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Publication numberUS1919520 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 25, 1933
Filing dateJun 20, 1927
Priority dateJun 20, 1927
Publication numberUS 1919520 A, US 1919520A, US-A-1919520, US1919520 A, US1919520A
InventorsHerman Fred W, Laddon Isaac M, Ring William A
Original AssigneeBendix Brake Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Controlling means
US 1919520 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 25, 1933. I l. M. LADDON El AL 1,919,520

I CQNTROLLING MEANS 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 20, 1927 F/af INVENTOR ISSAC M-LADDON WILLIAM A mm;

ATTORNEY FRED N- HERMRN July 25, 1933 I. M. LADDON' El" AL CONTROLLING MEANS Filed June 26, 1927 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR' |55AC M- LADDON -WILL\AM A. R[NG| FRED w. HERMA ATTORNEY Jul 25,1933;

l. M. LADDON ET AL g CONTROLLING MEANS Filed June 20, 1927 QSheets-Sheet 3 INVENITOR ISSAC M. LADDON WILLIAM.A.R\NG| FRED w. HERMAN Patented July 25, 1933 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE ISAAC M. LADDON, WILLIAM A. RING, AND FRED W. IEL'IERJMIAN, OF DAYTON, OHIO, ASSIGNORS TO BENDIX BRAKE COMPANY, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, A. CORPORATION OF ILLINOIS CONTROLLING MEANS Application filed June 20,

This invention relates to controlling means for aeroplanes and the like, and is illustrated as embodied in novel means for controlling the brakes and the rudder of an aeroplane.

In one desirable arrangement, the rudder (or an equivalent steering device) is operated by a centrally-pivotel rudder bar which also carries the brake-applying pedals or the like. This permits the pilot to operate either or both of the brakes, or the rudder, Without removing his feet from the pedals. The particular mechanism mounted on the bar also embodies in itself substantial novelty.

The above and other features of the inven tion will be apparent from the following description of one illustrative embodiment shown in the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a front elevation of the con trolling means, and of adjacent parts of the aeroplane;

Figure 2 is a side elevation of the controlling means shown in Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a top plan view of the controlling means;

Figure 4 is a front elevation of one of the pedals;

gigure 5 is a side elevation of the pedal; an

Figure 6 is a perspective view of the aeroplane, broken away to show the rudder and brake mechanism.

In the arrangement selected for illustration, the aeroplane includes an elevating device 10 operated by the usual means, a rudder 12 or some equivalent steering device, operated by cables or the like, 14, and a pair of brakes on the landing wheels, one of which brakes is shown diagrammatically at 16. and which brakes are operated by cables or the like 18. The present invention relates to the means for operating the rudder 12 and the brakes 16, or equivalent parts.

Preferably the rudder is operated by a rudder bar 20, mounted at its center 'by a pivot 22 on a cross member 24, and to the opposite ends of which the cables 14 are shown connected. 1

Bar 20 has at its opposite ends pairs of arms 26, between each pair of which is 1927. serial No. 199,981.

mounted a novel reversible and adjustable channel-section pedal 28 on pivots 30. Each of the pedals can be reversed from full-line position to dotted-line position in Figure 5, or vice versa, to adjust it for height to suit the pilot. y

In dotted-line position, the pedal is held by a spring-pressed plunger or catch 32, while in full-line position it is held by engagement with one or more lugs 34. Lugs 34, or catch 32, may be provided either on the arms 26 or on the pedal itself. When the catch is mounted on one of the arms 26, it may engage an opening 36 in the pedal.

Each of the pedals is connected by a tension element 38, such as a short cable, with the longer arm of a lever 40 pivoted at 42 on the bar 20. The ends of the brake-applying cables 18 are attached to the levers 40, which may, if desired, be formed with guide sectors 44 carrying the cables immediately adjacent the axis about which bar 20 swings, so that the brakes are not affected by manipulation of the rudder.

The above-described mechanism may, if desired, be reversed to be hung from above instead of mounted on a member below the rudder bar.

While one illustrative embodiment has been described in detail, it is not our intention to limit the scope of the invention to that particular embodiment, or otherwise than by the terms of the appended claims.

We claim:

1. In an airplane, a control surface, wheels, brakes for said wheels, a centrally pivoted horizontal bar, means cooperating with said bar for operating said control surface, a pair of levers pivotally mounted end to end on said bar. connections between said lever and said brakes, and pedals mounted on theends of said bar and connected respectively to said levers.

2. An airplane comprising a control surface, a pair of wheels, brakes for said wheels, a centrally pivoted horizontal bar, means actuated by said bar for operating said control surface, a pair of levers pivotally mounted end to end on, said bar, connections between said lever and said brakes for operating said brakes, and pedals acting both on said bar and on said levers.

3. An airplane, comprising a control surface, a pair of wheels, brakes for said wheels, 3. pair of levers arranged end to end, connections actuated by said levers for, operating said brakes, pedals operating said levers respectively when rocked about their axes, and means actuated by bodily movement of the pedal for operating said control surface.

4. An airplane comprising a control surface, a pair of wheels, brakes for said wheels, a pair of levers pivoted intermediate their ends and arranged end to end and connected at their adjacent ends to operate said brakes,

' pedals at the outer ends of the levers operating said levers respectively when rocked about their axes and means operated by bodily movement of the pedals for actuating said control surface.

5. An airplane comprising a control surface, a pair of wheels, brakes for said wheels, a pair of levers arranged end to end, connections between said levers and said brakes, and

edals actuated when rocked about their axes or operatingsaid levers respectively.

6. An airplane comprising a control surface, a pair of wheels, brakes for said wheels,

a pair of levers pivoted intermediate their ends and arranged end to end and connected at their adjacent ends to operate the brakes, and pedals at the outer ends of the levers operating said levers respectively when rocked about their axes.

7. In an'airplane a rudder, a rudder bar for controlling said rudder, a pair of wheels, a pair of brakes for said wheels, and a pair of brake levers arranged end to end on said rudder bar for controlling said brakes.

8. In an airplane a rudder, a rudder bar for controlling said rudder, a pair of wheels, a pair of brakes for said wheels, and a pair of brake levers arranged end to end on said rudder bar for controlling said brakes, and each provided with an operating connection approximately at the center of the bar and leading to said brakes.

9. In an airplane a rudder, arudder bar for controlling said rudder, a pair of wheels, apair of brakes for said wheels, and a pair of brake levers arranged end to end on said rudder bar for controlling said brakes, both provided with an operating'connection approximately at the center of the bar each leading to its respective brake, and both positioned with their outer ends adjacent to the opposite ends of the bar.

ISAAC M. LADDON. WILLIAM A. RING. FRED W. HERMAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2420528 *Oct 24, 1944May 13, 1947Curtiss Wright CorpRudder pedal assembly
US4192476 *Jul 14, 1978Mar 11, 1980Northrop CorporationRudder pedal adjustment system
US4815679 *May 6, 1987Mar 28, 1989Perry John CWheel brake assembly
US4848708 *Nov 13, 1987Jul 18, 1989The Boeing CompanyAdjustable assembly for aircraft rudder, brake and nose landing gear steering control
US5056742 *Oct 6, 1989Oct 15, 1991The Boeing CompanyModular rudder pedal and brake control assembly for aircraft
US6918316Mar 5, 2002Jul 19, 2005Technology Holding CompanyAdjustable pedal assembly
US20020092374 *Mar 5, 2002Jul 18, 2002Mattias JohanssonAdjustable pedal assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification244/235, 244/111
International ClassificationB64C25/00, B64C25/48
Cooperative ClassificationB64C25/48
European ClassificationB64C25/48