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Publication numberUS1920889 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 1, 1933
Filing dateJul 18, 1929
Priority dateJul 18, 1929
Publication numberUS 1920889 A, US 1920889A, US-A-1920889, US1920889 A, US1920889A
InventorsFred W Pullen
Original AssigneeBissell Carpet Sweeper Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carpet sweeper
US 1920889 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1933- F. w. PULLEN 1,920,889

CARPET SWEEPER Filed July 18. 1929 INVENTOR BY Fr d /4 fa/k/Y A TTORNE Y Patented Aug. 1, 1933 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CARPET SWEEPER Mich.

Application July 18, 1929. Serial No. 379,109

4 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in carpet sweepers. The object of the invention is to provide a carpet sweeper of ordinary construction with effective means for discharging statical electricity developed by the friction of the machine in operation.

Objectspertaining to details will appear from the description to follow. A preferred embodiment of my invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in which:

Fig. 1 is a diagrammatic side elevation view of a carpet sweeper embodying the features of my invention, the handle being shown in broken section.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged detail elevation view of the handle.

Fig. 3 is a detail cross sectional view through the handle above the socket, on a line corresponding to line 33 of Figs. 1 and 2.

I show my invention in connection with an ordinary Bissell carpet sweeper which is here shown conventionally. The parts will be identifled by their numerals of reference which are the same in all the views.

The carpet sweeper body comprises the case 1, the floor wheels 2, the brush 3 with the usual construction of spring means 4. 5 is the handle bail. 6 is the handle socket and 7 is the handle which is made of wood with a light coating of shellac or varnish.

I provide on the side of the handle a heavy graphite pencil mark 8 which extends from the socket 6 substantially to the top of the handle, connecting to the metal screw-threaded ferrule 71 which is adapted to the socket 6. The line is applied to the wood before the shellac or varnish is applied.

Statical electricity under certain atmospheric conditions develops to such' an extent in the operation of a carpet sweeper over a carpet that it causes lint or any light fuzzy material to adhere to the carpet sweeper body, often to the extent of very materially interfering with the operation of the carpet sweeper. It is often a mystery to the user because on picking up the carpet sweeper to examine it, the electricity is discharged and there is nothing in evidence anywhere to show what was causing the trouble.

By providing a heavy graphite mark along the woodhandle the electricity, as fast as it is developed from the friction, is discharged through the handle and hands and body of the user to the floor or dissipated to the atmosphere. Of course, if there is not an actual discharge to the floor, the distribution of the static electricity over the larger surface of the person of the user decreases its action to such an extent that the sweeper can be operated without material hindrance. However, under such circumstances the entire charge of statical electricity is usually discharged as fast as it forms.

This invention is, of course, of no avail or advantage where metallic handles are made use of. But such metallic handles are expensive and unless made of light tubes of very high grade metal, they are unduly heavy and do not serve the purpose of a carpet sweeper as well as an ordinary light wood handle. Electric suction sweepers are usually provided with meta1 handles. Where wood handles are used statical electricity develops and should be discharged.

This invention is available on wood handles or fiber handles which are non-conductors of electricity on all kinds of sweepers, hand or electric.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and/desire to secure by Letters Patent, is:

1. The combination of a carpet sweeper. a wood handle therefor with a metallic bail connected to the carpet sweeper, and a graphite line along the said handle from top to bottom adapted in use to connect the metallic parts with the hand of the user.

2. The combination of a carpet sweeper, a wood handle therefor with a metallic bail connected to the carpet sweeper, a graphite line along the said handle from top to bottom adapted in use to connect the metallic parts with the hand of the user, and a coat of varnish embracing said line.

3. A carpet sweeper with a wood handle in a metal socket having a graphite surface connection from the top end of the handle to the socket.

4. A carpet sweeper with a wood handle in a metal socket having a graphite surface connec tion from the top end of the handle to the socket, the said graphite surface connection being coated with varnish.

FRED W. PUILEN.

Referenced by
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US4481556 *Apr 4, 1980Nov 6, 1984Joseph J. BerkeComputer terminal support and hand rest
US4482063 *Dec 18, 1981Nov 13, 1984Joseph J. BerkeComputer terminal support and hand rest
US4482064 *Dec 18, 1981Nov 13, 1984Joseph J. BerkeComputer terminal support and hand rest
US4697300 *Oct 8, 1986Oct 6, 1987Warlop Stephen MAntistatic vacuum cleaner and method
US4715085 *Dec 19, 1986Dec 29, 1987Whirlpool CorporationVacuum cleaner and method of dissipating electrostatic charge
US4715086 *Dec 19, 1986Dec 29, 1987Whirlpool CorporationVacuum cleaner and method of dissipating electrostatic charge through corona discharge
US4754364 *Jul 17, 1987Jun 28, 1988Steelcase Inc.Static dissipative chair
US4913390 *Sep 21, 1988Apr 3, 1990Berke Joseph JPortable adjustable computer keyboard support and hand rest
US6017006 *Jan 12, 1992Jan 25, 2000Alimed, Inc.Keyboard wrist rest
US6357767 *Oct 10, 2000Mar 19, 2002Unarco Industries, Inc.Static-dissipative member for wheeled conveyance
US6503026Sep 12, 1997Jan 7, 2003Redi-Therm Insulation, Inc.Static free method for blowing loose fill insulation
US6552891 *Aug 23, 2000Apr 22, 2003Andreas Stilhl Ag & Co.Portable handheld work apparatus
US20110203076 *Aug 21, 2008Aug 25, 2011Horst SonnendorferHandle for a transport cart
USRE33556 *Oct 2, 1989Mar 19, 1991 Computer terminal support and hand rest
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/41.1, 15/48, 15/143.1, 180/19.1, 361/220, 15/410, 174/46, 361/212
International ClassificationA47L11/00, A47L11/33
Cooperative ClassificationA47L11/4075, A47L11/33
European ClassificationA47L11/40L, A47L11/33