Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1920943 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 1, 1933
Filing dateNov 8, 1930
Priority dateNov 8, 1930
Publication numberUS 1920943 A, US 1920943A, US-A-1920943, US1920943 A, US1920943A
InventorsThompson William L
Original AssigneeReal Silk Hosiery Mills Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Self-supporting hosiery
US 1920943 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1, 1933- w. 1.. THOMPSON 1,920,943

SELF SUPPORTING. HOSI-ERY Filed NOV. 8, 1930 gwwntoz Patented Aug. 1, 1933 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

Application November 8, 1930. serial No; 494,401

Claims.

This invention relatesto hosiery and has particular reference to anarticle of such character which will be easily retained in proper-position on the leg of the wearer without requiring the use of separate supporting, devices such as gar- I It has heretofore been the general practice to employ ga'rtersor similar articles for retaining hosiery in place on the leg "or the -wearer.' Aside from the annoyance of having to connect such devices'with the'hosiery, they have the disad-' vantage of making holes, stretching the stocking welt, and binding the leg in such manner as to interfere with the'proper circulation of the blood.

I am aware that various exoedients havehitherto been resorted to in order to combine supporting means with hosiery with the Viewv of overcoming the various disadvantages such as above enumerated of separate supporting means, but

for the, most part such structures have been unsatisfactory and ine'fficienn More particu-l larly, such devices have been generally so constructed as to produce a strain on the welt of the stocking whch ,eventuates in an undesirable welt and in some cases cause tearing;

, It is the broad purpose'of this invention'to proon the leg, and this only in such portions as will not interfere withthe circulation of the blood or in other'ways prove detrimental to health.

Briefly stated, my invention contemplates the association with a stocking of an elastic band serving as the tension means to retain the stocking in position on the'leg, whic h extends only a 40 portion of the way around the circumference thereof andpositioned so as to be most comfortable to the wearer, and an adjustable inelastic strap or similar device extending the'remainder of the way around the circumference, adapted to prevent strain on or stretching of the stocking fabric by the elastic band, and serving further to cause the elastic tensioning means to'operate efficiently whatever the circumference of' the leg upon which the'stocking'is to be supported. I

5 have found it convenient to incorporate the elastic band in a knit-in double welt at the top of the stocking, such knit-in welt having'the advantage of'being as elastic as other portionsof the stocking and hence permitting the elastic band to operate efficiently. In order that the welt.

stretching tendi'ngbto permanently unshape the.

a of the stocking top. Preferably, the elastic portensioning device may operate with'a minimum of pressure, I.further propose to regulate the length of. the stocking leg, preferably in-accordance with the foot size, so that the top 'or welt will extend above the largest portion of the calf of the wearer. I

In order that the tensioning means which serves to support thestocking may be most efficiently associated therewith, I prefer to provide a double turned-overwelt, the edge of'which is knit-in integrally with the top of a stocking. Such a constructionhas the advantage of enabling the top orwelt to be made to conform to the actual shape of the calf and insures a greater degree'of comfort than is obtained byasewed More. particularly, by reason of the fact that theknit-in weltwill readily stretchas the other portion of the stocking leg, the tensioning means will operate more efficiently and willreadilystretch or contractwithout causing a tensioning or bunching of the welt. ,Also, the knitin welt has the advantage of longer Wear than the sewed welt which after frequent Washing is likely topull out and thus allow the tensioning means .to become exposed or pulled out of the stocking. p

The tensioning means adapted to hold the stocking in position. is preferably incorporated in the welt and comprises a rubber elastic of a type such as will not lose its elastic qualities by reason of contact with water during washing of the stocking. For most efficient results, theelastic is ,tionvshould extend around the front edge of the stocking for, say, substantially one-half of the circumference soas to exert pressure only on the bony front part of the leg. Such an arrangement results in the obvious advantage of enabling the stocking to besupported in place without danger of the rubber elastic drawing the flesh and further prevents pressure .on the soft rear part of the leg which might interfere with the cir-'- culation of the blood. Only the ends of the elas- 110,.

- vided whereby the proper tensioning of the elastic tensioning means are anchored, as by stitching, so that the main portion thereof may expand and contract freely in the welt without causing bunching or undue stretching thereof.

To insure proper adjustment of the tensioning means in conformity withthe circumference of any size leg, and for the further purpose of preventing any strain upon the fabric in the welt, I provide an adjustable inelastic strap or the like, the ends of which are connected to the welt at or near points where the elastic band terminates, such strap being intended to extend around thatportion of the circumference of the stocking top lying opposite to the tensioning means. As just stated, such strap acts as a reinforcement for the welt of the stocking so as to prevent any strain on the same which might otherwise result due to the utilization of the elastic aroundthe other portion of the circumference. By making such means adjustable a convenient expedient is proticfor any size leg may be provided so that the v stocking may be held in pressure. Such strap may place without. undue also be arranged as to be separable at at least one point with a view of I allowingthe stocking to be readily put on or removedfrom the leg.

To further insure the proper support of the {stocking with the minimum of pressure against part of the calf the'leg, it is desirable that the leg of the stockin'g be sufficiently long to extend above the largest so that the supporting means above described will be positioned to effectively operate against the smaller part of the leg above the enlarged portion of thecalf with the obvious result that but little tensioningwill be required to keep the stocking from slipping down. I have found that the length of the stocking leg may be conveniently determined in accordance with the foot size. Thus, the larger the foot size the longer the stocking leg.

A practical embodiment of my invention embodying the above-described features is represented in the accompanying drawing forming a part of this specification, It will be understood that the proportions and positions of the various means combining to constitute the present invenl tion may be altered at will without departing from the spirit and scope thereof.

Fig.1 shows stockings embodying my supporting feature in position on the legs of a human;

Fig. 2 is a perspective view partly in section of the top of a stocking with the supporting means constituting this invention applied thereto;

Fig; 3 is a view in vertical section of the welt of a stocking showing how the tensioning means is incorporated therein.

Referringnow to the drawing, the reference numeral loindicates generally the leg of a stocking having a turned-over welt 11, the edge of which is knit-in to-the body of the stocking along the line 12 as indicated in Figures 2 and 3. Incorporated in the welt so as to be freely movable with respectthereto is an elastic band 13, serving as a tensioning means to firmly hold the top of the stocking against the leg of the wearer and l prevent the same from slipping downwardly. As

shown in Figure-2, the elastic band 13 extends only a portion of the way aroundthe circumference of the welt, the ends of the band being anchored to the welt respectively as by stitching at points 14 and 15. Preferably; the elastic should extend only around the bony'front portion of the leg and terminate short of the fleshy rear portion. It will be understood, however, that the elastic may be otherwise positioned in the welt, and extend around as much of the circumference of the leg as may be desired.

An inelastic tape or strap, preferably comprising separable members 16 and 17, extends around that portion of the circumference of the welt not occupied by the elastic band, the outer ends of the same being anchored to the welt, preferably at or near points 14 and 15 where the ends of the elastic terminate. For convenience and to prevent irritation of the leg such strap may be positioned on the outside of the welt. With such an arrangement, it will-be seen that the tape will reinforce the welt of the stocking so as to prevent stretching. thereof due to tensioning of the elastic band. To enable the proper tensioning of the elastic suitable for the particular circumference of the leg of the wearer whereby the stocking may be held in position without undue pressure, an adjustable member 18 adapted to slide on one member of the tape reinforcing means is provided, said member 18 being further provided with a pin adapted to engage a clasp 19 associated with the other portion of the tape. The length of the tape may thus be conveniently adjusted by moving the member 18 on the tape to effect the proper tensioning in the elastic band, and the clasp elements may be readily disengaged to allow the stocking tobe pulled on or off. I

As shown in Figure 1, the leg 10 of the stocking islonger than isthe usual practice, the length being such as to bring the'supporting means above or opposite to the smaller part of the leg above the largest portion of the calf. With such an arrangement very little tensioning in the elastic band is required to prevent the stocking from sliding downwardly.

While I have here described and illustrated the application of my supporting means in connection with mens socks, it will be understood that it may be. equally well applied to childrens stockings and socks and womens hosiery with the same advantages. It is true, of 'course, that the length of mens, women's and childrens hosiery varies so that the tops of the same will occupy a different position relative to the leg. My supporting means willoperate efficiently in various positions relative to the stocking and leg of the wearer, and for this reason it is not entirely necessary thatit be positioned in a welt at the top, it being understood that the basic features of my supporting means comprise a tensioning band extending for a portion of the stocking circumference. and an adjustable inelastic band extending around the remainder of the circumference.

What I claim is:

g 1. In combination with a stocking leg, a circumferentially-extending supporting means, entirely encircling the same, said means being elastic for only a portion of its length and secured to the stocking fabric at the ends of such portions so that the band will effect a tension over a restricted part of .the circumference of the stocking leg.

, 2. In combination with a stocking leg, an independently formed circumferentially-extending supporting means entirelyencircling the same, said supporting means including an elastic band extending only part way around the stocking and secured to other portions of the supporting means and to the stocking at its ends, so that the band will effect a tension over arestricted part of the circumference of the stocking leg.

3.,In combinationwith a stocking leg, independently formed supporting means completely encircling the same and comprising an elastic tensioning band extending around a portion of the circumference of the leg of the stocking and anchored at its ends thereto, and an inelastic reinforcing band connecting with the elastic band and extending around the remainder of the circumference, said inelastic band being of such length as to prevent strain on the stocking fabric due to tension exerted by the elastic band.

4. In combination with a stocking leg, an elastic tensioning band extending around a portion of the circumference of the leg of the stocking and anchored at its ends thereto, and an inelastic band having its ends secured to the leg at the points of termination of the elastic band extending around the remainder of the circumference and being of a length such as to prevent strain on the stocking fabric due to tension exerted by the elastic band, and means for'adjusting the tension exerted by the elastic band.

5. A stocking having a double welt, an elastic tensioning band Within said welt and extending for a portion of the circumference of the welt, and an inelastic band anchored at its ends to the ends of the elastic band extending around the remainder of the circumference of the welt and secured to the welt so as to prevent stretch of the portion of the welt for which it extends by the elastic band, the elastic band being so positioned and of such length as to operate against the front bony part of a human leg and the inelastic band being adapted to bear against the rear fleshy portion of the same.

6. In combination with a stocking leg, a circumferentially-extending supporting means entirely encircling the same, said means being elastic for only a portion of its length and secured to the stocking fabric at the ends of such portion so that the band will effect a tension over a restricted part of the circumference of the stocking leg, and means for adjusting the tension exerted by the elastic portion of the band.

7. In combination with a stocking leg, a circumferentially-extending supporting band encircling the same elastic for only a portion of its length and secured to the stocking fabric at the ends of the portion so that the band will effect a tension over a restricted part of the circumference of the stocking leg, and adjusting means positioned away from the elastic portion to adjust the tension exerted by the elastic portion.

8. In combination with a stocking leg, a circumferentially-extending supporting means entirely encircling the same, said supporting means including an elastic band extending onlypart way around the stocking and secured to other portions of the supporting means and to the stocking at its ends, so that the band will effect a tension over a restricted part of the circumference of the stocking leg, and means for adjusting the tension exerted by the elastic portion of the band.

9. A stocking having a top, an .elasticband portion of greater resiliency than the stocking fabric extending around the top for a part of its circumferential extent, and an inelastic band portion forming a continuation of the elastic band portion and providing therewith a continuous band extending around the full circumference of the top, said inelastic band portion having connection with both the stocking top andthe elastic band portion.

10. A stocking having a top and supporting means for the stocking in the form of a band extending around the full circumference of the top, said band being connected to the top and including an inelastic portion and an elastic portion of greater resiliency than the stocking fabric, the elastic and inelastic band portions being interconnected and each extending for a substantial part of the full circumference of the top.

11. A stocking having a top, an elastic band of greater resiliency than the stocking fabric extending part way around the top, and an inelastic band extending around the remaining part of the top connected to the top and to the ends of the elastic band.

12. A stocking having a leg portion terminating in a top and of such length that the top will extend above the large calf portion of the human leg and supporting means for the stocking in the form of a band extending circumferentially around the top above the calf,'said band including an inelastic portion extending for a substantial distance around the circumference and secured to the top so as to prevent stretch in the portion of the top fabric which it overlies, said band also including an elastic portion of greater resiliency than the stocking fabric, connecting with the inelastic portion as a continuation thereof and extending for the remaining distance around the top.

WILLIAM L. THOMPSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2638602 *Aug 5, 1950May 19, 1953Barnett BinkowitzSupport structure for stockings
US2805424 *Nov 8, 1956Sep 10, 1957Shamrock Knitting Mills IncNovelty hosiery
US3787892 *Mar 13, 1972Jan 29, 1974P QuinnIce hockey garment
US5283910 *Jul 6, 1992Feb 8, 1994Cynthia FlintExpandable and retractable garment
US7552483 *Mar 15, 2005Jun 30, 2009Gear Up Sports Worldwide Ltd.Athletic sock
US7716755 *Jan 29, 2007May 18, 2010Wiens Joel JAthletic garment
US8745895 *Jun 7, 2012Jun 10, 2014Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a flat knit upper construction or other upper construction
US20120240429 *Jun 7, 2012Sep 27, 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a flat knit upper construction or other upper construction
EP2127546A1 *May 5, 2009Dec 2, 2009Isabella SilberbergerBaby socks
WO2006101826A2 *Mar 14, 2006Sep 28, 2006Gear Up Sports Worldwide LtdAthletic sock
WO2012006654A1 *Dec 8, 2010Jan 19, 2012Owen Frederick John CraigieSock suspension system
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/240
International ClassificationA41B11/00, A41B11/12
Cooperative ClassificationA41B11/12
European ClassificationA41B11/12