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Publication numberUS1921963 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 8, 1933
Filing dateMar 30, 1929
Priority dateMar 30, 1929
Publication numberUS 1921963 A, US 1921963A, US-A-1921963, US1921963 A, US1921963A
InventorsJohn I Crabtree
Original AssigneeEastman Kodak Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fade-in and fade-out for motion picture film sound record
US 1921963 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 8, 19.33. J. CRABTREE 1,921,963

FADE-IN AND FADE-OUT FOR MOTION PICTURE FILM SOUND RECORD,

Filed March 30, 1929 BD DUDIIIIIDUEIIJU ll III ,Io

l I IIII IIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIII Ill] u u UDIJUIII lNvENoR W/IBTEEE ATTORNEYS.

Patented Aug. 8, 1933 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, N. Y., a Corporation of New York Application March 3o, 1929. serial No. 351,251

10 Claims.

This invention relates to sound photography and more particularly to an article and a method useful in preventing objectionable sound effects Vat the change-over from one sound record to another.

In the production of motion picture film bearing a related sound accompaniment inthe form of a sound record having variations in density and variations in Width, it' is customary to block out or obscure the sound record at the point where two different sound records are spliced together by applying opaque lacquer to an area in the form o1' a triangle overlapping the sound record on the support side of the film. This lacquer must be carefully applied so that it will not obscure any portion of the picture area and since existing lacquers and varnishes dry relatively slowly, the former method has 'been particularly objectionable.

In accordance with one feature of the present invention a novel method has been devised forl accomplishing the above result without the attendant disadvantages, which consists in applying a piece of opaque material of appropriate shape to the junction of two sound records.

VA further'feature of the invention includes a novel article of manufacture which facilitates putting into eect the method just referred to.

These novel features together with others will appear from the detailed description and claimsv when taken with the drawing in which Fig. l represents a strip comprising two sections of film, each bearing a different series of pictures with suitable sound record accompaniment for each series; Fig. 2 represents a similar portion of a motion picture record showing the novel means for eliminating the undesirable sound eiiects normal-1 ly encountered in passing from one sound record to another; Fig. 3 is an enlarged view of the volume controlling material shown in connection with the .film of Fig. 2; Fig. 4 is a modif-led form of the sound controlling piece; while Fig. 5 shows the pieces of Fig. 3 mounted on a strip Wound into a roll.

Referring to Fig. 1 there are represented two sections of nlm 10 and `11 spliced together at point l2. The section 10 includes a series of pictures 13, 13 and their related sound record 111 bearing an appropriate sound 'accompaniment While the section 11 includes a series of pictures 15, 15 and .a related sound record 16 bearing aV sound accompaniment appropriate thereto. In the absence of the present invention, in passing from the sound record 14 to the sound record 16 atqthe point 12, an objectionable sound effect is produced. In order to overcome this effect lit has picture area which would result in a noticeable been the practice in the past to cover a triangular area over the junction point 12 with an opaque paint or lacquer. This has required much care to prevent the lacquer from being extended into the irregularity on the margin of the projected picture. Lacquers or paints used for this purpose are slow drying and are generally undesirable in accomplishing the desired result.v It is therefore proposed to obviate the disadvantages of the former method by applying at the junction of the spliced ends of the sound records a piece of opaque material 17 which may be formed of any flexible materiabsuch as a lcellulosic strip treated in a manner to render it substantially opaque. While this piece of material has been shown in triangular form in Figs. 2 and v3 it may be of trapezoidal or other suitable shape as shown in Fig. 4.

In order to facilitate the exact positioning of the pieces of material 17, a series of these pieces in strip form is attached to a piece of porous, .transparent paper 18 by means of mucilage. In applying the piece 17 to the junction of two -pieces of sound record, a trace of nlm cement is applied to this piece while it is attached to 'so the piece of paper 18. The margin 19 of the piece of paper is placed in. registry with the lower margin of the film Where the cement holds the piece 17 in place. After the cement has dried, the piece of paper 18 is moistened and then stripped away from the piece of opaque material. While the pieces 1'? may lie/applied by hand according to the above procedure, they may be applied by means of an automatic machine such as is now used in applying postage stamps to envelopes.

I consideras important the positioning of the applied piece by means of the edge of its carrier strip. Of course other forms of pieces varying longitudinally inthe total light transmitted can be used, the design here shown being illustrative.

It is understood that other embodiments of my invention are possible and that I contemplate all such equivalents and modifications as `fall within the scope of the appended claims.

What I claim is:

l.. In the art of sound photography, the method of reducing the objectionable sound effect at l the change-over from one piece of sound record to another-which comprises obscurng part of 105 the sound record at the change-over point by applying a piece of opaque, flexible material.

2. A motion picture film having thereon two consecutive areas containing photographic sound records joined together, and apiece of opaque 11D material applied to the sound record for obscuring a portion' oi each record at the `,iunctio pointl 3. A motion picture film having thereon two consecutive areas containing photographic sound records joined together at their ends, and a piece of opaque? exible material having tapering ends applied tothe sound record and serving to obscure a portion of each of said sound records at the junction point.

a. As an article of manufacture, a strip of material comprising a support, and a removable. opaque piece carried bysaid support, said opaque piece being vof a size v. suicient to obscure a sub:- stantial portion of a section of photographic sound record when applied thereto.-

5. As an article of manufacture, a strip ofA material for use in applying an opaque piece to the sound record portion of a motion picture band, said strip comprising a supportand opaque stripping piecesremovably attached thereto, said opaque pieces being adapted for application to the motion picture band and to be readily stripped from the support, each piece being of a suilcint size to obscure a substantial portion of a section of said sound record `when applied thereto.

6.As Yan article of manufacturaa 'strip of material for use in applying an opaque piece to the sound record portion of a motion picture band, said strip comprising a support and' opaque stripping pieces removably attached thereto and being of a type adapted for application to the lmotion picture band to be readily stripped from the support, each piece having tapered ends and being of a size to obscure a substantial portion of a section of sound record when applied thereto.

'7. As an articleof' manufacture, a strip of material for use in applying an opaque piece to the sound record portion of a motion picture band. said strip comprising a temporary support and being of a size to obscure a substantial portion of a section of sound record when applied thereto.

a. As an article of manufacture, a strip of mater-iai carrying a series of light obscuring 'sections adapted to vary the light transmitting properties of a sound track nlm and which vary in width longitudinally and which are adapted and intended for application to a perforated film strip carrying a longitudinal sound track, the rst named strip having locating means wheref by it may be correctly positioned on the film overlying the sound track.

9. As an article of manufacture, a strip of material carrying a series of opaque sections. each tapering longitudinally and adapted and intended for application to a perforated film strip, carrying a. longitudinal sound record, the edge of the iirst named as a strip constituting a registering means for the correct positioning of the opaque sections on the sound record.

10. A motion picture film having thereon two consecutive areas containing photographic sound records joined together and a piece of material applied to and obscurlng a portion of each record at Aand adjacent the junctio the total light transmitted by the sound record and the applied piece varying gradually longitudinally of the record.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2506933 *Apr 27, 1945May 9, 1950Mercer Raymond CMeans for patching motion-picture film
US4717343 *Jun 30, 1986Jan 5, 1988Densky Alan BMethod of changing a person's behavior
Classifications
U.S. Classification369/285, 352/91.00R
International ClassificationG11B27/06
Cooperative ClassificationG11B27/06
European ClassificationG11B27/06