON 1,918,754

PUZZLE Filed Jan; 23, 9

Patented July 18, 1933 UNITED STATES PATENT 1 OFFICE WALTER JOHNSON, OF MOUNT DORA,-.FLORIDA, ASSIGNOR OF ONE-HALF E.- PERKINS, OF MOUNT DORA, FLORIDA.

TO CHARLES PUZZLE Application filed January 23, 1932. Serial No. 588,268. I i

This invention relates to new and useful improvements in puzzles.

"An object of the invention is to provide a puzzle comprising a plurality of pivotally 5 connected parts or sections, the parts or sections being so shaped and pivotally connected that they may be extended to represent a figure, as a person, animal, bird or other object or the like, and folded or collapsed into a circle or into a substantially circular shape, the act of extending and collapsing the parts or sections being somewhat diflicultand puzzlin to those not familiarwith the puzzle, but being a relatively simple matter to those familiar with the necessary procedure.

Another object is to provide a puzzle as stated and in which the various parts or seetions are preferably formed of sheet material, as sheet celluloid in various colors. 1 f

' Other objects and advantages will become apparent from a consideration ofthe following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawing wherein the invention is shown. It is of course to be understood that the invention is notlimitedto the details shownand described and that the invention includes all such variations and modifications as fall within the spirit of the invention or the scope of the appended claims to which claims reference should be had for a definition of the invention. a

In the drawing:

Fig. 1 is an elevational view of the puzzle when extended, the parts of the puzzle being so shaped that the extended puzzle represents in general the figure of a man; Fig.2 is a similar view showing the position of the parts at the end of their initial movement toward collapsed-position or in their second pos1t1on when the puzzle 1s being extended;

Fig. 3 is an elevational View showing the relative location of the parts at the end of their second step toward collapsed position or at the end of their first step toward extended position;

Fig. 4 is an elevational view showing the puzzle completely collapsed; and

' Fig; 5*is an elevatlonal view showing the puzzle extended when the parts have been cut to have the puzzle whenin extended condition represent a horse and indicating how the parts may be formed to represent other figures than that of Figures 1 to 4:. I

Referring in detail to the drawing the improved puzzle includes a number of parts, in the present instance five parts numbered respectively 6, 7, 8, 9, and-10. The section 7 partially overlies sections 6 and Sand is pivoted to them as at 11 and 12 respectively. Similarly section 1.0 partially overlies sections 6 and 9 and is pivoted to them at 13 and 14: respectively. Section 9 partially over lies section 8 and these sections are pivotally connected as by the pivot 15. The pivots 11, 12, 13, 1 1 and 15 may be in the form of "hollow rivets as shown although this is not necessary since the parts may be pivoted together in anydesired manner.

It is to be noted that the pivots are equally spaced or arranged at the apexes of the angles of a pentagon. Further, it will be seen by reference to the drawing that each part or section has aIcu'rved or arcuate edge 16,

the arcof each, edge 16 being struck on the same radius whereby when the puzzle is collapsed the edges 16 will unite to form a circle or substantially circular line defining the outer edge ofthe puzzle as shown in Figure 4. In this connection-attention is called to the fact that the greatest length of each of the parts or sections is no greater than the diameter of the circle formed by the edges 16 when the puzzle is collapsed or less than twice the radius on which the arcs represented by the edges 16 are struck. Also, the distance between any two of the pivots is no greater than the diameter of the circle formed by the edges 16 of the sections when, the puzzle is collapsed.

To collapse the puzzle from the position shown in Fig. 1 to that shown in Fig. the section6 can be swung downwardly or the section 7 upwardly as indicated by the arrows (4 and 6 into the position shown in Fig. 2. Next, the section 7 can be swung upwardly as indicated by arrow 0 or section 10 'swung'downwardly as indicated by arrow d.

This results in the pivot 14 passing pivot 11 and approaching the pivot 12, and in the section 10 swinging downwardly into the position shown in Fig. 2.

Further movement apart of the free ends of sections 8 and 9 results in the pivot 14 passing the pivot 12 and in a further lowering of the section 6 and in a further movement of the section 10 over the sections 6 and 7. After the pivot 14 passes over the pivot 12 the parts then assume the position shown in Fig. 3. If desired the device can be collapsed by first moving the lower ends of sections 8 and 9 laterally in opposite directions and upwardly about pivot 15 until pivots 12 and 14 pass each other. Then by moving section 6 to the left about pivot 13 the pivot 11 can be passed by pivot 14 and the sections brought to the collapsed position of Fig. 4. It will thus be seen that to collapse the figure the pivot 14 passes both pivots 11 and 12 in succession, but it is immaterial which one it passes firs WVith the parts arranged as shown in F igure 3 it is but necessary to move them all inwardly toward one another to swing them into the position shown in Figure 4, the pivots 12 and 14 moving apart toward the outer edges of the circle and the pivots 11 and 13 moving slightly inwardly toward the center of the puzzle as does the pivot 15. In this collapsed position the pivots are again at the apexes of the angles of a pentagon.

' The section 6 may be moved from its position as shown in Figure 1 to its substantial horizontal position as shown in Figure 2 either by directly engaging and moving the section or by manipulating the section through the arms or sections 7 and 10. Should this later procedure be followed the puzzle may be manipulated through the sections 7 and 10 to have the parts all assume therelative positions occupied by them in Figure 2.

"Further with the parts thus positioned they may be moved'into the positions shown in Figure 3 by holding the free end portion of the section 10 and pressing the free end of the section 6 toward it.

In extending the puzzle from the collapsed condition shown in Figure 4 to that of F igure 1 the reverse operation is followed. The ends of sections 8 and 9 may be grasped and swung downwardly or outwardly and downwardly to cause the pivots 14 and 12 to move toward one another. This will shift the parts into the position shown in Figure 3 and further movement of the sections through manipulation of the'sections 8 and 9 will cause other.

The parts will now be positioned as shown in Figure 2 and the free ends'of the sections the pivots 12 and 14 to pass each 8 and 9 are swung toward one another and thesection 6 then grasped at its outer edge.

and swung outwardly into the position shown in Figure 1 by passing pivot 11 by pivot 14.

The various sections may be given different and various shapes to form different figures when extended, such for example as animals, birds or other objects. An example is shown in Figure 5 representing a horse. This device is assembled and manipulated the same as the device of Figures 1 to 4 except that the different sections are given such outlines that when extended as in Figure 5 they represent the figure of a horse. When collapsed they all lie within the circle formed by the curved edges 16 the same as indicated in Figure 4. The sections are numbered 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 to' correspond with sections 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 respectively of Figures 1 to 4. The only difference is the sections are of different shapes to produce a difiierent figure.

It will of course be understood that the surfaces of the difl'erent sections can be decorated to improve the effect, such as by drawing ears, eyes, mouths, etc, and the sections may also be given diiferent colors. Until the principle is discovered of passing the movable pivots twice, such as both 11 and 12 by pivot 14, the various sections will get into all sorts of positions, making a very interesting problem and puzzle to straighten the sections out to either bring it to the expanded condition or to the collapsed condition.

Having thus set forth the nature of my invention, what I claim is:

1. A puzzle comprising five sections, pivots connecting each of said sections to two other of said sections, said pivots arranged equidistantly apart, each of said sections having a curved edge and the curved edges of all of the sections being struck on the same radius, each of said sections shaped to represent a part of a figure which the puzzle is to represent when extended, said sections adapted to be collapsed to have their curved edges form an approximate circular line defining the outer edge of the collapsed puzzle, and the greatest length of each section being not more than the diameter of said circle whereby the sections do not extend out of said circle when the puzzle is collapsed.

2. A puzzle adapted to be extended to represent a figure and to be collapsed into substantially the form of a circle, said puzzle comprising sections pivotally connected at equally spaced points, each of said sections shaped to form a part of a figure which the puzzle represents when extended, each of said sections having a curved edge, and said sections adapted when collapsed to dispose their curved edges outwardly whereby said curved edges define substantially a circle when the puzzle is collapsed.

3. A puzzle adapted to be extended to represent a figure and to be collapsed into substantially the form of a circle,' said puzzle comprising sections pivotally connected at equally spaced points, each of said sections shaped to form a part of a figure which the puzzlerepresents when extended, each of said sections having a curved edge, said sections having their curved edges disposed inwardly when the puzzle is extended, and said sections adapted When being collapsed to move to dispose their curved edges outwardly whereby to have said curved edges form an approximately circular line defining the outer edge of the collapsedpuzzle.

4. A puzzle adapted to be extended to represent a figure and to be collapsed into substantially the form of a circle, said puzzle comprising sections pivotally connected at equally spaced points, each of said sections shaped to form a part of a figure which the puzzle represents when extended, each of said sections having a curved edge, said sections adapted when collapsed to dispose their curved edges outwardly whereby said curved edges form an approximately circular line defining the outer edge of the collapsed puzzle, and the greatest length of each of said sections being not more than the diameter of said circle whereby the sections do not extend beyond the circle when the puzzle is collapsed.

5. A puzzle adapted to be extended to represent a figure and to be collapsed into su stantially the form of a circle, said puzzle comprising a section, a pair of sections pivoted at one side of the first section, a second pair of sections pivoted adjacent the same side of the first pair of sections as the first mentioned section, a pivot connecting the sections of the second pair of sections in partly overlapped relation, all of said pivots spaced 'equi-distantly apart, each of said sections shaped to form apart of a figure which the puzzle is to represent when, extended, a plurality of said sections having curved edges, and said sections adapted when the puzzle is collapsed to have their curved edges define substantially a circle.

6. A puzzle comprising a plurality of pivotally connected sections, the pivots arranged equi-distantly, said sections having curved edges and adapted to be extended to represent a'figure and collapsed into a substantially circular shape.

WALTER JOHNSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4708687 *Feb 7, 1986Nov 24, 1987Coleco Industries, Inc.Rolling figure toy
US4878872 *Sep 7, 1988Nov 7, 1989Johnson Cynthia LAdjustable animal appearing toy
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/155, 446/376
International ClassificationA63F9/06, A63F9/08
Cooperative ClassificationA63F9/088
European ClassificationA63F9/08G