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Publication numberUS1920186 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 1, 1933
Filing dateDec 10, 1930
Priority dateDec 10, 1930
Publication numberUS 1920186 A, US 1920186A, US-A-1920186, US1920186 A, US1920186A
InventorsCarter Herbert F
Original AssigneeWestern Electric Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Heating system
US 1920186 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. F. CARTER HEATING SYSTEM Aug. 1, 1933.

2 Sheets-Sheet Filed Dec. 10, 1930 INVENTOR H. FCAR TER 5 Y RX\W ATTORNEY H. F. CARTER HEATING SYSTEM Aug. 1, 1933.

Filed Dec. 10, 1930 2 Sheets-Sneet 2 Pie. 5.

lNVENTOR /'1. E CARTER A TTURNEY Patented Aug. 1, 1933 UNITED STATES" PATENT OFFICE HEATING. SYSTEM Herbert F. Carter, Roselle Park, N. J., assigrior to Western. Electric. Company, Incorporated, New York, N. Y.',' a CorporationofNew York Application'December 10, 1930. Serial No. 501,217

' -v'oitims. "(01. 158-1.)

This invention relates to heating systems and more particularly to heating systems utilizing fluid fuel. I I a In melting lead or other metals having relative- 1y low melting points, the metal, in sorne in.-

stances, is placed in a kettle and suspended in of an oil spray being fedinto a combustion chamber. In one embodiment of the invention, a furnace is provided with a combustion chamber and, through the wall thereof, with a duct leading to the chamber. A fuel oil supply nozzle or burner so positioned outside the ch mber as to direct a spray of fuel oil through the duct, and a pilot burner located outsidethe chamber projects a flame at right angles to the path of the spray prior to its entering the duct, to ignite the fuel. A second and concurrently operated pilot burner is positioned to project a flame through a pass in the chamber wall, which flame encounters the spray stream within the duct.

A better understanding of the invention may be had by reference to the followingdetailed description read in connection with the accompanying drawings forming a 'partthereof, in which Fig. 1 is a schematic elevational view of a heating system embodying the invention;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary enlarged view showing details of one heating unit shown at the right in Fig. 1; p f

Fig. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary view taken from the right in Fig. 1, showing the heating unit of Fig. 2 in side elevation, and r Fig. 4is a fragmentary section taken on the line 4-4 of Fig. 2.

Referring to the drawings, wherein similar parts are indicated by identical referencenumerals, a heating system 10 consists of a furnace 11 having a circular vertical wall 12 of fire brick, or othersuitable heat resisting material. At the inner upper edge thereof the circular wall'is provided with an annular recess 13 in which is engaged a kettle 14 of any suitable type having a projecting annular flange 15 which rests in the I recess 13. Over the furnace and kettle is'placed a lid 16 of any suitable type for confining heat therein and protecting the contentsof the kettle.

' eluding a pilot tube 34, which extends horizon- The area inside the wall of the furnace comprises a combustion chamber 17, which is provided with a central raised floor 18, and annular groove or channel 19 being provided between the raised floor 18 and the wall of the furnace. The furnace is also provided with'a flue 50 connected to any suitable exhausting blower or high chimney (not shown) for creating a strong draft through the combustion chamber.

At diametrically opposed points in the periphcry of the wall 12 are formed a pair of angular recesses 2020, in each of which is mounted a heating unit generally designated by the numer- Y al 21. It will be understood that the heating units 21-21 may be identical, and it is thereforethought necessary to describe only one in its entirety. Accordingly, the recess 20, shown in full lines in Fig. 1, and as more clearly indi- *cated in Fig. 4, includes a face wall 23 and a side wall 24 extending at right angles thereto. stationed in the recess 20 by any suitable supporting means (not shown) the heating unit 21 consists of an upper burner or fuel oil sprayingnozzle 25, and directly therebeneath a smaller burner or spraying nozzle 26. The burner 25 is connected in a supply line 28 through which is furnished under pressure a spray of fuel oil for firing the furnace, the burner being pointed in such direction that the fuel oil spray travels horizontally toward and at right angles to the 5 plane of the face wall 23 The circular wall 12 of the furnace is provided-with a duct 29 which extends tangentially with respect to the channel 19 from the combustion chamber to the face wall 23 of the recess. Adjacent the outer end of the duct 29 is provided a sealing wall 30 of any suitable fire-proof material. This wall, and the face wall23, are provided with an aperture 31, of lesser diameter thanthe duct in order to exclude air, and whichis horizontally aligned with the mouth of the nozzle 25 and flared in the 1 into the combustion chamber by the strong draft:

of the flue 50.

To the right of the furnace, as viewed in Fig. l, is positioned a supply line 33 for supplying i1- luminating gas fuel to a pilot arrangement in-:

tally along the face wall 23 on a level with the nozzle 25 and terminates a short distance from the'path of the fuel spray as shown in Fig. 2. Immediately above the pilot tube 34 and extend-' ing parallel therewith from the supply line 33 is a second pilot tube 35. This tube is provided with an elbow joint 36 in which is fitted a shorter length 37 of similartubing, which is inclined from the vertical plane of the pilot tube 34 to extend into the outer end of a diagonally disposed passageway 38, which is formed through the material of the sealing wall 30, opening at the inner end thereof on the inner surface of the aperture 31. The outer end of the passageway 38 isjust above the end of the pilot tube 34 and a portion of the illuminating gas which flows from the tube 34 is drawn through the passageway and exteriorly of the tube 35 by the draft of the flue 50/ A valve 38 is mounted in eachjof the tubes 34 and 35 for controlling the flow of gas therein.

The lower nozzle 26 forms part of an auxiliary burner arrangement similar to that described above'in relation with the larger nozzle 25, being connected in a supply line 39 through which may be furnished under pressure a spray of fuel oil.

' Also, this burner is pointed in such direction that 26 passes therethrough without obstruction and by the draftof the. flue 50, throughthe ,duct

29 and into the channel 19 of thecombustion chamber. Directly beneath the pilot tube 34 and connected to the supply line '33is a pilot tube 41 which extends horizontally along the face. wall-.23 on a leyel with the nozzle 26 and, terminates a short distance from the path of the spray therefrom, as shown in Fig. 2. ately above the pilot tube 41 and extending parallel therewith from the supply line 33 is a second This tube is provided withan elbow joint 43 in which is fitted a shorter.

pilot tube 42.

length not similar tubing, which is inclined from the vertical plane of the pilot tube 41 to extend into the outer end of a diagonally dis-.

posed passageway 45, which isformed through the material of the sealing wall 30, coinciding with the passageway 38, andopening at its inner end on the inner surface of the aperture'40. The

outer end of the passageway 45 is just above the end of the pilot tube 41, and a, portion of the illuminating gas which flows from the tube 41 is drawn into the passageway and exteriorly of the tube 44 by the draft of the flue 50.. A valve 51 is mounted on each of the tubes 41 and 42 for controlling the flow of gas therein. 1

In operation the kettle is loaded with a proper: charge of metal to be melted and both heating units 21-21 are placed in operation. The pilot tubes or burners 34,35, 41 and 42 are lighted,

gas being obtained from the supply line 33 by turningvalves 38 and 51, and both the large and small burners 25 and 26 are operated. The spray therefrom is directed to pass through the apertures 31 and 40, respectively. 'In so doing,

it will be observed (as best indicated by the arrows in Figs. 3 and 4) that the spray. encounters first gas flames 46 and 47 from the pilot burners 34 and 41, vrespectively. These flames ignite the streams of spray, which are carried through the apertures in the sealing wall into contact with diagonally directed flames48 and 49 from the pilot burners35 and 42, respectively, the burning spray being continually forced along the duct 29 and into the combustion chamber 17 of the furnace. It willbe noted that thespray from the lower burner 26 passes through the ,burner 35 by the draft. Immedi- I thereof burning, however.

combustion; chamber thus evenly distributing the developed heat throughout the interior of the furnace.

Both pilot burners at each nozzle are kept in operation with the nozzle'so that the stream of spray, in passing into the duct 29, passes in succession one pilot flame extending at right angles across its path outside of the sealing wall,

and a second pilotflame extending diagonally across its path inside the sealing wall. Under such conditions explosions, backfiring, etc., occurring within the combustion chamber or duct, may extinguish either of the pilot lights by exerting pressure, in the case of the ,upper nozzle 25, through the aperture 31 to extinguish the flame 46 from the pilot burner 34, or through the passageway 38 to extinguishthe flame 48 from the pilot burner 35. However, due to the divergent paths afforded the expanding gases of explosion namely, either the aperture 31 or the diagonal passageway38, the pressure is not sufficiently great at both points as to extinguish both pilot flames 46 and 48 during the same explosion. If the explosion takes place through the aperture 31 to extinguish theburner 34, the

burner 35 remains lighted and immediately relights the pilot 34 by igniting that portion of the gas from pilot 34 which is drawn around the If the explosion takes place through the passageway 38, the pilot 35 maybe extinguished but, since the pilot 34 is placed below the outer end of the passageway, it is not extinguished, and the pilot 35 is immediately relighted by that portion of the flame from the pilot 34 which is drawn into the passageway 3,8 to envelop the pilot 35. The same method of operation is used in connection with the lower burner 26, the pilots 40 and 41 thereof cooperating to maintain either flame 47 or 49 playing upon the stream of spray at all times when the nozzle is in operation.

In usual practice, the upper burner may be thermostatically controlled by any suitable means (not shown) so that it is cut off automatically when the temperature of the metal reaches a predetermined point, leaving the pilots The lower burner is maintained in operation continually in order to keep the metal from cooling too rapidly when the upper burner is cut off. When the temperature of 'the metal drops too far, the upper burner is again operated, the fuel therefrom being instantaneously ignited by the pilots 34 and 35 thereof.

.By projecting the flames from the two pilot burners across the path of the fuel supply at spaced points, the necessity for manual relighting of the pilot light upon its extinguishment, and close attention thereto, is obviated and the possibility of the discharge of oil into the furnace without combustion, and the consequent risk of possibly disastrous explosion and waste of fuel is removed.

What is claimed is:

1. In a heating system, a combustion chamber,

. a duct leading to the combustion chamber for conducting fuel thereto, and means at one end of the duct for projecting flames across the path of the fuel at spaced points to ignite the fuel, said means comprising a wall having an aperture communicating with said duct and a passageway diagonally disposed with respect to said aperture and extending into said aperture, a pilot tube adjacent said aperture remote from said duct, and a second pilot tube located in said passageway.

2. In a heating system, a combustion chamber,

, a wall having an aperture and a passageway into said aperture, a nozzle for supplying fuel to the chamber through the aperture, and a plurality of pilot burners positioned to direct flames between the nozzle and the combustion chamber to ignite the fuel, one of said pilot burners located in saidpassageway, and another of said pilot burners located adjacent and beneath the end of said passageway remote from said aperture, said first mentioned pilot burner having a smaller perimeter than the inside of said passageway.

3. In a heating system, a nozzle, a wall having an aperture co-axial with the mouth of said nozzle and having a larger area at the end remote from said nozzle than at the end adjacent said nozzle, a combustion chamber having a duct and an annular groove for supplying fuel to the system in a path through said aperture, and a plurality of pilot burners positioned to project flames across the path of the fuel at spaced points to ignite the fuelf'said duct extending tangentially to said annular groove and having a larger area than that of said aperture.

4. In a heating system, a combustion chamber, a heating unit, a wall located between said combustion chamber and said heating unit, said wall having an aperture into said combustion chamber and a passageway extending diagonally into said aperture, said heating unit directing fuel to the chamber through said aperture, and a plurality of pilot burners positioned to project chamber, one of said pilot burners positioned within said passageway and another of said pilot burners positioned external to and below said passageway so that a portion of the flame therefrom is projected into said passageway external -to said first mentioned pilot burner.

5. In a heatingsystem, a wall having an aperture therein and a passageway extending diagonally into said aperture, a heating unit for sup- .plying fuel to the system in a predetermined path through said aperture, and a plurality of pilot burners positioned to project flames in different directions across the path of the fuel to ignite the fuel, one of said pilot burners positioned to project a flame through said passageway into said aperture, and another of said pilot burners positioned to project a flame adjacent said aperture.

6. In a heating system, a combustion chamber having an aperture, means positioned outside the chamber for projecting a stream of fuel into the chamber by way of the aperture, a pilot burner for projecting a flame at a predetermined angle across the stream between said fuel projecting means and said aperture, and a second pilot burner for projecting a flame into said aperture across the stream at a different angle.

7. In combination, a furnace having a combustion chamber, a duct extending through the furnace to the combustion chamber, a wall partially closing the duct and having an aperture, means positioned outside the furnace for projecting a stream of fuel through the aperture, means for projecting a pilot flame at a predetermined angle across the fuel stream on one side of the wall, and means for projecting a second pilot flame through the wall into'the aperture and across the fuel stream.

flames across the path of the fuel at spaced points to ignite the fuel before it reaches the HERBERT F. CARTER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2443259 *Jul 12, 1945Jun 15, 1948Standard Oil Dev CoBurner for combustible gases
US2943850 *Mar 26, 1956Jul 5, 1960Wooten Moseley JohnGas fired tobacco curers
US4126427 *Mar 7, 1977Nov 21, 1978British Gas CorporationCoal gasification plant
US5257927 *Nov 1, 1991Nov 2, 1993Holman Boiler Works, Inc.To reduce emissions
US5603906 *Nov 20, 1995Feb 18, 1997Holman Boiler Works, Inc.Low NOx burner
US7972133 *Sep 26, 2008Jul 5, 2011Alstom Technology Ltd.Burner for the operation of a heat generator and method of use
WO1994021357A1 *Mar 22, 1994Sep 29, 1994Holman Boiler Works IncLOW NOx BURNER
Classifications
U.S. Classification431/175, 431/173
International ClassificationF23C99/00
Cooperative ClassificationF23C99/00, F23C2700/023
European ClassificationF23C99/00