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Publication numberUS1920533 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 1, 1933
Filing dateSep 13, 1932
Priority dateSep 13, 1932
Publication numberUS 1920533 A, US 1920533A, US-A-1920533, US1920533 A, US1920533A
InventorsStrauss Nathan J
Original AssigneeFreydberg Bros Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Material for wrapping or covering articles
US 1920533 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

l 1933- N. J.. STRAUSS 1,920,533

TERIAL FOR WRAPPING OH POVERING ARTICLES Filed Sept. 13. 1952 INVENTOR.

/VA THAN J. STRAUSS c Isl/M ATTORNEY Patented Aug. 1, 1933 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Nathan J. Strauss, New York, N. assignor to Freydberg Bros Inc., New York, N. Y., a Carporation of New York Application September 13, 1932 Serial No. 633,010

8 Claims. (01. 281-34) My invention relates to sheet material for covering articles and surfaces, and covers made from such material.

Though the materials made in accordance with my invention are adaptable to use in connection with various articles or application to various surfaces, I have shown and will describe, for the purposes of illustration, the use of the material in the form of a wrapper or outer cover for books.

10 Generally, the publishers of books apply a printed paper cover over the permanent binding, the cover being fitted loosely around the binding and having its ends folded or tucked in at the side edges of the book binding. Such temporary covers usually contain printed matter including the title of the book,'which is also on the binding but obscured by the paper cover. Furthermore,

these paper covers do not-last long, as their lon-.

gitudinal edges are exposed at the top and bottom of the sides and back of the binding, that is, just at the places where persons place their fingers on the binding to remove the book from a shelf. Plain paper covers are also subjected to.

perspiration from readers. hands, and become rumpled, soiled, and are easily torn. Often the permanent bindings which are obscured by the paper covers, arequite decorative, and owners remove the paper covers from their books when.

placing the books in bookcases so that the permanent bindings are exposed to view. However,

the bindings are then also exposed to atmospheric conditions and dust.

With my invention, paper covers may be dispensed with, and a covering provided by the publishers for the books or permanent bindings, which covering will not only protect the binding during the time that the books are in the stores and being read, but which may be left on the books by the owners when the books are placed in bookcases without detracting from the appearance of the books or collection of books. This is due to the fact that the coverings are made pref erably of thin transparent or substantially transarent material, prepared in accordance with my invention, and having opposite edges bound with a strip of metal foil or other pliant non-resilient material which when creased will maintain the sheet in folded condition along lines extending betweenand intersecting the bound edges. The binding. strips not only maintain the sheet in folded condition but also decorate the cover and appear as a trim to its edges while chiefly serving to strengthen the edges, where the wear usually is greatest.

I prefer to have the material water-proofed so that it will resist moisture and perspiration to protect the surface or article covered. The foregoing and other features and advantages of the invention will be explained in detail hereinafter in connection with the accompanying drawing wherein,

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a roll of matev rial embodying the invention;

.Fig, 2 is an exaggerated transverse sectionalview through the material shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a perspective view,of a book covered with material embodying the invention; and

Fig. 4 is a view similar ,to Fig. 2 of another form of material embodying the invention.

Materials embodying the invention may be made and sold in the form of a roll from which individual sheets may be out by the user, or, the material may be furnished in bundles of individual sheets cut to the. proper size according to the purpose for which they are to be used. In Fig. l, I have shown a roll of substantially transparent material 5, preferably a cellulose material .known on the market as cellophane or glassine paper having applied to its longitudinal edges, binding strips 6 of flexible, pliant material, which when .creased or bent will hold its form. The binding may be metallic foil of any color applied to'opposite edges of the material 5 so that opposite faces of the material adjacent the edges are covered by portions"? and 8 of the strip 6 with the edge of the material enclosed and'protected by the intermediate portion of the binding strip connecting 'the portions '7 and 8. The binding strips 6 may be applied to the edges of the material by any suitable devices or machines and are preferably adhesively secured on to the material 5 in the form shown in Fig. 2. The

material can be made in widths according to spec- 1 ifications of those having use for it and furnished in the form shown in Fig. 1, so that the user can cut off desired lengths according to the purpose for which it isto be used, or, as mentioned, the material can be made in individual sheets of predetermined specified dimensions and furnished in stacks to the user. In the case of book covers, the material would be made of a width corresponding substantially to the length of the book, so that when applied as shown in Fig. 3, the binding strips 6 will be disposed along the top and bottom edges of the sides and back of the book binding with the ends of the cover folded around and under the front edges of the binding. Due to (the transparency of the material, the title and other matter appearing on the permanent binding will be clearly visible through the 110 cover, so that it is not necessary to print the title of the book on the cover as is done in the case of paper covers. Due to the fact that the binding strips 6 are non-resilient, they will when bent or folded around the edges of the binding, maintain the cover in proper position on the book and to a great extent prevent accidental displacement of the cover, thus overcoming the tendency of the slippery transparent material to unfold. If water-proofed transparent material is used, the cover will protect the binding against moisture either from the atmosphere, moist articles placed on the book, and perspiration from the hands of the reader. Furthermore, the trans parent material does not show the dirt and finger marks as do the paper covers.

It will be noted that in Fig. 3, the portions of the binding strip 6 on the cover across the back of the book are disposed at the top and bottom edges of the book where the greatest wear occurs, due to the factthat in removing a book from a shelf it is usual to place the fingers on the top edge of the back and tilt the book outwardly and then slide it oif of the shelf. The binding strips 6 reinforce these edges of the cover and prevent tearing when removing the book from the shelf or when placing it back in a bookcase.

In actual practice, when using the material for book covers, I have found that the foregoing features are not the only, desirable and advantageous features of the invention, because the binding strips 6 really appear as a trimming to the edges of the permanent binding, which is clearly visible through the transparent material, so that those persons who prefer to remove covers from books placed in a collection in bookcases in order that the binding will be exposed to view,

may leave the transparent cover constructed in accordance with my invention on their books, and thus protect the binding against dust, atmospheric conditions, and handling. .In fact, book covers such as shown in Fig. 3, may be furnished as a separate article or protective covering for books now in existence and having no cover.

In Fig. 4, I have shown another form of material embodying the invention, wherein the strips 6' are applied to the edges of the material in such a manner as to require no adhesive and to lock the strip on to the material. This is done by first folding a portion A of the strip 6 over the free edge of the material 5,.and then folding the portion A of the strip and the portion of the material5 covered by the flap A over upon the material Salong the free edge of the portion A, so that on one face the material 5 is covered by portion B ofthe strip'and on its other face by the portion A of the strip, and the portion C of thestrip with the part of the material 5 enclosed between the portions A andC, thus locking the strip on to the material without an adhesive agent by inter-folding. This form of the invention makes the binding strips slightly heavier and bulkier than in the form shown in Fig. 2, but this is not undesirable at all, as it increases the ability of the strips to maintain their folded form when the material is used as a book cover in the manner shown in Fig. 3. The material shown in Fig. 4 embodies all of the desirable features pointed out in connection with the construction of Fig. 2, such as transparency to show the articles or surfaces covered, and in row strip of metallic foil folded upon itself and the case of book covers the edges are strengthened against tearing, and the ability of the cover to maintain its position on the book binding is increased.

The possible uses for material constructed in accordance with my invention other than as book covers are many, and I wish to be understood as not necessarily limiting myself to the use of the material constructed in accordance with my invention to book covers.

I claim:

1. A covering or wrapping material comprising a sheet of thin substantially transparent flexible material, and a binding strip of pliant nonresilient material secured along each of two opposite edges of the sheet on both faces thereof and encasing said edges.

2. A covering or wrapping material comprising a sheet of thin substantially transparent material, and strips of pliant material secured to said material along its longitudinal edges, said strips and material being interfolded, and a substantial area of the transparent material between said edges being uncovered.

3. A covering or wrapping material comprising a sheet of thin substantially transparent material, and strips of metallic foil secured to said material along opposite edges, and covering portions of both faces of the material adjacent the edges.

4. A book cover comprising a rectangular sheet of thin material through which the book binding is visible, and pliant strips binding opposite edges of said sheet to be disposed along the top and bottom edges of the sides and back of the book 110 when the cover is applied, said strips covering areas of both faces of the sheet adjacent said edges.

5. A book cover comprising a sheet of thin, flexible, substantially transparent material having opposite longitudinal edges enclosed by strips of metal foil.

6. A material for covering books and other articles comprising a sheet of thin substantially transparent flexible material, a'relatively narrow strip of metallic foil folded upon itself and secured along two opposite edges of the sheet and encasing said edges and portions of the sheet therealong and leaving. a substantial area of the transparent material uncovered.

7. A material for covering books and other articles comprising a sheet of thin substantially transparent flexible material, a relatively narsecured alongtwo opposite edges of the sheetandencasing said edges and portions of the sheet therealong and leaving a substantial area of the transparent material uncovered, and said strips and the material encased. thereby being folded after application of the strips to said edges providing at least two layers of the'sheet'and at least three layers of the metallic foil along said edges. I v

8. As a new article of manufacture, an elongated strip of thin substantially transparent cellulosic material of much greater length than width, and strips of metallic foil secured to said material along, its opposite-longitudinal edges, said strips of foil cov'ering portions of both faces of the strip of cellulosic material and enclosing said longitudinal edges.

NATHAN J. STRAUSS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2475345 *Nov 7, 1945Jul 5, 1949Williams Russell JBook cover or jacket
US3080178 *Apr 17, 1959Mar 5, 1963Arthur BrodyBook covering device
US3365111 *Mar 21, 1966Jan 23, 1968Int Paper CoLaminated container
US3575289 *May 7, 1968Apr 20, 1971Georges E C BrousseReinforces rolls of newsprint
US3938831 *Jul 11, 1974Feb 17, 1976Franklin Mint CorporationMetal covered books
US4216620 *Dec 1, 1976Aug 12, 1980Highland Supply CorporationFlower pot wrap with lace pattern edging
US4950216 *Sep 26, 1988Aug 21, 1990Highland Supply CorporationMethod of forming a flower pot
US5007229 *Jun 20, 1989Apr 16, 1991Highland Supply CorporationMethod of wrapping utilizing a self adhering wrapping material
US5029412 *Aug 22, 1989Jul 9, 1991Highland Supply CorporationFlower pot or flower pot cover with pleated skirt and or base
US5038933 *Jun 2, 1989Aug 13, 1991Highland Supply CorporationWrapping material for providing a decorative covering
US5076874 *Sep 15, 1989Dec 31, 1991Highland Supply CorporationProcess for forming a paper, burlap or cloth flower pot cover
US5077937 *Sep 8, 1989Jan 7, 1992Highland Supply CorporationApparatus for providing a decorative cover for a flower pot using a collar
US5111613 *Jun 15, 1989May 12, 1992Highland Supply CorporationPleated flower pot or flower pot cover
US5120382 *Nov 30, 1990Jun 9, 1992Highland Supply CorporationProcess for forming a paper, burlap or cloth flower pot cover
US5129182 *Sep 11, 1989Jul 14, 1992Highland Supply CorporationFlower pot accessory
US5184390 *May 27, 1992Feb 9, 1993Highland Supply CorporationMethod of shaping and holding a sheet of material about a flower pot with a collar
US5199242 *Mar 29, 1991Apr 6, 1993Highland Supply CorporationMethod for wrapping flower pots using a self adhering wrapping material
US5228934 *Jul 30, 1991Jul 20, 1993Highland Supply CorporationMethod of forming a flower pot or flower pot cover with controlled pleats
US5259106 *Sep 1, 1992Nov 9, 1993Highland Supply CorporationMethod of making a flower pot or flower pot cover with pleated skirt
US5274900 *Dec 3, 1992Jan 4, 1994Highland Supply CorporationMethod of shaping and holding a sheet of material about a flower pot with a collar
US5303506 *Oct 13, 1992Apr 19, 1994Highland Supply CorporationBasket flower pot with decorative cover
US5327635 *Apr 14, 1993Jul 12, 1994Highland Supply CorporationMethod of making a flower pot or flower pot cover with pleated skirt
US5349739 *Oct 8, 1992Sep 27, 1994Highland Supply CorporationFlower pot accessory
US5402601 *Feb 4, 1991Apr 4, 1995Highland Supply CorporationCover/wrap system
US5501039 *Jul 26, 1994Mar 26, 1996Highland Supply CorporationMethod of forming a flower pot or flower pot cover with controlled pleats
US5654049 *Dec 22, 1994Aug 5, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Self adhering wrapping material
US6131332 *Dec 11, 1997Oct 17, 2000Southpac Trust International, Inc.Plant cover/wrap system
US6321486Dec 17, 1999Nov 27, 2001Southpac Trust International, Inc.Plant wrapper
US6374540Feb 15, 2000Apr 23, 2002Southpac Trust International, Inc.Plant cover/wrap system
US6449900Jul 20, 2001Sep 17, 2002Southpac Trust International, Inc.Plant wrapper
US6640492Sep 9, 2002Nov 4, 2003Southpac Trust International, Inc.Flower pot wrapper
US6823625Aug 13, 2003Nov 30, 2004The Family Trust U/T/AFlower pot wrapper
Classifications
U.S. Classification281/34, 229/87.6, D19/26
International ClassificationB42D3/00, B42D3/02
Cooperative ClassificationB42D3/02
European ClassificationB42D3/02