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Publication numberUS1922696 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 15, 1933
Filing dateFeb 18, 1931
Priority dateFeb 18, 1931
Publication numberUS 1922696 A, US 1922696A, US-A-1922696, US1922696 A, US1922696A
InventorsHardage Clarence A
Original AssigneeCrouse Hinds Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Single pole double throw quick make and break switch
US 1922696 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' Aug. 15, 1933. c. A. HARDAGE SINGLE POLE DOUBLE THROW QUICK MAKE AND BREAK SWITCH Filed Feb. 18, 1931 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 CHARGE LINE- BRT'TERY CLOSED INVENTOR.

ATTORNEYS Aug. 15, 1933. HARDAGE 1,922,696

SINGLE POLE DOUBLE THROW QUICK MAKE AND BREAK SWITCH Filed Feb. 18, 1951 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 I NVEN TOR.

A TTORNEYS Aug. 15, 1933. c HARDAGE 1,922,696

SINGLE POLE DOUBLE THROW QUICK MAKE AND BREAK SWITCH Filed Feb 18, 1931 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 j mafz w ATTORNEYS.

Aug. 15, 1933. c HARDAGE 1,922,696

SINGLE POLE DOUBLE THROW QUICK MAKE] AND BREAK SWITCH 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Feb. 18, 1931 ATTORNEYS.

Aug. 15, c H R G SINGLE POLE DOUBLE THROW QUICK MAKE AND BREAK SWITCH Filed Feb. 18, 1951 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 VEN TOR A TTORNEYS Patented Aug. 15, 1933 r SINGLE POLE DOUBLE rnnow QUICK MAKE AND BREAK swrrcn Clarence A. Hardage, Syracuse, N. Y., assignor' to Grouse-Hinds Company,

Syracuse, N. Y., a

Corporation of New York Application February 18, 1931. Serial No. 516,594 g 4 Claims.

This invention has for its object, a particularly simple and eiiicient switch construction, and more particularly what might be called a single pole, double throw quick make and break, non-inching or snap switch, and a service system in which these switches are usable to great advantage.

' The invention consists in the novel features and in the combinations and constructions hereinafter set forth and claimed.

In describing this invention, reference is had to the accompanying drawings; in which like characters designate corresponding parts in all the views. l V

Figure 1 is a front elevation of this switch.

Figure 2 is a plan view, the cover and are guiding plate being removed.

Figure 3 is an enlarged sectional View on line 3-3, Figure 2.

Figure 4 is an enlarged, sectional view on line 44, Figure 2.

Figure 5 is a sectional View on ure 4. .3

Figure 6 is a diagrammatic view illustrating one particular use of this switch in a system for charging storage batteries of railway cars.

The switch comprises generally, a a suitable frame or casing, a switch member and operating means therefor mounted in the casing, the latter having a handle located outside the casing, and connections between the operating means and the switch member to impart to it a snap or non-inching action.

i 1 designates the casing, which may be of any suitable form, size and construction, it being here shown as a box open at its top and bottom.

2 is the switch member, it being mounted to move about an axis between the contacts 3, 4. The axis is, for convenience, considered as horizontal.

This switch member is mounted at one end upon a rocking support 5 mounted in suitable bearings in the housing, the support extending at a right angle to the plane'of movement of the switch member, and located in the lower part. of the housing. i

The switch member is provided with sets of laminated contacts 6, '7, and with auxiliary contacts 8, 9, arranged to engage the contacts 3, 4, 50 respectively, in advance of the engaging of the contacts 6, '7, 'with the contacts 3, 4, and to separate after the breaking of the contacts 6, 7, from the contacts 3, 4, in' order to prevent arcing between the laminated contacts and the contacts 3, 4; There are preferably, a plurality of spring pressed. contacts for each laminated contact,there line 55, Figthat the contacts 8, 9, still remain in contact with means between the operating member and the being here shown one auxiliary contact 8 or 9 for each laminated contact 6 or 7. The contacts 8 or 9 are yieldable independently of each other, and are provided with arcing contacting heads 10,

11 respectively. The laminated terminals 6, 7 are beveled at their ends in order to engage correspondingly inclined, or angular surfaces 12 of the contacts 3, 4. The contacting heads 10, 11 also coact with inclined surfaces 13 of the contacts 3, 4. The surfaces 12, 13 of each contact 3, 4, are arranged at an inclined convex or exterior 1 angle.

A block or strip 15 of suitable insulation is embedded on each face 13 to separate the face 13 from the face 12. In practice, the contacts 6, 7 7- carry the usual current for which the switch is designed. The strips 15 of insulation are pri-' marily to prevent the arc that'may be formed by the breaking of the contact heads l0, l1; 3, 4, from following on the faces 12. The laminated terminals 6, 7 are flexed or tensioned when engaged with the contacts 3, 4. The contacts 9, 10 are also of resilient construction, but more flexible than the contacts 6, 7. When the switch member 2 is shifted, greater 30 tension is momentarily placed upon the contacts 6, 7, as will be hereinafter explained, and when leaving the contacts 3,4, this tension aidsin quickly breaking the contact. It is to be noted the contacting sur aces 13 after the contacts 6, 7 have separated from the surfaces 12.

It is now apparent that arcing between the contacts 6, '7; 3, 4, is reduced to a minimum, because the entire circuit is not broken by the separation of these contacts, but momentarily the circuit is thrown onto the contacts 8, 9. This sequence of operation is reversed when the contacts of the switch member 2 are engaging the r contacts 3, 4. That is, the contacting heads l0, 11 first engage the surfaces13 completing the circuit and instantly thereafter, the heavy 1aminated contacts 6,-7, engage the surfaces 12. This construction together with the insulating strip between the surfaces 12, 13 prevent any appreciable amount of arcing between the heavy contacts and thus greatly prolong the life of the switch Without periodic repairs. The support 5 is mounted in suitable cone or pivot bearings-l6 provided in the bracket or support for the operating mechanism.

The operating mechanism comprises a rocking member 20 having a shaft or axle21 mounted in a support or bracket 22, and motion transmitting secured to the bracket 22 angle.

the cam 26 to throw 2 support 5 of the switch member 2. The bracket 22 is here shown as detachably mounted on a wall 23 of the casing l and secured thereto in any suitable manner, as by screws 2a. A handle or crank 25 is provided on the shaft 21 on the outside of the case or wall 23thereof. The handle 25 is removable to prevent unauthorized operation of the switch. The connections between the operating member 29 and the switch support 5 are shown as coacting V shape wedge members 26 and 27 provided respec "vely on the member 20 and the support 5, one of these wedge members being shiftablc axially against the action of a spring, and one of them being of a less angle than the other.

In the illustrated embodiment of my invention, the wedge member 26 carried by the operating member 20 is shiftable axially and is provided at the end of a plunger slidable in a bore 29 in the operating member 29, and is spring pressed byv a spring interposed between a detachable plug 31 at the outer end of the operating member and the head of the plunger 28. The wedge member or cam 27 is shown as of a less angle than the wedge member or cam 26, the cam 26 being substantially a right angle, and the cam 27 an acute The interior of the member 20 forms a lubricant receiving chamber which has a duct 32 opening through the apex or wedge or cam 26. A suitable wick is provided with the chamber 29 and extending out through the duct 32 so as to conduct the 'oil or lubricant to the apex of the cam 26 and lubricate the surfaces of both cams 26, 27. The general operation of these cams or wedges is substantially like that shown in my pending application, Sr. No. 507,892 filed January 10, 1931.

Referring to Figure 5, movement of the upper end of the operating member 20 over to the right, would cause one cam face of the cam 26 to presson the apex of the cam 2'7, and the cam 26 to be forced inwardly against the action of the spring 30 until the apex of the cam 26 passes over the apex 'of the cam 27, whereupon the spring30 reacts and pushes the plunger 28, and the cam 26 outwardl causing the other face of the cam member 27 over to the right, and thus actuate the switch member 2 with a snap action. The reverse of this operation takes place when the handle and the operating member 20 are thrown in the opposite direction. The movement of the operating member 20 is limited by a shoulder 35 on the rear side thereof, working in a slot 36 in the frame or bracket 22. The casing, or the wall 23,'is provided with an arcuate guide 3'? on its outer side around .the shaft 21 to prevent placing of the operating handle 25 on the shaft, except in the position shown in Figure 1. The bottom of the casing l is open. The casing is mounted'upon a supporting surface with a" gasket 39 of insulating material interposed between the supporting surface and the bottom edge of the casing, and. the casing secured to the supporting surface by any suitable fastening means, as by screws 38.- The top of the box is closed by a detachable cover plate 40. g The contacts 3, 4 and their binding devices 41, 42, are mounted on a panel 43 of insulation at i l, the panelextending between the operating member 20 and the switch member 2 separating one from the other. A perforated plate 45 of insulating material for quenching any are that may occur at the contacts is secured to the upper edge'of the panel 43 and overhangs the contacts 3, 4.

46 and 47 are cables or wires connected respectively to the contacts 3, 4 and having their other ends connected to suitable terminals in the plug socket or receptacle 60. The switch member 2 with its associated contacts 6, 7, 10, 11 is electrically connected to a binding device 50 also mounted on the panel 43 and which in turn has connected to it the cable 51. This cable is connected to one side of the source of supply and has in its circuit a variable resistance R.

Figure 6 presents diagrammatically, one use for which this switch is particularly adapted. Four switches are shown interconnected to a common source of supply. The first switch nearest the source of supply is shown with the movable switch member 2 in engagement with the contact 3. An additional wire or cable 52 is also connected with the contact l and has its other end connected with the movable switch member 2 in the adjoining switch. It will be observed that in the first switch, a plug 62 has been inserted in the receptacle 60 and the battery 61 cut into series with the source of supply, the circuit consisting of the wire 51, switch member 2, contact 5, wire 46, through the plug receptacle, plug load circuit carried thereby, such as a storage battery in a vehicle as a railway car, through the other side of the plug, plug receptacle, wire 47, thence through the wire 52 to the movable switch mem er in the adjacent switch. As there is no load being taken from this second switch, or in other words, as this second switch has its movab e switch member in engagement with the contact 4, the current passes through the switch, through the connecting cable 52 to the movable switch member of the next switch and so on through the series of the switches, and back through the return wire In this particular circuit, a load may be plugged in on any of the plug sockets or receptacles 60. As each additional load is plugged in,'the variable resistance is adjusted for the load and the switchmernber 2 moved out of engagement with the contact 4 and into engagement with the contact 3. This operation cuts the plug and its associated load in series with the circuit. In the circuit above referred to, the practice heretofore consisted in having the plug receptacles similar to plug receptacles 60 connected in series in a charging circuit. Inserted in these receptacles were short circuited or dummy plugs, which consisted simply of a plug with its terminal short circuited. When it was desired to charge the batteries in the pullman car, the dummy plug was removed from the receptacle and the plug with the cap connected to the batteries in the car was inserted in the receptacle. This procedure necessitated the operator going to the main switch board and breaking the entire circuit; otherwise, if the charging circuit had one or more cars on it, the removal of the dummy plug and the insertion of the line plug would be accompanied by such heavy arcing that injury to the operator would result. With this method, the charging circuits were continuously interrupted for substantial periods of time.

i My switch is particularly advantageous for use in such a circuit or system in that the changeover in connecting a battery line plug in thefcircult is accompanied by only a momentary break in the circuit. It does not require complete opening of the charging icircuit. While it is particularly simple and compact in construction, it does providea solution to a problem such as referred to above, with the unique quick make and break operating mechanism, and the special provision to reduce arcing to a minimum and hence, greatly prolong the life and efficiency of the switch.

What I claim is:

1. A switch comprising a casing, a rock shaft journalled in the casing having one end extending through one side of the casing, a second rock shaft mounted within the casing extending parallel to the first shaft and having secured at one end thereof a movable switch element, motion transmitting connections between said shafts comprising coacting V shaped wedge members connected at their bases respectively to the shafts, one of said wedge members being connected rigidly to one of the shafts, and the other resiliently connected to the other shaft, whereby it has axial movement toward and from the shaft, stationary contacts arranged in the path of the movable switch member, and an operating manual connected to the outer end of the said first rock shaft.

2. A switch comprising a casing, stationary contacts mounted in the casing, and a movable switch member for coacting with the contacts, operating mechanism for shifting the movable switch member from one contact to another including, a'support detachably secured to one side of the casing, switch operating mechanism carried by said support including a rock shaft journalled in said support having one end extending through the side wall of the casing, a

second rock shaft also journalled in said support and extending parallel to the said first rock shaft, the movable switch member secured to one end thereof, motion transmitting connections between the shafts comprising coacting V-shaped Wedge members, and an operating manual secured on the outer end of the said first shaft.

3. A switch comprising a casing, stationary contacts mounted within the casing, and a movable switch member for coacting with the consaid first rock shaft.

tacts, operating mechanism for shifting the movable switch member from one contact to the other including, a support detachably secured to one side of the casing, a rock shaft journalled in said support having one end extending through theside wall of the casing, a second rock shaft also journalled in said support and extending parallel to the said first rock shaft, the movable switch member secured to one end thereof, and .a V shaped wedge member secured near the other end of said shaft with the apex of the V toward the first shaft, the first shaft also having a slidably mounted V shaped wedge member coacting with the wedge member on the second shaft, said wedge members constituting motion transmitting connections between the shafts, and an operating manual secured on the outer end of said first shaft.

4. A switch comprising a casing, stationary contacts mounted within the casing, and a movable switch member for coacting with the contacts respectively, operating mechanism for shifting the movable switch member including a support detachably secured to one side of the casing and having a rock shaft journalled therein with one end extending through the side wall of the casing, a second shaft journalled in said support extending parallel with said first shaft, said movable switch member carried at one end of the second shaft and the opposite end of the shaft being formed with a V shaped wedge member with the apex of the V extending toward the first shaft, the first shaft being formed with a cylinder extending radially from the shaft and having resiliently mounted therewith a plunger, the outer end of the plunger being wedge shaped, and coacting with the wedge shaped member of the second shaft to constitute motion transmitting connections between the shafts, and an operating manual secured to the outer end of the CLARENCE A. HARDAGE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2972663 *Feb 3, 1958Feb 21, 1961Allied Control CoToggle switch
US7264585 *Sep 28, 2001Sep 4, 2007Delisle Clarence AApparatus for treating body ailments
US7963904 *Mar 10, 2005Jun 21, 2011Delisle Clarence AMethod and device for treating body ailments
Classifications
U.S. Classification200/431
International ClassificationH01H21/42, H01H5/00, H01H5/04, H01H21/00
Cooperative ClassificationH01H5/045, H01H21/42
European ClassificationH01H21/42